UK markets close in 4 hours 51 minutes
  • FTSE 100

    7,491.80
    -9.09 (-0.12%)
     
  • FTSE 250

    20,362.88
    +23.92 (+0.12%)
     
  • AIM

    932.40
    -0.80 (-0.09%)
     
  • GBP/EUR

    1.1835
    +0.0015 (+0.13%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.2062
    -0.0077 (-0.63%)
     
  • BTC-GBP

    20,040.46
    -537.86 (-2.61%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    573.58
    +2.30 (+0.40%)
     
  • S&P 500

    4,280.15
    +72.88 (+1.73%)
     
  • DOW

    33,761.05
    +424.35 (+1.27%)
     
  • CRUDE OIL

    87.96
    -4.13 (-4.48%)
     
  • GOLD FUTURES

    1,790.40
    -25.10 (-1.38%)
     
  • NIKKEI 225

    28,871.78
    +324.80 (+1.14%)
     
  • HANG SENG

    20,040.86
    -134.76 (-0.67%)
     
  • DAX

    13,788.83
    -7.02 (-0.05%)
     
  • CAC 40

    6,559.10
    +5.24 (+0.08%)
     

TikTok is obsessed with a woman who finds and recreates recipes written on gravestones: ‘I had no idea this was a thing'

·2-min read

A woman is going viral for her unusual hobby — discovering and then re-creating recipes displayed on gravestones.

Rosie Grant is a TikToker (@ghostlyarchive) with a master’s degree in library science and a clear passion for cemeteries. In recent months, that interest has earned her attention from media outlets worldwide.

It’s easy to see why. Grant isn’t fascinated by just gravestones; she’s fascinated by gravestones with recipes on them.

Bitcoin ETFs: What are they and how to invest in them?

The immortalization of recipes through epitaphs is actually more widespread than it seems. The practice exists in countries around the world, and in recent years these recipes have had a knack for going viral on social media.

But Grant seems to be one of the only people committed to archiving these recipes. Her page is full of videos that feature shots of the gravestones themselves, followed by the dishes they’ve recorded.

The idea seems to have started in early 2022, when Grant posted a video captioned, “Going to start making recipes from gravestones.”

In that clip, the TikToker made “spritz cookies,” based on an ingredients list found in Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery. Despite the fact that there were no baking instructions on the tombstone, the cookies seemed to turn out pretty good.

“They’re to die for,” Grant joked in her captions.

This Brooklyn home office gets a California-inspired makeover with just $1,000:

Speaking with the Guardian, Grant said the recipes are hard to come by. At that point — late April 2022 — she said she’d found only 10 or so.

That said, she’s noticed a clear benefit from the hobby. Grant told the outlet that her grandmother recently died of COVID-19. After her death, Grant spent time reflecting on a yellow cake her grandmother made for her as a kid.

“It’s nice to think about the recipes that hold a similar significance for other families,” she said. “Perhaps at gatherings and holidays they know certain dishes will show up.”

TikTok users have had plenty of praise for the idea. However, many had no idea gravestone recipes existed.

“I had no idea this was a thing,” a user commented on her most recent video.

“This is the coolest thing,” another added.

“This is surprisingly wholesome,” another wrote. “Like bringing a part of them back to life.”

Prep your skin like a pro for a flawless makeup application:

The post TikTok is obsessed with a woman who finds and re-creates recipes written on gravestones appeared first on In The Know.

More from In The Know:

You have to see these seriously flattering J.Crew swimsuits — they're all less than $20 this weekend!

Spotify's 'ghost artists': How fake musicians trick streaming algorithms

The 45 best tech deals you need to snag this weekend — as low as $12

TikTok food artists to follow for some culinary inspiration

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting