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UK weather: Remnants of two hurricanes sweeping the country this week - with weather warnings in place

Remnants of a second hurricane will sweep across the UK later this week - bringing further heavy showers and thunderstorms.

Hurricane Nigel formed in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean over the weekend and strengthened on Tuesday as it heads north towards Europe.

And while it is expected to weaken in the coming days, the storm is set to create more unsettled conditions and make its presence felt here.

Check the weather forecast where you are

Met Office spokesperson Grahame Madge said: "These systems have a long reach, it will increase rainfall rates and also winds to bring unsettled weather to the UK."

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Nigel's arrival will come days after Hurricane Lee - the tail end of which is currently lashing parts of Wales, the North West of England and parts of Scotland.

Yellow weather warnings for rain are in place - some until Wednesday evening - amid fears homes and businesses could flood in the hardest-hit areas.

Some western areas could see 100mm in rainfall - rising to 200mm in higher-altitude areas like Eryri National Park, also known as Snowdonia.

Forecasters say bus and train services could be delayed over the next 24 hours, but the rain will not compare with the "intense amounts" seen last weekend when more than 10,000 lightning strikes were recorded - with flash floods reported at a Butlin's holiday resort and Exeter Airport.

Mr Madge added: "Although we've indicated that there could be flooding associated with the reasonably high levels of rainfall, that's not something anticipated to be widespread.

"It's something that may be a consequence of a catchment that suddenly gets more inundated or there are blockages in drainage."

He went on to explain that Hurricane Lee has brought more moisture to the UK, along with higher air temperatures, resulting in greater levels of rainfall.