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OPINION - Who should pay for the school concrete crisis?: The Leader podcast

Hundreds of schools nationwide have been affected by issues with concrete (Jacob King/PA) (PA Wire)
Hundreds of schools nationwide have been affected by issues with concrete (Jacob King/PA) (PA Wire)

As the new term officially begins, there’s a row over who will shoulder the burden of paying to repair all the schools affected by the concrete crisis.

The start of the new academic year saw dozens of schools in England fully, or partially closed, due to potentially unsafe reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete - also known as RAAC.

The lightweight material was used in schools between the 1950s to 1990s, because it’s cheaper, quicker to produce, and easier to install than standard concrete. However, it’s less durable and only has a lifespan of around 30 years.

Now, the government is under pressure to publish a full list of buildings that are impacted, and Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has hit back at those blaming him for the crisis.

The Evening Standard’s Deputy Political Editor, Jitendra Joshi, shares his insight from Westminster.

Listen above, and find us on your Spotify Daily Drive or wherever you stream your podcasts.