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Frankie Bridge talks negative impact of child stardom as she reflects on S Club Juniors fame

·2-min read
Frankie Bridge reflected on her childhood fame. (Getty Images)

Frankie Bridge reflected on her childhood fame. (Getty Images)

Frankie Bridge has reflected on the impact fame has on child stars as they enter into adulthood in the wake of a new Britney Spears documentary.

The singer was just 12 years old when she joined S Club Juniors, a spin-off group from the original S Club 7, and has been candid about mental health problems she’s experienced as an adult.

The New York Times’ investigation in Framing Britney Spears examines the life of the pop star, who found international fame as a teenager, and the controversial conservatorship that’s impacted her life for 13 years following a public breakdown.

Read more: Frankie Bridge says depression brought her closer to husband Wayne

Reflecting on her own experience on Loose Women on Tuesday as the panel discussed the documentary, Bridge, 32, said she understood why those who find fame young may go on to experience problems in adulthood and questioned whether her own stardom could’ve potentially contributed to her mental health troubles.

"I was 12 when I was in S Club Juniors," Bridge explained. "Our level of success was nothing like Britney so I'm not trying to compare myself to her, but it's really hard to be successful when you're so young and then try and continue that when you're older, I think that's where the problems come from."

The mother-of-two noted she was “lucky” as she had a lot of protection around her at the time, but that not everyone can be so fortunate.

“I was lucky, we were really protected and I had a really good team around me - I still talk to a lot of them now - but I don’t feel like that’s the case for everybody. I didn’t have pushy parents but I still essentially ended up having a mental breakdown when I was 21. Would that have happened if I wasn’t in the public eye? I don’t know.

S Club Juniors backstage at a TV show, London, circa 2002. Left to right (back) Daisy Evans, Jay Asforis, Frankie Sandford, Rochelle Wiseman, Stacey McClean, Calvin Goldspink, (kneeling) Aaron Renfree, Hannah Richings. (Photo by David Tonge/Getty Images)

S Club Juniors backstage at a TV show, London, circa 2002. Left to right (back) Daisy Evans, Jay Asforis, Frankie Sandford, Rochelle Wiseman, Stacey McClean, Calvin Goldspink, (kneeling) Aaron Renfree, Hannah Richings. (Photo by David Tonge/Getty Images)

“I can see why it happens to so many people, why they turn to drug use and things like that because it’s hard to keep that high and that level of success.”

Read more: What is the #FreeBritney movement?

Spears’ father Jamie has been her conservator since 2008 following the public breakdown. However, fans of the star have questioned the terms of the conservatorship and have concerns it is not in her best interests, prompting the #FreeBritney movement.

In November, she lost a legal attempt to remove her father’s control over her estate.

Watch: Former news anchor Matt Lauer criticised for resurfaced Britney Spears interview