UK markets close in 5 hours 43 minutes
  • FTSE 100

    7,078.67
    +27.19 (+0.39%)
     
  • FTSE 250

    23,657.86
    +49.07 (+0.21%)
     
  • AIM

    1,268.45
    +1.47 (+0.12%)
     
  • GBP/EUR

    1.1706
    +0.0045 (+0.39%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.3695
    +0.0014 (+0.10%)
     
  • BTC-GBP

    31,814.90
    +418.54 (+1.33%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,088.15
    -14.91 (-1.35%)
     
  • S&P 500

    4,455.48
    +6.50 (+0.15%)
     
  • DOW

    34,798.00
    +33.20 (+0.10%)
     
  • CRUDE OIL

    74.93
    +0.95 (+1.28%)
     
  • GOLD FUTURES

    1,750.00
    -1.70 (-0.10%)
     
  • NIKKEI 225

    30,240.06
    -8.75 (-0.03%)
     
  • HANG SENG

    24,208.78
    +16.62 (+0.07%)
     
  • DAX

    15,670.20
    +138.45 (+0.89%)
     
  • CAC 40

    6,683.01
    +44.55 (+0.67%)
     

Vibrations could ruin the camera in your iPhone, Apple warns

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·2-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
The leaks revealed key features, including facial recognition (Getty)
The leaks revealed key features, including facial recognition (Getty)

Vibrations could damage the iPhone’s camera, Apple has warned its users.

The lenses themselves could stop working properly if they are exposed to the kind of vibrations that might, for example, come out of high-powered motorbike engines.

That is according to a new warning note posted on the company’s website and first spotted by Macrumors.

The warning relates specifically to some kinds of iPhones: those with optical image stabilisation or closed-loop autofocus, two technologies that are built into the phones to allow them to take better pictures.

Optical image stabilisation works by allowing the iPone to sense when it is moving, and move the lens with it, so that the effect of any movement will be limited and the image will not be blurry. Closed-loop autofocus, or AF, offsets the effects of gravity and vibrations to ensure that pictures are sharp.

The warning says that the systems “are designed for durability” but warns that they might be harmed by exposure to high vibrations for a long time.

“The OIS and closed-loop AF systems in iPhone are designed for durability,” the page reads. “However, as is the case with many consumer electronics that include systems like OIS, long-term direct exposure to high-amplitude vibrations within certain frequency ranges may degrade the performance of these systems and lead to reduced image quality for photos and videos.

“It is recommended to avoid exposing your iPhone to extended high-amplitude vibrations.”

iPhones might be subjected to such vibrations if they are, for example, mounted onto the handlebars of a motorbike engine – the vibrations are transmitted through the motobike and into the handlebars, which shakes the phone. The same could happen on mopeds or scooters, it says.

It advises that iPhones are not mounted to motorbikes with powerful engines, to protect them. On less powerful vehicles, iPhones can be attached but people should use a vibration-dampening mount so that the iPhone is protected, and that it should not be done regularly.

Read More

Huge meteor passing over Canada caught on doorbell camera

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting