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Farmer baffles social media with 'crazy' video of how onions are stored: 'Is this supposed to be a secret?'

Dillon Thompson
·2-min read

You can find a tiny, oddly specific corner of TikTok for just about anything.

There’s “scary TikTok,” reality-shifting TikTok and even court reporter TikTok. Now, thanks to Shay Meyers, there’s also onion farmer TikTok.

Meyers, a third-generation farmer based in Oregon, is currently going viral on the app for sharing behind-the-scenes videos about how our food is produced. In particular, one of his clips has commenters expressing their surprise over the “crazy” secrets behind farming in the U.S.

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That clip, which has more than 2.6 million views, features Meyers recording from inside some kind of gigantic, hangar-sized storage unit. This, he explains, is where onions are stored during the growing off-season.

“Why do we store onions?” he says in the clip. “Well, we live in North America guys, we’re not close to the equator. We have to store our fruits and vegetables, so we have them later.”

The farmer goes on to assure his followers that, just because they’re stored through the winter, onions are “not always a year old.” Still, many commenters seemed shocked to learn that the produce at their local grocery store might not always be as “fresh” as they assumed.

“Omg I have literally never thought about these logistics,” one user wrote.

“So you’re telling me they get stored for months at a time but my two onions go bad after a few days in the fridge,” another added.

“Isn’t this supposed to be a secret?” another asked.

Siting atop a huge mound of onions, Meyers elaborated further. If you were to buy an onion on the first of October, he explained, your onion would be coming “straight out of the field.” Between November and April, however, it’d probably come from a warehouse.

“Otherwise, everything would have to come from South America,” he added.

It’s unclear what percentage of onions in American stores come from the U.S., but it’s definitely a large amount. America is the world’s third-largest onion producer, behind only China and India, according to the World Atlas.

To some TikTok users, the info about their produce was irrelevant. They were just happy to have ended up on “onion TikTok.”

“I made it to Onion TikTok!” one user wrote.

“Commenting for more farm TikTok in my algorithm,” another added.

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The post Welcome to ‘onion farmer TikTok,’ a surprisingly popular corner of the internet appeared first on In The Know.