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Tesla has increased the price of its 'Full Self-Driving' option to $10,000

Darrell Etherington
·2-min read

Tesla has made good on founder and CEO Elon Musk's promise to boost the price of its "Full Self-Driving" (FSD) software upgrade option, increasing it to $10,000 following the start of the staged rollout of a beta version of the software update last week. This boosts the price of the package $2,000 from its price before today, and it has steadily increased since last May.

The FSD option has been available as an optional add-on to complement Tesla's Autopilot driver assistance technology, even though the features themselves haven't been available to Tesla owners before the launch of the beta this month. Even still, it's only in limited beta, but this is the closest Musk and Tesla have come to actually launching something under the FSD moniker -- after having teased a fully autonomous mode in production Teslas for years now.

Despite its name, FSD isn't what most in the industry would define as full, Level 4 or Level 5, autonomy per the standards defined by SAE International and accepted by most working on self-driving. Musk has designed it as vehicles having the ability "to be autonomous but requiring supervision and intervention at times," whereas Levels 4 and 5 (often considered "true self-driving") under SAE standards require no driver intervention.

Still, the technology does appear impressive in some ways according to early user feedback -- though testing any kind of self-driving software unsupervised via the general public does seem an incredibly risky move. Musk has said that we should see a wide rollout of the FSD tech beyond the beta before year's end, so he definitely seems confident in its performance.

The price increase might be another sign of his and the company's confidence. Musk has always maintained that users were getting a discount by handing money over early to Tesla in order to help it develop technology that would come later, so in many ways it makes sense that the price increase comes now. This also obviously helps Tesla boost margins, though it's already riding high on earnings that beat both revenue and profit expectations from analysts.