UK markets open in 1 hour 27 minutes
  • NIKKEI 225

    29,683.75
    -155.96 (-0.52%)
     
  • HANG SENG

    24,221.54
    +122.40 (+0.51%)
     
  • CRUDE OIL

    70.51
    -0.05 (-0.07%)
     
  • GOLD FUTURES

    1,778.50
    +0.30 (+0.02%)
     
  • DOW

    33,919.84
    -50.63 (-0.15%)
     
  • BTC-GBP

    30,869.89
    -260.56 (-0.84%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,046.51
    -17.33 (-1.63%)
     
  • ^IXIC

    14,746.40
    +32.49 (+0.22%)
     
  • ^FTAS

    4,029.01
    +42.11 (+1.06%)
     

Jamie Lee Curtis Says People Should 'Live a Present Life' as She Celebrates 22 Years of Sobriety

·3-min read
Jamie Lee Curtis
Jamie Lee Curtis

Todd Williamson/NBC/Getty

Jamie Lee Curtis is loving life and celebrating her sobriety!

While chatting with AARP The Magazine for their August/September 2021 issue, the 62-year-old actress opened up about her sobriety journey and provided advice for others looking to overcome addiction.

Detailing how her sobriety has lasted over two decades, the Knives Out star told the outlet, "I've been sober 22 years, off of an alcohol and pain pill addiction."

"The process of being a sober person puts you in the one day at a time mentality," she continued, before sharing some words of wisdom for others.

"Try to forget about the past, because you can't do anything about it anyway," she said. "And try to live a present life."

RELATED: Jamie Lee Curtis Opens Up on Being Sober for 22 Years: 'I Was as Sick as My Secrets'

Jamie lee curtis -AARP cover
Jamie lee curtis -AARP cover

Brian Bowen Smith

Curtis has a family history of addiction. Her father, actor Tony Curtis, struggled with alcohol, cocaine and heroin addiction, while her half-brother, Nicholas Curtis, died from a heroin overdose in 1994.

In 2018, the actress opened up to PEOPLE about her 10-year opioid addiction, sharing that she was first prescribed opiates in 1989 after minor plastic surgery "for my hereditary puffy eyes."

According to Curtis, she spent the next decade getting painkillers any way she could — even stealing pills from friends and family, including her older sister Kelly, who was the first person to find out about her addiction in 1998.

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE's free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from juicy celebrity news to compelling human interest stories.

Jamie Lee Curtis
Jamie Lee Curtis

Michael Tullberg/Getty Jamie Lee Curtis

"I was ahead of the curve of the opiate epidemic," Curtis said. "I had a 10-year run, stealing, conniving. No one knew. No one."

Curtis attended her first recovery meeting in February 1999. She told her husband of 36 years, actor-director Christopher Guest, about her addiction that day.

"I'm breaking the cycle that has basically destroyed the lives of generations in my family," Curtis told PEOPLE. "Getting sober remains my single greatest accomplishment … bigger than my husband, bigger than both of my children and bigger than any work, success, failure. Anything."

RELATED VIDEO: Jamie Lee Curtis Opens Up About Opioid Addiction She Hid for 10 Years: 'No One Knew'

Earlier this year, Curtis reflected on her past struggles with addiction in an Instagram post, writing alongside a throwback photo of herself holding a glass of alcohol, "A LONG time ago… In a galaxy far, far away… I was a young STAR at WAR with herself."

"I didn't know it then. I chased everything. I kept it hidden. I was as sick as my secrets," she continued, before showing her appreciation for those who've helped her to get sober.

"With God's grace and the support of MANY people who could relate to all the 'feelings' and a couple of sober angels...I've been able to stay sober, one day at a time, for 22 years," she wrote. "I was a high bottom, pun kind of intended, so the rare photo of me proudly drinking in a photo op is very useful to help me remember."

"To all those struggling and those who are on the path…MY HAND IN YOURS," Curtis added, referencing her charity.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, please contact the SAMHSA substance abuse helpline at 1-800-662-HELP.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting