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FedEx killer able to get guns despite family warning police that he was a danger

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David Millward
·2-min read
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Mourners hold a vigil for the victims of the Indianapolis FedEx shooting - Jon Cherry/Getty
Mourners hold a vigil for the victims of the Indianapolis FedEx shooting - Jon Cherry/Getty

Brandon Scott Hole, who killed eight people at an Indianapolis FedEx facility was able to buy two assault rifles despite his mother warning the police that he posed a threat to himself and others.

Police had already confiscated a shotgun from Scott Hole in March 2020 after his family had contacted the police.

But only four months later he was able to buy an assault rifle in Indianapolis, and then add another to his arsenal only two months after that.

Both transactions were legal, even though the authorities had been warned of his mental instability.

He used the weapons to kill eight people at the facility, where he once worked before being sacked, before turning the gun on himself.

Brandon Scott Hol
Brandon Scott Hol

Four of the victims were members of the local Sikh community. The others were two 19-year-olds, a university graduate and a father. Police have yet to determine a motive for the slaughter.

In an emotional statement, Hole's family apologised for the "pain and hurt" he had caused.

“We are devastated at the loss of life caused as a result of Brandon’s actions; through the love of his family, we tried to get him the help he needed," the statement said.

"Our sincerest and most heartfelt apologies go out to the victims of this senseless tragedy. We are so sorry for the pain and hurt being felt by their families and the entire Indianapolis community."

Under Indiana's "Red Flag" law the courts have the power to seize weapons from people who display warning signs of violence.

However, police have declined to say whether the law was invoked in Hole's case.

US president, Joe Biden, described the mass shooting at Indianapolis - the latest in a series in recent weeks - as a "national embarrassment".

He has said he is willing to use his executive powers to tighten the law, although other changes would need congressional approval, which could prove difficult to secure.

On Tuesday night there were reports that three people have been shot dead in Austin, Texas. According to the police the incident, which took place at an Arboretum, was an "isolated domestic event".