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Coronavirus: Brits could be saving over £1,000 on toll roads while working from home

Abigail Fenton
·Writer
·2-min read
A return toll booth journey costs Brits £4.83. Photo: SOPA Images/SIPA USA/PA Images
A return toll booth journey costs Brits £4.83. Photo: SOPA Images/SIPA USA/PA Images

UK workers could save up to £1,264.15 ($1,634) a year on toll roads by working from home.

Based on eight of the most expensive tolls around the UK, Brits would have to pay about £2.41 to pass through, analysis by Leasing Options found.

When doubled for the return leg, that means that a single journey can cost one driver £4.83 a day.

If a driver has to make this journey every day of the working week, that increases to about £24.13 a week, £106.15 a month, and whopping £1,264.15 a year — 3.5% of the average UK salary.

READ MORE: Coronavirus — Millions of Brits resort to working in cars

This is nearly as much as the average UK household spends on their gas and electricity bills a year, at £1,289, according to energy provider OVO.

For the same price, Brits could also charge an electric vehicle 150 times, and fill their tank with petrol 17 times.

What’s more, some Brits could end up paying considerably more than this, the study found.

The M6 Toll has two payment plazas, GreatWyrley Toll Plaza for northbound and Weeford Toll Plaza for southbound. The cost is £6.70 for a car, which is by far the most expensive toll in the country.

READ MORE: A third of drivers could save on car insurance by installing dash cams

Those who travel through this toll every work day would rack up a bill of £3,510.80 over a year — over twice their annual gas and electricity bill.

In second place is the Dartford Crossing, which consists of the cable-stayed Queen Elizabeth II Bridge and two bored tunnels, and is the only fixed road crossing of the Thames east of Greater London. The crossing is also pretty expensive at £2.50.

Over a year, this is half what the average person spends on food annually — or 34 weeks of food for one person.

Meanwhile, the Mersey Gateway, which bridges Widnes and Runcorn and runs over the Manchester Ship Canal, comes in third. The toll here is £2, which is still quite a large sum that adds up to £1,040 over a year.