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How to live a long life: Tips and tricks to keep your organs healthy

·3-min read

The desire to live longer has been chronicled in Greek myth as well as modern novels and films. However, advances in technology, medicine, and human health have enabled people to live longer lives. It's not a magical potion but rather an excellent habit that helps you live longer.

A person's lifetime may be impacted to a lesser extent by genetic variables and to a greater extent by the current lifestyle. Those who lived the longest — into their late nineties and beyond – were less prone to develop age-related autoimmune disorders such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes.

A healthy lifestyle may help you age more gracefully and possibly add years to your life. According to studies, there are numerous ways to live longer and better lives while keeping your organs healthy:

Maintain your body's hydration levels

Photo by Daria Shevtsova from Pexels
Photo by Daria Shevtsova from Pexels

Staying hydrated by drinking four to six glasses of water each day is always a good idea because water aids the kidneys in the elimination of waste materials from circulation. Toxins can build up in your body if you become dehydrated, harming your kidneys and liver. While staying hydrated keeps your blood arteries open and allows blood to flow freely, dehydration causes your blood to thicken, making it more difficult for your organs to cleanse themselves.

Consume nutritious foods

Fruits & veggies lead to better memory and healthy heart
Fruits & veggies lead to better memory and healthy heart

Natural sugar sources, such as fresh fruit, are easier for your body to absorb than artificial sugars and they do not overload your organs. It is also essential to consume enough fiber, which is found in fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain products.

Avoiding processed carbohydrates, as per some research, especially refined carbohydrates such as those found in bread, basmati rice, and pasta, as well as in fizzy drinks, bakery goods, and high-fat meals will help keep your body healthy and functioning correctly. Excessive salt consumption can also result in high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart and kidney disease.

Begin engaging in regular physical activity

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels
Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

Physical activity regularly can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, increase muscle strength, improve sleep quality, and help you maintain a healthy weight. You don't need to stick to a strict workout regimen; simply do something that causes your heart rate to rise regularly.

Avoid supplements and over-the-counter medications

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

Over-the-counter medications and supplements should be avoided. Because most drugs are broken down in the liver after being metabolized, taking multiple medications at once or exceeding the recommended dosage can be dangerous. Some vitamin supplements and herbal therapies can be harmful to your kidneys if taken in excess, as they can build up and cause damage, as well as interact negatively with prescription medications. If you are unsure whether a drug is more harmful than beneficial, speak with your doctor.

Stop using tobacco and drinking alcohol

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels
Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

Tobacco use causes artery hardening and, in some cases, kidney hardening, which reduces the amount of blood that can flow to the kidneys and the heart. It may also cause high blood pressure, which increases the risk of heart and kidney problems. Furthermore, limiting alcohol consumption may help to reduce the amount of liver damage.

Keep your blood sugar levels under control

Photo by PhotoMIX Company from Pexels
Photo by PhotoMIX Company from Pexels

High blood sugar levels can lead to heart disease, blood vessel damage, and renal disease to name just a few of the problems. Follow the steps outlined above regularly to monitor and naturally reduce your blood sugar levels.

Opt for a check-up

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels
Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Talk to your doctor about your kidneys if you have a heart condition; if you have renal disease, talk to your doctor about your heart, especially if you have diabetes or high blood pressure. An imbalance in one organ can always affect another so it is better to regularly get yourself tested.

Organs are precious; protect yours!

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