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This easy to do anywhere workout will make you strong – and happy!

Jayne Cherrington-Cook
·3-min read

Watch: Bodyweight workout focusing on cardio and the upper body

As a self-described ‘chubby blogger’ Georgina Horne celebrates bodies of all sizes. She’s also is very much against diet culture, yet this doesn’t mean she’s not fit – far from it. The Instagram influencer and plus-size model regularly works out but does it for fitness rather than weight loss.

“It's taken me years to get into this headspace,” she says. “I work out for strength, for stamina, for endurance.”

Read more: Vicky Pattison on her body image struggle: 'Please don’t confuse thin with healthy’

She continues: “The aim is to always to just keep moving my body as joyfully as I can, not associating working out with weight loss and shrinking my body because that just leads to negative thoughts. Now, I work out intuitively I would say.”

Various studies over the years have shown that while exercise isn’t always a great option for losing weight, it is beneficial for your overall health. A Cochrane Review found that those people who exercised more may not have lost much weight, but instead saw a range of health improvements, including reducing their blood pressure.

Read more: The many benefits of push-ups

Horne is also keen to show different types of bodies working out, which is something she believes we don’t see enough of. To do this, she has devised three separate workouts for Yahoo! alongside fitness trainer, Gemma Hawes.

On one Instagram post, Horne said the reason she posts so many photos of her working out is to help normalise seeing larger bodies exercising.

View this post on Instagram

Double tap if you like seeing make up free faces like this on your timeline! 😚 • There are so many reasons that I post photos and videos of myself working out. Partly it’s to show you my @sturdybydesign #fffbxsbd collection. Partly it’s to show you the kind of things that I enjoy doing at the gym. Partly it’s to give you variety on my timeline so that you can see a bit more of the day-to-day stuff. And partly it’s to normalise seeing fatter bodies working out and exercising and finding strength and stamina and endorphins. And do you know what I want you to take from all of this? Positives. Maybe you will find some new activewear. Maybe it will help you feel better about how your body looks in the gym. Maybe it will give you some different ideas of exercises that you can do. And maybe it will change the preconceived notions about what fit and strong bodies or just bodies that pick up weights look like. What I really don’t want it to do is cause you to be unkind to yourself about your own activity levels. This isn’t some kind of competition and I don’t get extra points because I happened to have been inside a gym more recently than you. Exercise has to be done intuitively, and we have to be kind to ourselves. I am not a better person for going to the gym and you are not a bad person because you don’t work out as much or in the same way. Please stop telling yourself that eating a certain way or doing other things with your body somehow makes you better than someone who does the opposite. Please stop putting certain behaviours on pedestals and telling yourself off for not doing them. And please remember that social media is a highlight reel and we all see what others want to show us. Be intuitive, and be kind to yourself. Because it’s very hard to respond happily to criticism and harshness 🌈

A post shared by Georgina Horne (@fullerfigurefullerbust) on

“Maybe it will help you feel better about how your body looks in the gym,” she says.

“And maybe it will change the preconceived notions about what fit and strong bodies or just bodies that pick up weights look like.

“What I really don’t want it to do is cause you to be unkind to yourself about your own activity levels. Exercise has to be done intuitively, and we have to be kind to ourselves. I am not a better person for going to the gym and you are not a bad person because you don’t work out as much or in the same way.”

Watch: Easy to follow bodyweight workout focusing on core strength

Read more: Super fit 73-year-old pulls off planks, chin ups and handstands while working out six times a week

All of Horne’s workouts last just 10 minutes and involve intervals of 40 seconds of working out, followed by 20 seconds of rest. You don’t need any equipment, just your body weight, and Horne says they can be done anywhere – which is convenient during this pandemic!

“These are workouts you can do at home,” she says. “You can do at the gym, you can do in a lovely open space like this, get vitamin D and be in the great outdoors whilst working out!”

While Horne is keen to include exercise in her weekly routine, she’s still not a total fitness convert, but she says the key is to find things you like doing!

“I won't go so far as to say I love my workouts and working out, but I definitely don't hate them,” she reveals.

“I definitely avoid workouts that I really don't like, because I don't want to be moving my body in a way that feels torturous, that I don't enjoy. I always try to move it in a way that will feel good at the end of it and I will come back for.”

Watch: Simple bodyweight workout focusing on the lower body