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Former Wirecard boss must testify to parliament in person - court

·1-min read
The headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions is seen in Aschheim
The headquarters of Wirecard AG, an independent provider of outsourcing and white label solutions for electronic payment transactions is seen in Aschheim

BERLIN (Reuters) - The former head of collapsed payments services provider Wirecard <WDIG.DE> must appear in person before a German parliamentary inquiry on Thursday after a court rejected his lawyers' motion for him to be allowed to testify by video link.

The Federal Court of Justice rejected the request from Markus Braun, who has been detained since July pending a trial on charges of fraud and embezzlement, according a letter, seen by Reuters, sent by the court to the parliamentary committee that will hear him.

The ruling means that former Chief Executive Braun, held on suspicion of defrauding investors through false accounting, could be brought to Berlin to appear before the committee in handcuffs.

Braun, and several other accused, deny any wrongdoing.

His laywers had argued that the circumstances of the coronavirus pandemic made it unnecessarily risky for him to testify in person, especially when the necessity of providing prisoner transport was considered.

Munich-based Wirecard collapsed in June after auditors EY refused to sign off on its 2019 accounts because it could not verify 1.9 billion euros (1.70 billion pounds) supposedly held abroad in escrow by third-party partners.

(Reporting by Holger Hansen, writing by Thomas Escritt)