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Everything you need to know about the Xbox Series X and Series S

Martyn Landi, PA Technology Correspondent
·3-min read

The next generation of Xbox consoles have arrived in the UK in the shape of the Xbox Series X and Series S.

The gaming firm says the £449 Series X is the most powerful console it has ever made, while the smaller Series S is priced at £249 and meant to offer a more accessible route into modern gaming.

Here is a closer look at the two new consoles.

– Xbox Series S

Priced at £249 and measuring in at 6.5cm x 15.1cm x 30cm with a weight of 1.9kg, the Series S is compact in every sense.

It is in fact the smallest Xbox ever, but it packs a punch, with four teraflops of processing power – which is similar to a PlayStation 4 Pro.

In terms of performance, it can run games at 1440p resolution, better known as Quad HD, and at 60 frames per second, but with support for up to 120 fps for even smoother visuals.

Xbox Series S
The Series S is the smallest Xbox ever (Xbox)

Xbox has also confirmed there is support for 4K resolution if developers choose to render games in such high resolution.

Content from platforms such as Netflix, Amazon and Disney can be streamed in 4K Ultra HD.

Elsewhere inside the device there is 512GB of storage, but both the Series S and Series X support storage expansion.

Crucially the Series S is a digital-only console which means there is no disc drive so all content must be downloaded digitally.

But it does share a number of key features with its bigger sibling, including the harnessing of DirectX raytracing technology, which greatly improves how games can render light, making them look more realistic.

It also offers Quick Resume, enabling players to jump between and back into games in seconds, drastically cutting load times.

– Xbox Series X

The new flagship of the Xbox family, the Series X, has been described as the most powerful device the gaming giant has ever made.

Priced at £449, the Series X comes in a surprisingly compact package at 15.1cm x 15.1cm x 30.1cm, although it does weigh 4.4kg.

That is because inside is a range of technology normally found in a high-end gaming PC.

Part of what Xbox calls its Velocity Architecture in both consoles, the Series X houses 12 teraflops of processing power, which is double what can be found in the current generation Xbox One X, a powerhouse in its own right.

Xbox Series X
The Series X has double the processing power of the Xbox One X (Xbox)

With those processing capabilities, the Series X will run games in 4K resolution at 60 fps, with further support for 120 fps too.

But thanks to its high-tech fan and cooling system, which involves the eye-catching black and green vents on the top of the console, the device stays very cool and makes little noise.

It also comes with one terabyte of storage.

Like the Series S, it too uses Quick Resume to rapidly launch games and has a disc drive which supports 4K UHD and Blu-Ray discs.

Both consoles also support Dolby Vision enhanced video technology, as well as Dolby TrueHD with Atmos audio for better all-round sound output.

Owners of either console can also choose to join Xbox Game Pass, where a library of more than 100 games can be streamed instantly.