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These are the best cities in the UK to find work in right now

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Job vacancies hit a nine month high in July, with salaries sizzling and candidate applications also reaching boiling point.

Data from job board CV-library shows job vacancies across the UK rose 5.3% year-on-year, but key cities saw above-average growth, making them prime locations for job-seekers right now.

Cardiff and Edinburgh are the best places to look for a job at the moment. Vacancies in the Welsh and Scottish capitals are up 16% from 2018, the job market data shows.

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However, Glasgow is not far behind, with vacancies up 15% over the year.

Job seekers may also want to consider heading to Leeds or Southampton, where vacancies have shot up 11%, Portsmouth, where they are up 10%, or Bristol, where they are up 9%.

London appeared further down the list, with jobs being advertised in the capital up 8% from last year, while Inverness and Manchester just made the top 10, with vacancies up 7% and 6%, respectively.

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Lee Biggins, founder and CEO of CV-Library, said: Employers have been upping their recruiting efforts and clearly, candidates have been listening.

“Our job market data shows businesses have bucked the trend of slowing down their hiring plans during the quieter summer months, which is paving the way for the UK’s job-hunters.

“These findings are especially positive, considering the mini heatwave we’ve had in the past month. While many Brits would be tempted to take days off to chill out and enjoy the sunshine, it seems that instead they’ve been snapping up the increased jobs on offer.”

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The data also shows average pay packets for new jobs have hit a three-month high and grew by 5.6% year-on-year.

Key cities like Leicester (9.9%), Glasgow (8.4%) and Manchester (6.2%) saw significantly bigger increases.