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Prime Minister submits plans for fence around his home following protest

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has submitted plans to build a fence around his country home following a protest by Greenpeace activists earlier this year.

The application, to North Yorkshire Council, says the wooden fence is to “provide a simple visual and modest physical barrier to discourage incursion onto the residential property”.

It follows a protest by Greenpeace in August that saw activists demonstrating on the roof of the grade II-listed mansion.

Campaigners draped the property with oil-black fabric to protest against the Government’s plans to grant more than 100 new licences for oil and gas extraction in the North Sea.

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Five people were arrested by officers from North Yorkshire Police following the protest, which took place while Mr Sunak and his family were on holiday in California.

Greenpeace protest at Rishi Sunak house
Greenpeace activists on the roof of Prime Minister Rishi Sunak’s house (Danny Lawson/PA)

A planning application, which is currently awaiting a decision, to erect a “a timber post and rail fence” measuring 165ft long and 4ft high was submitted on October 11.

The document states that it has been made: “with the intention to provide a simple visual and modest physical barrier to discourage incursion onto the residential property”.

It adds: “It is considered that the proposal gives rise to no perceivable harm in heritage terms or from a wider planning perspective and planning permission should be duly granted.”

The application calls for “a prompt decision given the simplicity of the proposals and site circumstances”.

The Mail On Sunday, which first reported the application, said Downing Street had confirmed that Mr Sunak would pay for the fence himself.