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Pilot scheme to give AI regulation advice to businesses

A new online hub has been launched to help AI developers access informal advice on how to properly develop and release AI models.

The Government-funded AI and Digital Hub, which will initially be launched as a pilot scheme, has been backed by around £2 million in funding and will bring together guidance from four regulators on how to navigate the regulatory environment.

It is being created by the Digital Regulation Co-operation Forum (DRCF), a group of four key regulators linked to AI – the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) and Ofcom.

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology (DSIT) said the new hub would help make it easier for businesses to get the help they need to bring their AI technology to market responsibly and more quickly, which it said in turn would help grow the economy.

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As laid out in the AI White Paper, first published last year, the Government has chosen to use existing regulators to take on the role of monitoring artificial intelligence use within their own sectors rather than creating a new, central regulator dedicated to the emerging technology.

Ministers have argued this is a more agile approach to the issue.

Technology Secretary Michelle Donelan said the hub scheme would help further refine that approach.

“AI innovations are already transforming how we tackle and diagnose diseases like cancer, improving our public services, and ramping up productivity. It is the defining technology of our generation,” she said.

“Through the AI and Digital Hub, we can bring groundbreaking innovators together with our expert regulators to streamline the process of harnessing the technology’s incredible potential.

“Our regulatory approach to AI places innovation at its heart, and this pilot scheme will play a vital role in helping us to refine that approach both now and in the years to come.”

The DSIT said the hub pilot scheme will run for 12 months, with a decision on its potential long-term future expected in 2025.