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Heart-warming first images of koala joeys born at Edinburgh Zoo released

One of the koala joeys which was born at Edinburgh Zoo last year <i>(Image: RZSS)</i>
One of the koala joeys which was born at Edinburgh Zoo last year (Image: RZSS)

THE first pictures have been released of two koala joeys born at Edinburgh Zoo.

The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) shared the images of the young koalas born at Edinburgh Zoo to mums Kalari and Inala.

Keepers at the wildlife conservation charity said the youngsters are both female and only recently started to emerge from the pouch – where newborn koalas spend their first few months.

Lorna Hughes, animal team leader at RZSS, said: “We are delighted both joeys are doing well and we are beginning to see them more and more. They are the only Queensland koalas in the UK which makes every newborn really special.

“With their species facing many threats in the wild, the two new girls give our charity an incredibly exciting opportunity to engage and inspire even more visitors to help protect, value and love wildlife around the world.”

The National:
The National:
The National:
The National:

The names of the joeys will be chosen by RZSS supporters in the coming weeks.

Kalari mated with male Tanami, who lives separately from the females at Edinburgh Zoo. Inala mated with Dameeli, who now lives in Pairi Daiza in Belgium.

The koala joeys were born on May 20 and July 13 last year.

Newborn koalas are the size of a jellybean and move straight into the mother's pouch where they stay for several months, RZSS said.

After outgrowing the pouch, joeys spend around 12 months on their mother’s back before becoming more independent.