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COVID-19 cases and deaths fall further in the UK, vaccinations rise

·1-min read
FILE PHOTO: Patients are greeted by Abbey staff outside a vaccination centre at Westminster Abbey in London

LONDON (Reuters) - A total of 1,770 new cases of COVID-19 were recorded in the United Kingdom on Sunday, with the seven-day total of 14,659 cases down by 4.3% compared with the previous seven days.

The country recorded two new deaths within 28 days of a positive COVID-19 test. The seven-day death toll of 67 was down by 39.1% compared with the previous seven days.

The data showed that 35.37 million people, or 67.2% of the UK adult population, have now received a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Of those, 17.67 million, or 33.5% of adults, have received the recommended two doses.

Since the start of the pandemic, a total of 127,605 people have died in the United Kingdom within 28 days of testing positive for COVID-19.

The country experienced a devastating second wave that peaked in late January, but numbers of new infections, hospitalisations and deaths have plummeted since then.

That has been attributed in part to the impact of the mass vaccination programme, and in part to strict lockdown measures that were in place from January to March and are only gradually being eased.

(Reporting by Estelle Shirbon; Editing by Andrew Heavens)