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Aston Martin uncovers its uber-luxe Lagonda SUV concept at Geneva

Jill Petzinger
·Germany Correspondent, Yahoo Finance UK
The new Aston Martin Lagonda SUV Concept at the 89th Geneva International Motor Show, March 5, 2019. Photo: Reuters/Pierre Albo
The new Aston Martin Lagonda SUV Concept at the 89th Geneva International Motor Show, March 5, 2019. Photo: Reuters/Pierre Albo

The subject of Brexit may be hanging around executives at this week’s Geneva Motor Show like a bad smell, but Aston Martin CEO Andy Palmer presented the brand’s stunning new lineup today without once mentioning it – no easy feat for the head of a British company.

Not that Aston isn’t bracing for it: Aston revealed last week that it was setting aside £30m ($39.5m) to buffer it against a Brexit fallout.

Today, however, was all about dazzling hypercars and its new electric Lagonda All Terrain Concept SUV.

Palmer described the massive Lagonda SUV as “like a sculpture on wheels” and akin to being in a private jet. The decision to develop a premium electric SUV, he said, was based on the growth potential of both SUVs and the automotive shift to electrification. The Lagonda SUV will be produced in Aston Martin’s new St Athan plant, Wales, from some time in 2022 onwards.

As well as the Lagonda SUV concept, Aston executives pulled the sheets off its AM-RB 003, the third member of its mid-engined family along with the Valkyrie and Valkyrie AMR Pro. Only 500 of the 003s will be built, and those 500 customers can expect their hypercar after 2021.

The new Aston Martin AM-RB 003. Photo: Reuters/Pierre Albouy
The new Aston Martin AM-RB 003. Photo: Reuters/Pierre Albouy

That wasn’t all. Aston also premiered a new Vanquish Vision Concept, which will be its first series production mid-engine car.

Aston Martin Lagonda shares took a dramatic dive last week after the company reported a £68m loss in the year, despite record sales £1.1bn. Palmer today referred to the company’s record 12 months, and the 26% increase. He said Aston was moving on to the next stage in its “Second Century” strategy, which is growth.