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UK will require new homes to have EV chargers starting in 2022

·1-min read

Electric vehicle (EV) charging stations will be required for all new homes and businesses in the UK starting in 2022, the government announced today. The new measure aims to boost EV adoption in the nation by adding up to 145,000 extra charging points each year.

"This will mean people can buy new properties already ready for an electric vehicle future, while ensuring charge points are readily available at new shops and workplaces across the UK — making it as easy as refueling a petrol or diesel car today," the press release states.

The UK government has already backed the installation of over 250,000 charging points, so the new rules would increase that by over 50 percent in the first year alone. Buildings like supermarkets and workplaces are included in the law, along with large scale renovations that will have over 10 parking spaces. However, details of the rules, like specifications and power outputs of the installations, have yet to be released.

Britain's opposition Labour party noted that London and the southeast part of the country have more charging points "than the rest of England and Wales combined," and the new law doesn't help in that regard. It also said that it doesn't include any provisions that would make EVs more affordable for lower- and middle-income families, the BBC reported.

The UK government aims to completely ban the sale of fossil fuel cars by 2030 — 10 years earlier than planned. The government previously said that it's prepared to spend £500 million (about $660 million) on building EV charging infrastructure in the country.

Editor's note: This article originally appeared on Engadget.

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