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Swap rice, wheat with 12 traditional grains; see the difference in ONE year

·5-min read

Are you concerned that you'll have to live on brownish oats and wheat to avoid gluten for the rest of your life? Not all popular and nutritious substitutes for white rice or spaghetti are as simple as this. For many years, the majority of the world's population has consumed naturally healthy foods.

What exactly is a ‘traditional grain’? These are plants that have survived the commercial harvesting of current crops such as rice, wheat, and maize.

Traditional grains are abundant in vitamins and fiber, making them one of the most recent and beneficial superfoods! They are nutrient-dense, and yet their rustic tastes and abrasive qualities have encouraged many gourmet cooks to experiment with them. They're also less complicated to cook at home than macaroni or plain rice.

Substitute rice and wheat for these traditional, out-of-the-ordinary grains to spice up your dinner while still delivering essential nutrients. You'll see a difference in a matter of months!

Amaranth

Raw Organic Amaranth grainwith a spoon on a wooden table
Raw Organic Amaranth grainwith a spoon on a wooden table

A gluten-free pseudo-cereal with a unique protein content different from any other cereals that have been cultivated in South Asia since 4000 BC. It is also the only grain containing vitamin C and lysine (an essential amino acid lacking in most grains).

· Bhutanese Red Rice

Oryza sativa is scientific name of Bhutanese Red Rice seed. Also known as Arroz Vemelho (portuguese). Top view of grains in a bowl. White background.
Oryza sativa is scientific name of Bhutanese Red Rice seed. Also known as Arroz Vemelho (portuguese). Top view of grains in a bowl. White background.

Bhutanese Red Rice, reddish Himalayan heritage rice, has been produced for thousands of years in the fertile soil of the Paro Valley. Minerals (magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphorus) in the glacier water-irrigated soil provide the natural crimson hue in this nutrient-rich grain. Chefs will enjoy this gluten-free culinary hero's quick preparation time and solid and earthy tastes.

· Buckwheat

Buckwheat seeds on wooden spoon in closeup
Buckwheat seeds on wooden spoon in closeup

Buckwheat has been around for over 9,000 years, and it was one of the earliest crops grown by early American colonists. Buckwheat, as the name implies, is a pyramid-shaped fruit seed, not wheat. It is gluten-free, heart-healthy, and high in soluble fiber, essential for blood sugar control.

· Chak Hao

Wild black (purple rice, chak-hao) Rice background
Wild black (purple rice, chak-hao) Rice background

Permitted rice, also known as chak hao, is a rare and nutritious grain that shares many health benefits with blueberries, grapes, and acai berries. It is now grown in northeast India (especially Manipur), China, and Southeast Asia. When cooked, chak hao takes on a vivid purple color. Manipuri black rice kheer is a delicious dessert made with this heart-healthy rice.

· Chia

Chia seeds in wooden bowl
Chia seeds in wooden bowl

Chia seeds have been prized by the Aztecs for generations and are a typical food in Central American countries. Chia seeds are the next best thing to quinoa since they are high in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Chia seeds, like tapioca, gelatinize when soaked in liquid, making them ideal as a gluten-free binder or as a topping for a delightful vegan pudding.

· Fonio

Raw uncooked fonio seeds with a spoon on grey background close up
Raw uncooked fonio seeds with a spoon on grey background close up

Fonio is West Africa's oldest grain, and it is claimed to be drought-resistant and high in amino acids. Despite being the smallest grain in the millet family with over 2000 grains per gram, it is gluten-free and mineral-rich. Fonio is a good choice for people with diabetes since it slows digestion and aids with blood sugar regulation.

· Freekeh

Uncooked Freekeh in a Bowl
Uncooked Freekeh in a Bowl

Young wheat that has been gathered while it is still green is known as Freekeh. Because of its nutritional advantages, it has long been a staple in many Mediterranean countries. It tastes smoky, nutty, and chewy. Unlike other grains, freekeh has a significant amount of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals while also having a low glycaemic index.

· Khorasan wheat

Raw Kamut grain in a wooden bowl with a spoon
Raw Kamut grain in a wooden bowl with a spoon

Khorasan, a distant relative of modern durum wheat, is said to have originated in Mesopotamia. In Turkey, the grain is known as ‘Prophet's Wheat’ or ‘Camel's Tooth’ due to its shape. They are twice the size of wheat kernels and have a creamy flavor. Khorasan is a natural alternative to modern wheat products since it is high in protein and minerals.

· Job's Tears

Closeup white Job's tears ( Adlay millet or pearl millet ) in wooden bowl and scoop isolated on old rustic wood table background background ,Top view. Flat lay
Closeup white Job's tears ( Adlay millet or pearl millet ) in wooden bowl and scoop isolated on old rustic wood table background background ,Top view. Flat lay

This traditional grain is a plump, chewy East Asian grain named after the form of a teardrop. They are also known as hato mugi (Chinese barley rice) and coix seeds. It is used in traditional Chinese medicine and beverages. This item works well in soups and salads because of its high fiber content and somewhat nutty flavor.

· Millets

Millet is a genus of small seed grains in the Poaceae grass family. This gluten-free grain is high in nutrients. Millet is a versatile grain that can be used in making porridge, mashed potatoes, or rice. In addition to bread and dough, it may be ground into flour.

· Spelt

This sweet-tasting and crisp grain was a medieval staple before becoming an excellent nutritional mainstay in Central Europe and northern Spain. It is enriched with iron, vitamin A, and heart-healthy Niacin since it is more complex than regular husks. It is simpler to digest than wheat because of its lower gluten level.

· Teff

Sacks of dry seeds and cereals for sale at Bati market, Amhara Region, Oromia, Ethiopia, Africa
Sacks of dry seeds and cereals for sale at Bati market, Amhara Region, Oromia, Ethiopia, Africa

Around 150 times smaller than a single wheat kernel, Teff has been used for thousands of years in Ethiopia. When crushed into flour, it is used to make injera, an Ethiopian staple. Teff is a whole grain that cannot be husked. And so the same comes packed with more nutrients. Teff is a fiber-rich grain with a sweet, molasses-like taste used to produce a delicious gluten-free thickener.

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