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From test strips to hotlines, how to protect against fentanyl and treat a drug addiction

From test strips to hotlines, how to protect against fentanyl and treat a drug addiction
A stock photo shows a bag of cocaine with lines of the drug.
A stock photo shows a bag of cocaine with lines of the drug.Getty Images
  • BI spoke to 13 financial professionals about drugs on Wall Street, from cocaine to psychedelics.

  • The conversations come amid a rise in substance abuse and drug overdose deaths.

  • Here is a list of resources, from where to buy Naloxone to ordering fentanyl test strips online.

There are many reasons people use drugs, from coping with stress to legitimate medical needs. Business Insider just spoke with more than a dozen Wall Street professionals who said drugs remain a part of the culture, especially for high-intensity jobs like trading, or executives tasked with entertaining clients.

But frequent drug use can lead to addiction, while any drug can lead to death if it is laced with deadly fentanyl.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in seven Americans reports experiencing a substance use disorder, which the agency defines as impairment or distress resulting from regular substance use. Meanwhile, drug overdose deaths were recently tallied at over 100,000, double where they were in 2015. More than 70,000 of the deaths were the result of what was "primarily fentanyl," according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, thanks in large part to fentanyl, which is increasingly being added to street drugs like cocaine.

Despite its wide-ranging impact on Americans, addiction can be treated and prevented with education and awareness, as well as support from family, friends, and colleagues. And overdose deaths can be avoided with tools like fentanyl testing strips.

BI has compiled here a list of resources for people looking to avoid or treat addiction and manage the risk of death by overdose:

  • SAMSHSA's National Helpline is a free and confidential phone service designed to help families and individuals facing mental and/or substance use disorders. It is open 365/24/7 to offer treatment referrals and information services and does not require health insurance.

  • Naloxone is a medication that can reverse an overdose from opioids like heroin, fentanyl, or opiate medications. It can also come in handy when using other drugs; about two-thirds of cocaine overdoses have fentanyl or opioids in them, according to the CDC. In the US, Naloxone can come in the form of a nasal spray, often under the brand Narcan. Naloxone is available over the counter without a prescription. Here is a list of New York City pharmacies where Naloxone can be purchased, or call 311 to find out where to get Naloxone at no cost.

  • Fentanyl test strips can be used to detect the presence of harmful additives, like fentanyl, in drugs. New Yorkers can order test strips online here, according to New York State's Office of Addiction Services and Supports.

  • NYC Addiction Services helps connect New York residents to specialized addiction treatment centers in the Tri-state area. The 24/7 confidential helpline (833-394-7511) can refer individuals to a variety of programs, from inpatient treatment and detox to outpatient programs.

Read the original article on Business Insider