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'Don't come to Canada. Fix your country': U.S. election drama brings out 'Emotional Support Canadians', but not everyone wants Americans to move

Ahmar Khan
·4-min read

Three days removed from election night in the United States, tensions remain high as a handful of states will determine the presidency. A few percentage points in Arizona, Pennsylvania, Georgia and Nevada separate Joe Biden and Donald Trump. In fact, the vote totals are too close for most news organizations to make calls, and as a result a lot of people on both sides of aisles and north of the border are feeling some angst.

Once the election results began coming out, some Canadians could sense their neighbours to the south needed support, and some Twitter users were offering their services as “emotional support Canadians.”

With the poll totals in some states moving at what feels like a snails pace, “emotional support” people are starting to offer creative and helpful solutions to bide the time.

While some Canadians are happy to take the load of Americans, many are not open to the idea of residents flooding the borders — especially if Trump is the reason they’re fleeing.

While the election result has been slow to come in and there’s been disinformation flying about from the Trump side, some Canadians cannot get their eyes off the chaos.

With absentee ballots being counted and a good chance results in Pennsylvania and potentially Arizona and Nevada won’t roll in until Friday, some Canadians are poking fun at the slow pace of the vote counting. To be fair, American ballots are far more complex, often with multiple choices and need to be verified with scrutineers from both parties on hand.