UK markets closed
  • FTSE 100

    6,630.52
    -20.36 (-0.31%)
     
  • FTSE 250

    20,961.31
    -334.92 (-1.57%)
     
  • AIM

    1,163.26
    -10.13 (-0.86%)
     
  • GBP/EUR

    1.1617
    +0.0020 (+0.17%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.3828
    -0.0066 (-0.47%)
     
  • BTC-GBP

    34,944.26
    +150.07 (+0.43%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    982.93
    +39.75 (+4.21%)
     
  • S&P 500

    3,841.94
    +73.47 (+1.95%)
     
  • DOW

    31,496.30
    +572.16 (+1.85%)
     
  • CRUDE OIL

    66.28
    +2.45 (+3.84%)
     
  • GOLD FUTURES

    1,698.20
    -2.50 (-0.15%)
     
  • NIKKEI 225

    28,864.32
    -65.78 (-0.23%)
     
  • HANG SENG

    29,098.29
    -138.50 (-0.47%)
     
  • DAX

    13,920.69
    -135.65 (-0.97%)
     
  • CAC 40

    5,782.65
    -48.00 (-0.82%)
     

Covid R Rate: Here’s What It Is Near You

Sara C Nelson
·Senior Editor, HuffPost UK
·2-min read

The reproduction number, or R rate, of coronavirus transmission across the UK is between 0.8 and 1.0 according to the latest government figures – its first fall below 1 since early December.

Last week, it was between 1.2 and 1.3.

The R measures the number of people, on average, that each sick person will infect. If R is greater than 1, the epidemic is generally seen to be growing. If R is less than 1 the epidemic is shrinking.

Here’s what the R is in each region of England

  • East of England 0.6 to 0.9 (last week: 1.0 to 1.3)

  • London 0.7 to 0.9 (0.9 to 1.2)

  • Midlands 0.9 to 1.2 (1.1 to 1.4)

  • North-east and Yorkshire 0.8 to 1.1 (1.1 to 1.3)

  • North-west 0.9 to 1.2 (1.2 to 1.5)

  • South-east 0.7 to 1.0 (1.0 to 1.2)

  • South-west 0.9 to 1.2 (1.2 to 1.5)

The R number, explained

The R number – sometimes referred to as the R0 – is the “basic reproduction number”. It’s used to measure the transmission potential of a disease.

The R value represents the number of people that one infected person will, on average, pass the virus on to. It’s influenced by characteristics of the specific disease (in this case, Covid-19), such as how easily it passes from person to person. Human behaviour – i.e. how closely we follow social distancing measures – will also impact the R number.

When the R number is below 1, this suggests the number of cases is shrinking. Anything above 1 suggests cases and subsequent infections are growing – and is a cause for concern, because cases snowball.

An R rate of 0.8 to 1.0 means every 10 people infected will on average infect eight to 10 others between them.

While it can help indicate if lockdown measures are working, the R number doesn’t offer the full picture; the R value can show if an epidemic is getting bigger or smaller, but not how large it is.

“R should always be considered alongside the number of people currently infected,” the government website explains. “If R equals 1 with 100,000 people currently infected, it is a very different situation to R equals 1 with 1,000 people currently infected.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost UK and has been updated.