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Nirvana to Rerelease 'In Utero' Album for 30th Anniversary with 53 Unreleased Songs from the Rock Band

The 1993 album will be reissued this year in several physical formats and feature two unreleased concert recordings, previously unseen photos and more

Kevin Mazur Archive/WireImage Dave Grohl, Kurt Cobain and Krist Novoselic of Nirvana
Kevin Mazur Archive/WireImage Dave Grohl, Kurt Cobain and Krist Novoselic of Nirvana

Nirvana's "Heart-Shaped Box" is opening back up to share more music with fans.

On Tuesday, record labels Geffen and UMe announced the iconic grunge-rock band's third and final album In Utero will be rereleased for its 30th anniversary later this month in several new editions jam-packed with unreleased songs and photos.

Originally released in 1993 as a 12-track album, In Utero marked Nirvana's first project to debut atop of the Billboard Hot 100. Now, the body of work will be reissued in several formats: 8LP super deluxe box set, 5CD super deluxe box set, 1LP + 10" edition, 2CD edition and digital super deluxe edition.

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Related: Dave Grohl 'Still Dreams' He's in Nirvana, Reveals Why He Won't Sing Kurt Cobain's Songs on His Own

Each super deluxe version features 72 tracks in total, including 53 unreleased tracks comprised of two live concerts held around the In Utero release — 1993's Live in Los Angeles and 1994's Live in Seattle, the band's final hometown show — and six other live tracks performed around the same time in Rome, Italy; Springfield, Massachusetts; and New York.

The physical super deluxe versions of In Utero: 30th Anniversary features the album and live recordings pressed on 180-gram vinyl, as well as an acrylic panel of the cover's angel, 48-page book with unreleased photos, new 20-page fanzine, Los Angeles concert lithograph, two ticket stubs, replicas of the promotional Angel mobile, three concert flyers, an all-access tour laminate and four backstage passes.

However, the physical super deluxe versions are limited to 3000 copies worldwide, so head to uDiscovermusic.com and SoundofVinyl.com quickly to purchase.

Related: Inside Kurt Cobain's Tragic Suicide 25 Years After the Nirvana Legend's Death

Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic Nirvana
Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic Nirvana

In Utero marked the third album from the band — comprised of Kurt CobainKrist Novoselic and Dave Grohl — and unfortunately became the final album of original material they'd ever create together, as Cobain died by suicide at his Seattle home after a lengthy battle with drugs and depression at age 27 on April 5, 1994.

In a 2013 interview with Rolling Stone, Grohl opened up about creating the album and why it'd become hard for him to listen to its songs. "The album should be listened to as it was the day it came out. That’s my problem with the record. I used to like to listen to it. And I don’t anymore, because of that," he told the outlet.

The Foo Fighters frontman continued, "To me, if you listen to it without thinking of Kurt dying, you might get the original intention of the record. Like my kids. They know I was in Nirvana. They know Kurt was killed. I haven’t told them that he killed himself. They’re four and seven years old. So when they listen to In Utero, they’ll have that fresh perspective – the original intention of the album, as a first-time listener."

"Someday they will learn what happened. And it’ll change that. It did for me," added Grohl.

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Read the original article on People.