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Uniper to work with GE to decarbonise European gas plants

·1-min read
The logo of German energy utility company Uniper SE is pictured in the company's headquarters in Duesseldorf
The logo of German energy utility company Uniper SE is pictured in the company's headquarters in Duesseldorf

FRANKFURT (Reuters) - German utility Uniper <UN01.DE> will work out a plan to decarbonise its European gas-fired power plants by early 2021 in a cooperation with General Electric <GE.N>, it said on Tuesday.

"In a few years, Uniper's European fleet will consist mainly of climate-friendly gas-fired power plants and CO2-free hydropower," Uniper Chief Executive Andreas Schierenbeck said in a statement.

The agreement, which was signed last month, follows a cooperation deal with Siemens <SIEGn.DE> to look at using hydrogen at Uniper's gas-fired power plants and producing the carbon-free gas with power from its wind turbines.

Across Europe, Uniper, which is majority-owned by Finland's Fortum <FORTUM.HE>, operates gas-fired power plants of around 9 gigawatts, which is more than a quarter of its total generation capacity.

As part of its efforts to cut its emissions, Uniper aims to close three German hard coal-fired power plants, half its European coal-fired capacity, over the next five years.

(Reporting by Christoph Steitz)