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London and New York financial services treated the same, EU says

Huw Jones
·2-min read
EU flags flutter outside the European Commission headquarters in Brussels

By Huw Jones

LONDON (Reuters) - An EU forum for discussing financial services with Britain will be similar to what the United States has, and it must be in place before market access will be considered, the bloc's financial services chief said on Monday.

Britain's Brexit trade deal with the EU from Jan. 1 does not cover financial services, leaving its City of London financial center largely cut off from the EU.

Both sides are committed to creating a forum for financial regulatory cooperation by March, but talks have not started yet, the EU financial services commissioner told the European Parliament.

"What we envisage for this framework is similar to what we have with the United States, a voluntary structure to compare regulatory initiatives, exchange views on international developments and discuss equivalence related issues," Mairead McGuinness told the European Parliament.

U.S. and EU regulators took about four years just to agree on rules on cross-border derivatives.

Trading in euro shares has already left London, along with a chunk in swaps trading. That questions the value of any future EU access given that many banks and trading platforms from the UK have opened units in the bloc.

McGuinness said regulatory cooperation will not be about restoring market access that Britain has lost, nor will it constrain the EU's unilateral equivalence process.

Equivalence refers to EU access when Brussels deems a non-EU country's rules are similar enough to the bloc's.

"Once we agree on our working arrangements, we can turn to resuming our unilateral equivalence assessments... using the same criteria as with all third countries, including anti-money laundering and taxation cooperation," she said.

Britain plans to amend some EU rules.

"The United Kingdom intention to diverge requires a case-by-case discussion in each area. Equivalence and divergence are polar opposites," McGuinness said.

"I am optimistic that over time, through cooperation and trust, we will build a stable and balanced relationship with our UK friends."

(Reporting by Huw Jones; Editing by Dan Grebler)