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Man builds enormous 27,000,000mah ‘portable’ battery that can charge 5,000 phones

·2-min read
 (Handy Geng/YouTube)
(Handy Geng/YouTube)

A YouTuber has built a 27,000,000 mAh power bank capable of charging 5,000 smartphones.

In the video, Handy Geng (real name Geng Shuai) claims he built the enormous battery – which measures 180 centimetres by 120 centimetres by 30 centimetres – because he was envious of the large capacity of his friends’ external batteries.

In total, the large power pack is the equivalent of around 900 commercial packs. It has 60 three-pin sockets on it, rather than the USB Type A usually found on commercial products.

The bank can also charge electric bicycles for “roadside assistance” - although Mr Geng needed to tie a rope to it to pull it along – and can also supply household white goods like cookers, washing machines, and televisions.

“With this power bank, you don’t need to worry at all about lacking electricity when outdoors,” Mr Geng says. “You’ll never need to worry about a power outage again.”

Many scientists are attempting to extend the life of modern batteries – albeit without making them as huge as Mr Geng’s.

Researchers from the University of Michigan recently used recycled Kevlar – the same material found in bullet-proof vests – to create a network of nanofibres similar to a cell membrane that could make electric car batteries last five times as long.

General Motors is also building a new electric vehicle battery lab to halve costs and let drivers travel up to 600 miles on a single charge.

We need to make better batteries that cost a lot less,” said Tim Grewe, GM’s director of battery cell engineering and strategy, in October 2021.

Eventually, it is hoped smartphone batteries will last for up to five years. Researchers are currently looking into ways to stop the degradation of the cells and better utilising charging cycles.

Longer-lasting batteries could have significant impact for medical technologies as well, as patients with artificial organs would benefit from medical equipment that lasts longer, with great economic and environmental gains too.

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