UK markets closed
  • NIKKEI 225

    27,935.62
    +113.86 (+0.41%)
     
  • HANG SENG

    23,658.92
    +183.66 (+0.78%)
     
  • CRUDE OIL

    65.56
    -0.62 (-0.94%)
     
  • GOLD FUTURES

    1,784.80
    +8.30 (+0.47%)
     
  • DOW

    34,022.04
    -461.68 (-1.34%)
     
  • BTC-GBP

    42,705.62
    -527.75 (-1.22%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,444.66
    -24.42 (-1.66%)
     
  • ^IXIC

    15,254.05
    -283.64 (-1.83%)
     
  • ^FTAS

    4,089.19
    +63.32 (+1.57%)
     

Hydrogen-powered Ineos Grenadier concept to use Hyundai fuel cell tech

·2-min read

A hydrogen-powered concept of the new Ineos Grenadier is set to use fuel cell technology from Hyundai.

The move has come through a memorandum of understanding signed between the two companies in November last year.

As part of the agreement, Hyundai and Ineos said that they would jointly investigate hydrogen production and supply options.

Now, it has been confirmed that Ineos will produce a hydrogen-powered concept of its new Grenadier off-roader. Though the details surrounding the technology have been as-yet-unannounced, it could be based upon that currently being used in the Hyundai Nexo. With a 95kWh fuel cell and a 159bhp electric motor, it’s capable of delivering up to 414 miles per hydrogen fill-up.

Though just a concept for now, there’s a good chance that it could lead to a production-ready version of the hydrogen Grenadier.

Sir Jim Ratcliffe, Ineos founder and chairman, said: “We believe that hydrogen is the fuel of the future and Ineos is determined to take a leading role in its development. When used in a fuel cell, hydrogen only produces water and is the UK’s best chance of reaching its carbon reduction targets”.

Ineos has already made significant commitments to hydrogen, having pledged €2 billion (£1.7bn) towards popularising it as a fuel source. Today, the firm launched a ‘hydrogen advocacy’ campaign to boost awareness of hydrogen as a clean fuel source. Ineos is ideally placed to champion the fuel, too, given that it claims to be the ‘biggest operator of electrolysis needed to produce clean, low carbon hydrogen’ in Europe.

Sir Jim added: “Electric cars are ideal for city centres and short journeys. But hydrogen is much better for longer journeys and heavier loads and that requires immediate investment in hydrogen distribution and hydrogen filling stations.”

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting