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Meghan Trainor opens up about why she 'doesn’t like' pregnancy sex

Marie Claire Dorking
·5-min read
Meghan Trainor has opened up about sex during pregnancy, pictured in October 2020. (Getty Images)
Meghan Trainor has opened up about sex during pregnancy, pictured in October 2020. (Getty Images)

Meghan Trainor has revealed pregnancy is putting her off having sex, as she doesn’t like the idea of her unborn baby being between her and her husband.

The singer, who is around six months pregnant with her first child, a boy, opened up about the intimate topic during an interview with TODAY Parents.

“Maybe this is weird, but mentally I can’t have sex while our son is in between us,” said Trainor, 26.

“All my pregnancy apps say it feels really good. But all I can think about is that there’s a little boy in my belly.”

Read more: Tinnitus: The lesser-known pregnancy symptom that impacts one in three women

Thankfully, switching from sex to snuggling hasn’t impacted her relationship with her husband Spy Kids star Daryl Sabara, in fact according to Trainor, things have never been better.

Watch: Meghan Trainor is expecting a baby boy

“Our relationship really messes with my girlfriends’ minds. They’re all like, ‘How the hell am I going to find a Daryl?’” she said. “He’s so good. He’s unbelievable.”

Trainor went on to reveal that her husband was happy to help satisfy her pregnancy food cravings during her first trimester.

“If I said, ‘I want Fritos,’ he’d be like, ‘Yes, ma’am! Right away!’” Trainor said.

Trainor’s experience of going off sex while pregnant certainly isn’t unusual. A parenting poll by ChannelMum.com previously revealed that one in six couples abstain from having sex during the entire nine months of pregnancy.

The survey, of 2,000 parents, found that many couples avoided sex during pregnancy out of concern that they might ‘hurt’ the baby.

While a further one in 10 felt it was just plain wrong to have sex with a baby on the way, – which, when you think about it, is slightly odd, considering how the baby likely got there in the first place.

The survey found that couples tend to fall into two camps when it comes to getting intimate during pregnancy.

For some their sex life continues entirely as normal right up until they give birth, but for others sex is put on the no-go list the minute they get a positive pregnancy test.

Watch: 5 top tips for new parents

Is it safe to have sex while pregnant?

According to the NHS it is perfectly safe to have sex during pregnancy unless your doctor or midwife has told you not to.

Having sex will not hurt your baby, and the baby cannot tell what's going on.

Dr Shree Datta, gynaecologist for women’s intimate health brand Intimina says: “In most cases, it’s perfectly natural and safe to have sex during pregnancy. Your baby has a protective cushion of fluid around him or her, so they will not be affected by sex if your pregnancy is normal.”

Read more: Dani Dyer shares reality of pregnancy migraines

But there are certain circumstances which might mean a pregnant women is advised to avoid sex.

“You may be advised to avoid sex if you have been experiencing vaginal bleeding or if your placenta is low-lying,” Dr Datta continues.

“In some cases, ultrasound may show a collection of blood (haematoma) in which case you may again be advised to avoid sex as this may trigger bleeding.

“If you have broken your waters or have previously delivered babies early, you may also be advised to avoid penetrative sex.”

The NHS also advises avoiding sex during pregnancy if:

  • your waters have broken – as it can increase the risk of infection (ask your midwife or doctor if you’re not sure whether your waters have broken)

  • there are any problems with the entrance to your womb (cervix) – you may be at a higher risk of going into early labour or having a miscarriage

  • you’re having twins, or have previously had early labours, and are in the later stages of pregnancy.

Changes in libido during pregnancy

It’s totally normal for your sex drive to change during pregnancy and while some mums-to-be will find they experience a dip in libido, for others pregnancy can increase their sex drive.

“The hormonal changes that women go through during pregnancy can impact women in many ways, and an increase in blood flow can make breasts, nipples and the genital area feel more sensitive which for some women can in turn increase sex drive,” explains Kate Moyle, sex and relationship expert for LELO.

“It’s completely individual because pregnancy is such a combination of bodily changes, hormonal changes, and psychological changes; some women experience a real boost in their interest in sex, and for others they feel like their desire really plummets and they aren't interested at all.”

Read more: Rochelle Humes opens up about back pain struggle due to 'massive pregnancy boobs'

Good sex positions during pregnancy

While sex is safe for most couples in pregnancy, it can sometimes be a bit tricky during the later stages and you may need to experiment to find more comfortable positions.

According to Moyle, what is possible and not possible throughout certain stages of pregnancy is going to change as your body changes.

“For some women positions where the woman is on top, like cowgirl or reverse cowgirls, can help her in feeling more in control of the depth and speed of penetration, and also in being able to more comfortably shift or move your body weight around, but you may also notice that you get tired quicker,” she explains.

“Spooning is another great position for navigating around a bump, which can also allow for clitoral stimulation.”

Moyle also suggests focusing on forms of non-penetrative sex, which can help you to experience pleasure without any pressure on intercourse.

“Remember that you can use things like pillows to support you, your hips, your stomach or wherever you need them, and don't be worried about having to move things around or change positions in a way that you are not used to doing pre-pregnancy,” she explains.