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R rate falls as Covid infections drop to lowest number since autumn

Tammy Hughes
·1-min read
<p>Last week the figure was estimated to between 0.8 and 1</p> (REUTERS)

Last week the figure was estimated to between 0.8 and 1

(REUTERS)

England’s R number had fallen slightly to between 0.7 and 1.

Last week the figure was estimated to between 0.8 and 1 by the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE).

R represents the average number of people a person with the virus goes on to infect. When the figure is above 1, it means the virus is spreading and could become out of control.

New figures have also revealed that Covid-19 infections across all parts of the UK have fallen to the lowest level since the autumn.

According to the latest estimates from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), around one in 480 people in private households in England had Covid-19 in the week to April 10 – down from one in 340 the previous week.

This is the lowest figure since the week to September 19 2020, when the estimate stood at one in 500.

Meanwhile in Wales, around one in 920 people was estimated to have had coronavirus in the week to April 10 – down from one in 800 in the week before and the lowest level since the week to September 10.

This is the lowest figure since the week to September 19 2020REUTERS
This is the lowest figure since the week to September 19 2020REUTERS

In Northern Ireland, the estimate was around one in 710 people, a drop from one in 300 in the previous week and the lowest since estimates began for the nation in October.

The estimate for Scotland was around one in 500, falling from one in 410 and again the lowest since estimates began for the nation in October.

The drop in infection levels across the UK sets it apart from other countries across the world where cases are surging.

India reported a record 200,000 new cases of the virus on Thursday, while much of continental Europe remains in lockdown.

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