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‘Stormzy’ the badger released into wild after being rescued from bad weather

·1-min read

A weather-beaten badger named Stormzy has been released back into the wild after the RSPCA came to its aid.

The male cub was found on May 25 by locals in Bures, Suffolk, having collapsed cold, wet and barely conscious.

Stormzy the badger cub made a swift recovery after being found in a bad state after bad weather in Suffolk
(RSPCA)

His rescuers managed to place him in a cardboard box with a blanket around him before the RSPCA arrived on the scene.

RSPCA inspector Jess Dayes took the animal to Wildlives Rescue and Rehabilitation Centre in Thorrington, near Colchester, where he received treatment.

After being placed in a warm-up tank and given fluids and milk, Stormzy – named by the wildlife centre – was soon on the mend.

“He was soon feeding properly, and amazingly, within a couple of hours, he was bright as a button and growling at us,” said Ms Dayes.

Stormzy the badger cub made a swift recovery after being found in a bad state after bad weather in Suffolk
(RSPCA)

Within a few days, the badger was well enough to be released back to his home territory, thanks to the help of the Suffolk Badger Group, who identified the sett it came from.

The RSPCA advises that members of the public should not handle troubled badgers, but should contact the RSPCA instead on 0300 1234 999.

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