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The Reason You Should Never Freeze Canned Goods And Sodas

Beverage can in the freezer
Beverage can in the freezer - Aphichart/Shutterstock

There's one place you should never store your six-pack of soda -- or any canned goods for that matter -- and that's in the freezer. It seems like a no-brainer, but it happens to the best of us. When you're hot and thirsty and you want something cool to refresh your palate, nothing beats an ice-cold Coke or orange Fanta, but putting a can in the freezer and forgetting about it could lead to less immediate gratification and the need to clean up an exploding mess.

When you put cans of soda or other goods in a freezer that contain liquid, those liquids expand (for example, water expands by a rate of 9%), and if there is no room in the can to account for that needed space, the can is likely to explode in the freezer -- or when you go to crack it open. Either way, it is messy, problematic, and unsafe.

Read more: 20 Popular Canned Soups, Ranked Worst To Best

Ice, Water, And Salt

Can in ice
Can in ice - Grandriver/Getty Images

It isn't just the freezing water that causes problems. When it comes to soda, it's all about carbonation. When you place that can of Sprite or Topo Chico canned cocktail in the freezer, the water and carbon dioxide separate as the water freezes. Carbon dioxide has to get to -109.3 degrees Fahrenheit to transform into dry ice, which isn't likely to happen in your home freezer. However, once you've frozen the water in the can, you've also pushed all the carbon dioxide into a small space, creating more pressure. That's when things can get dangerous.

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So what should you do instead? If you need to chill something quickly, turn to ice, salt, and water to make your cool-sipping dreams become a reality. You just need a container large enough to hold what you are trying to cool, along with a mix of half ice and half water, and about a half cup of table salt. Place your cans in this for as little as 15 minutes and you will be enjoying a nice, cold beverage in no time.

Read the original article on Tasting Table.