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“Siri, make me a latte”: What numerous London office staff would like to be able to say in HQs

·2-min read
<p>Offices firm Orega has installed a touchless coffee machine at one of its sites</p> (Orega)

Offices firm Orega has installed a touchless coffee machine at one of its sites

(Orega)

“Siri, make me a coffee” is what numerous London office staff would like to be able to say in HQs, according to a study that shows 60% plan on hybrid working post-pandemic.

Some 34% of office workers in the capital want self-service touchless drinks machines, where you can order a latte via an app, for example. That could mean less people touching kettles, and make some places potentially feel more Covid-secure.

The findings came from a Survation poll, commissioned by serviced offices group Orega, of 2000 office workers and 500 business leaders. Of these 378 and 124 respectively operate in the capital.

The report said half of London firms are planning to move their model to a mixture of home and office hours, while three fifths of staff plan on this way of working. Before the Covid-19 crisis, 22% worked this way.

Bosses across various sectors are looking at whether to decrease office space, upgrade sites, relocate or exit them. That follows more than a year of working from home in some cases.

Orega’s survey said 15% of London business leaders would prefer staff work remotely.

Zach Douglas, chief executive of Orega, which has installed a touchless coffee machine in its Old Bailey site, said: “Brits have chosen to go back to the office but on their own terms and businesses are accepting it. It seems the hybrid model working mostly in the office and then remotely from home is here to stay.”

Guidance around working from home is set to relax later this month.

Earlier this week, the Evening Standard reported that almost half of mid-to-large size UK companies plan to move offices within the next three years as the shift to flexible working outlasts the pandemic.

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