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Apple executive Phil Schiller quits Twitter after Elon Musk takeover

 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

Apple executive Phil Schiller has deleted his account on Twitter, amid ongoing questions about the future of the platform.

Phil Schiller is one of Apple’s most powerful employees. Having previously being head of Apple’s marketing, he has now taken a position as an “Apple Fellow” that sees him run Apple’s live events as well as the App Store.

Until this weekend, Mr Schiller had an account with more than 200,000 followers, which was originally created in 2008. He was among one of Apple’s most high-profile Twitter users, posting on the account in an informal style that saw him highlight marketing campaigns and engage with users.

But over the weekend his account was deleted. Visitors now only see a message telling them that “this account doesn’t exist”.

The deletion came around the same time that Elon Musk announced he would revoke Donald Trump’s suspension. That was just one of many controversial decisions Mr Musk has made in the weeks he has been running the company, which has also included firing the majority of its staff and sending its verification process into disarray.

Apple has always had an unusual relationship with Twitter. The company’s official account, for instance, has not posted once – despite having almost 9 million followers – apart from hidden promoted posts that do not appear on its timeline.

But chief executive Tim Cook is still on the platform. He has posted since Mr Schiller’s account was deleted, to mark Transgender Day of Remembrance and pay tribute to the victims of the shooting in Colorado.

Earlier this month, Mr Cook discussed his views on Twitter and his hopes that the site would continue to moderate content as it does already. Apple has pointed to moderation problems in banning apps before, as in the case of Parler.

“They say that they’re going to continue to moderate, and so I count on them to do that because I don’t think anybody really wants hate speech on their platform,” Mr Cook said in the interview.