0KXI.L - Roku, Inc.

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
105.82
+71.08 (+204.61%)
At close: 5:17PM BST
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Previous close34.74
Open105.43
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range105.43 - 105.82
52-week range105.43 - 105.82
Volume126
Avg. volumeN/A
Market cap11.76B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.58
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.33
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
  • Roku updates its Roku Channel, pushing it further into competition with Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon
    Yahoo Finance

    Roku updates its Roku Channel, pushing it further into competition with Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon

    Roku is updating its The Roku Channel with more streaming options, putting it closer to competition with the likes of Netflix and Disney.

  • Why this analyst sees Netflix stock crashing more than 60%
    Yahoo Finance

    Why this analyst sees Netflix stock crashing more than 60%

    Netflix shares are overvalued at current levels, one Wall Street analyst argues.

  • Reuters

    HBO Max announces more launch partners; no deals yet with Amazon, Comcast, Roku

    HBO Max will be available on Altice USA Inc, Cox Communications, Microsoft Corp, National Cable Television Cooperative (NCTC), Samsung, Sony Interactive Entertainment and Verizon Communications Inc when it launches on May 27, the company said. The company had previously announced distribution deals with Apple Inc, Charter Communications Inc, Hulu and Alphabet Inc's Google and YouTube TV.

  • US recession will spark more cord-cutting and content streaming: Roku exec
    Yahoo Finance

    US recession will spark more cord-cutting and content streaming: Roku exec

    The streaming-content movement will only get stronger because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Roku CFO Steve Louden tells Yahoo Finance.

  • Roku sees ad sales growth slowing as businesses conserve cash
    Reuters

    Roku sees ad sales growth slowing as businesses conserve cash

    The ad crunch comes at a time when the video streaming device maker is trying to shift focus from device sales to advertising as more streaming services enter the market. Roku puts advertisements on its free Roku Channel and also charges a commission from media companies that stream programming on the free, ad-supported channel.

  • Roku Releases First Quarter 2020 Financial Results
    Business Wire

    Roku Releases First Quarter 2020 Financial Results

    Roku Releases First Quarter 2020 Financial Results

  • Roku Unveils OneView Ad Platform
    Business Wire

    Roku Unveils OneView Ad Platform

    Roku, Inc. (Nasdaq: ROKU) today unveiled OneView Ad Platform, a single platform leveraging TV identity data from the No. 1 TV streaming platform in the US to manage advertising — across OTT, desktop and mobile campaigns — that reaches an estimated four in five homes in the U.S.

  • April jobs report, earnings: What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance

    April jobs report, earnings: What to know in the week ahead

    It is gearing up to be another busy week for market participants with a slew of earnings announcements on the calendar and the highly-anticipated April’s jobs report.

  • Best Buy will let you back in some of its stores, by appointment only
    Yahoo Finance

    Best Buy will let you back in some of its stores, by appointment only

    Best Buy takes a novel approach to start reopening its physical stores.

  • Bethenny Frankel predicts coronavirus will level the Hollywood playing field
    Yahoo Finance

    Bethenny Frankel predicts coronavirus will level the Hollywood playing field

    The coronavirus pandemic is creating another shift away from scripted programming, according to former reality TV star Bethenny Frankel.

  • Roku Joins Global Citizen to Stream "One World: Together at Home" on The Roku Channel
    Business Wire

    Roku Joins Global Citizen to Stream "One World: Together at Home" on The Roku Channel

    Roku, Inc. (NASDAQ: ROKU) today announced it is partnering with Global Citizen to bring Roku® users One World: Together at Home, a global special that pays tribute to and celebrates frontline healthcare workers. The event, which airs on Saturday, April 18, at 5 p.m. PT/8 p.m. ET, will be available on The Roku Channel in the U.S., as well as on partner channels on the Roku platform. For Canadian users, BeIN SPORTS XTRA on The Roku Channel and Global TV will broadcast the event, additionally it will be on Crave beginning Sunday, April 19. In the U.K., Roku users can tune in through Insight TV or watch Highlights of One World: Together at Home on BBC iPlayer, including Elton John, Lizzo and Paul McCartney performing from their homes. Those in Brazil can enjoy on their Roku devices through Globoplay. The historic special includes leading global health experts, alongside performances by the world’s top artists and comedians.

  • Coronavirus Has Us Wondering Who’s in Charge Here
    Bloomberg

    Coronavirus Has Us Wondering Who’s in Charge Here

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- This is Bloomberg Opinion Today, an Articles of Confederation of Bloomberg Opinion’s opinions. Sign up here.Today’s AgendaTrump doesn’t have total authority over states, which are going their own way … for better or worse. Quarantine’s a mixed bag even for companies selling media or alcohol. Don’t kill the Postal Service.States’ Rights and WrongsSome day in, say, 2023, when California is an independent nation and New Yorkers are citizens of the Free Republic of Cuomostan, we might look back at this pandemic as the moment when the whole “United States” thing went kablooey.OK, probably not. But this is certainly a time to consider the tensile strength of the national fabric, with 50 different states mostly just doing their own thing on the pandemic. President Donald Trump insists he has “total” authority over all, despite contrary evidence and his own refusal to coordinate action so far. Oh, and the Constitution. Sure, predecessors such as FDR have taken the reins of national functions during crises, but only in concert with Congress, the judicial system and others to lay the groundwork and check that power, writes Jonathan Bernstein. That’s how the system was designed, because the founders had this weird thing about total authority being vested in one person.The kind of team-building skills and foresight needed to become the next FDR aren’t in this particular president’s toolkit, notes Ramesh Ponnuru. In fact, he hasn’t even managed to do replacement-level presidenting with the powers he does have: He doesn’t effectively run the bureaucracy, cut deals, push legislation or influence people. He’s got complaining on Twitter on lock, of course, but even Republicans generally ignore him.Meanwhile, absent strong federal leadership, states are giving new meaning to the phrase “laboratories of democracy,” writes Noah Smith. Governors are planning their own pandemic reopenings, some wisely and others not so much. Some, including California’s Gavin Newsom, New York’s Andrew Cuomo, Ohio’s Mike DeWine and Washington’s Jay Inslee, have handled the crisis better than Trump and their less-aggressive counterparts. Now they can test escape routes from this nightmare.A coordinated federal pandemic plan would be preferable, so coronavirus-skeptical governors don’t put their citizens and neighbors at risk, writes Max Nisen. In the meantime, we seem to be entering a new phase of federalism, one in which states increasingly go their own ways and butt heads, writes Tyler Cowen. It may not lead to the Free Republic of Cuomostan, but it could be a throwback to the pre-constitutional days of the Articles of Confederation.Further Economic-Reopening Reading:Basing reopening plans on virus data is dicey because the current tallies are so badly flawed. — Cathy O’Neil But we’ll have to reopen even without adequate data because people just won’t do this for 18 months. — Michael R. StrainThings Are Tough All Over: Corporate EditionYou’d think this would be a boom time for companies catering to a nation desperately craving distraction. But they’ve got problems, too. The media industry, for example, needs a steady flow of new content, which has dried up in the pandemic, along with amusement-park attendance and other lucrative business lines, writes Tara Lachapelle. Meanwhile, with unemployment possibly at 20%, people aren’t exactly rushing to pay for new streaming services, much less existing cable bills.Roku Inc., which makes little boxes that funnel content to people, relies on ad revenue that is being slashed in the crisis, writes Tae Kim.We may be drinking more at home to kill the time and the pain, but we’re drinking cheaper beer than when we go out with friends, notes Andrea Felsted. This is a problem for such brewers as Anheuser-Busch InBev.Even the roaring success of Netflix Inc. is not a great sign for the future, writes John Authers: It makes sense if we’re all going to be inside for months to come, but in that case maybe the stock market shouldn’t be quite so exuberant.And growing labor unrest at quarantine overlord Amazon.com Inc. is a hint the economic recovery could be profitless, as companies have to maintain a higher-paid staff but accept lower revenue, writes Conor Sen.Further Corporate Problem Reading: Companies aren’t being smart about layoffs. — Roy Bahat in conversation with Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfeeFree the Post OfficeThe U.S. Postal Service is something of a miracle. For just 55 cents, you can send a letter anywhere in the country in a reasonably short time, and mailing packages isn’t all that much more expensive. The service is critical for rural communities — especially now, when quarantined people need mail carriers to deliver prescription drugs and other necessities. Conservatives have spent decades tying its hands in Congress and trying to destroy it, and the pandemic may finally help them realize their dream. The service will go under in a matter of months without a government bailout Trump has refused to extend. There’s a better way, writes Tim O’Brien: Instead of killing the Postal Service, we should reinvent it and give it control of its own finances. It still has much more work to do.Telltale ChartsIt’s Zoom’s world now, writes Ben Schott. Skype and Google Hangouts just live in it.JPMorgan Chase & Co. recorded an eye-watering loan-loss provision in the latest quarter, but also showed signs it can withstand even a prolonged and deep downturn, writes Brian Chappatta.Further ReadingPutin had no choice but to join the OPEC+ deal; sticking to it won’t be easy or cost-free. — Clara Ferreira MarquesThere’s really no good reason for the Fed to buy junk-bond ETFs. — Brian ChappattaEurope needs more than just a shared pool of money; it needs shared health resources. — Lionel LaurentThis is the IMF’s chance to become the world’s lender of last resort. — Clive CrookThe IMF expects the worst global recession since the Depression; Bloomberg Opinion columnists are split on whether it’s too pessimistic or too optimistic. — Mohamed El-Erian, Bill Dudley, Narayana Kocherlakota, John Authers, Tim Duy, Conor Sen, Noah SmithICYMIHedge-fund managers are claiming small-business bailouts.Who knew? Americans are great at social distancing.Bad Bunny is the world’s biggest pop star.KickersDeclassified CIA documents apparently discuss Soviet paranormal experiments.For $100, you can have a goat bomb your next Zoom meeting. (h/t Scott Kominers for the first two kickers)William Gibson didn’t expect the Internet to turn out like this.At 20, “American Psycho” is timelier than ever.Note: Please send goats and complaints to Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.net.Sign up here and follow us on Twitter and Facebook.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mark Gongloff is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. He previously was a managing editor of Fortune.com, ran the Huffington Post's business and technology coverage, and was a columnist, reporter and editor for the Wall Street Journal.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Roku Isn’t the Coronavirus Play Netflix Is
    Bloomberg

    Roku Isn’t the Coronavirus Play Netflix Is

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- With Netflix Inc. soaring to new highs, it may be tempting to think video-streaming platform Roku Inc. might be the next big stay-at-home play amid heightened demand  for viewing options in a coronavirus world. But investors should be wary of any comparison between the two companies as they have drastically different business models. Simply, Roku is no Netflix.Late Monday, Roku updated its financial guidance for the quarter ended in March, projecting a slightly higher sales range of $307 million to $317 million, versus its prior forecast of about $305 million. The company said it saw increased viewing numbers late in the quarter due to more people sheltering at home. It also withdrew its full-year 2020 financial outlook,  citing the economic uncertainties stemming from the Covid-19 pandemic. Its shares surged more than 10% in midday trading Tuesday.At first blush, this seems like a positive development. Roku beat its revenue guidance and business trends recently accelerated as the public spent more time at home. But due to the nature of the company’s businesses, it isn’t as good as it looks for its future prospects.Roku sells video-streaming hardware devices, which enable consumers to watch content over the internet, and licenses its operating system to TV makers. The company’s long-term strategy is centered around its free on-demand, ad-supported content channels. Its Roku Channel offers thousands of free movies and TV shows, which the company uses to sell targeted advertising to marketers. Last year, Roku shares were one of the best performing stocks in the market, rising 337% on the back of  Wall Street enthusiasm over the company’s early success in ad-supported streaming TV market.Therein lies the problem. Unlike Netflix, which has a more stable revenue stream from its monthly subscription fees, Roku is reliant on corporations buying TV ads on its platform. To illustrate, RBC Capital Markets estimates ad-based revenue will account for about half the company’s overall sales this year. But in a difficult economy struggling with the aftereffects of Covid-19, companies in almost every consumer discretionary industry — from travel to auto and retail — are likely to slash their ad budgets this year, directly impacting Roku’s business.In fact, Roku said last night it expects some advertisers to pause or curtail spending in the near term. But perhaps a more striking tell of the company’s worries is its move to shore up its finances. Roku said it ended the first quarter with about $587 million in cash after it drew down $70 million in its credit lines.“We decided it was prudent to draw down our credit facility in light of current financial market conditions,” Roku’s chief financial office Steve Louden said in the release.In 2019, Roku lost about $60 million. It seems the company is battening down the hatches in case its losses get much worse.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tae Kim is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Barron's, following an earlier career as an equity analyst.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Roku Provides Estimated Q1 Results

    Roku Provides Estimated Q1 Results 2020 Outlook Withdrawn due to COVID-19 Uncertainty

  • Roku launches ad-funded streaming channel in 'stay-at-home' Britain
    Reuters

    Roku launches ad-funded streaming channel in 'stay-at-home' Britain

    Streaming-device maker Roku Inc launched its Roku Channel in Britain on Tuesday, offering free access to more than 10,000 movies, TV episodes and documentaries at a time when the coronavirus is driving demand for stay-at-home entertainment. The Roku Channel, which is available using a Roku streaming player, Roku TV or pay-TV company Sky's NOW TV device or Sky Q box, will show British series including "Homes Under the Hammer", "Ultimate Force" and "Skins" and Hollywood hits like "Get Carter", the company said. Rob Holmes, vice president of programming, said there was an opportunity to supplement subscription video-on-demand services like Netflix and Disney+ with a free offer.

  • Roku Launches The Roku Channel in the UK
    Business Wire

    Roku Launches The Roku Channel in the UK

    Roku, Inc. today announced the arrival of "The Roku Channel" in the UK, a streaming channel providing consumers with free access to 10.000+ movies, TV episodes and documentaries. There are no subscriptions, fees or logins required to access The Roku Channel. The Roku Channel is available starting today to consumers with a Roku® streaming player, Roku TV, NOW TV device or Sky Q box.

  • Roku OS 9.3 Delivers New Ways to Get to Entertainment Quickly
    Business Wire

    Roku OS 9.3 Delivers New Ways to Get to Entertainment Quickly

    Roku, Inc. (NASDAQ: ROKU) today announced Roku® OS 9.3 will start rolling out to Roku devices in the coming weeks. The free, automatic software update focuses on helping consumers get to content quickly via Roku Voice™ enhancements, improving overall performance, new customization options and more.

  • Instagram to Roll Out IGTV Advertising in Challenge to YouTube
    Bloomberg

    Instagram to Roll Out IGTV Advertising in Challenge to YouTube

    (Bloomberg) -- Instagram plans to sell advertisements in IGTV, its home for longer videos, a bid to compete with YouTube for a larger share of the booming market for online video.Instagram started reaching out to its top video creators on Friday, asking them to partner on ad tests. Those in the program will receive a 55% share of all advertising in IGTV, the same rate as YouTube, according to people familiar with the matter. The company will start testing the ads this spring.“This is another step forward to help creators monetize with IGTV,” Justin Osofsky, chief operating officer of Instagram, said in a statement. “To be sure we get this right, we are talking to a few emerging creators to help us test this and plan to expand slowly.”A lack of revenue sharing was one of the main reasons top digital stars stayed away from the IGTV format, which is separate from the main Instagram feed. Within the main app, ads that look like regular posts already generate about $20 billion annually in revenue, accounting for more than a quarter of sales at owner Facebook Inc., people familiar with the matter have said.Facebook is relying on Instagram to fuel its next wave of growth, especially as its main social network faces a slowdown. Facebook, based in Menlo Park, California, doesn’t break out numbers for Instagram.Instagram currently has ads in its main feed of updates, as well as in its stories feature -- the one featuring posts that disappear after 24 hours.YouTube, the world’s largest online video site, generated $15 billion in advertising sales last year. The total online video advertising market also includes Roku Inc., Walt Disney Co.’s Hulu and Amazon.com Inc.Video has been a hard nut to crack so far. IGTV has struggled to attract users since its debut in June 2018, in large part because many of Instagram’s most popular profiles have yet to post longer videos alongside their photos and brief stories. Unlike YouTube, Instagram doesn’t share advertising sales with creators. But that’s about the change.To contact the reporters on this story: Lucas Shaw in Los Angeles at lshaw31@bloomberg.net;Sarah Frier in San Francisco at sfrier1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Former Best Buy CEO: Companies should 'pursue a noble purpose and good things'
    Yahoo Finance

    Former Best Buy CEO: Companies should 'pursue a noble purpose and good things'

    Yahoo Finance chats about the future of capitalism with Best Buy executive chairman Hubert Joly.

  • Bloomberg

    Roku Says It Doesn’t Plan to Create Original Shows at This Time

    (Bloomberg) -- Roku Inc. said it has no plans to create its own shows after a report from Digiday that the company was “in talks” for original programming.“We aren’t creating any original shows and don’t have any plans to do so at this time,” spokesperson Diane Carlini said in an email on Wednesday, echoing comments made to Digiday. Original programming would set the company on a path to compete with services like Netflix Inc. and Walt Disney Co.’s Disney+, as opposed to acting as a neutral video-streaming platform.Roku also stood by comments made after its recent earnings report about the coronavirus. “We said we have experienced minimal impact so far, and that remains the case today,” Carlini wrote.The shares slipped 0.3% at 3:06 p.m. in New York. They have dropped more than 20% from a February peak.To contact the reporter on this story: Ryan Vlastelica in New York at rvlastelica1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Roku Turns Lower as Outlook Overshadows Active Account Beat
    Bloomberg

    Roku Turns Lower as Outlook Overshadows Active Account Beat

    (Bloomberg) -- Roku Inc. shares fell on Friday, erasing an initial rally that came in the wake of its better-than-expected fourth-quarter results.Analysts were broadly positive on the quarter, the latest to show strong momentum at the video-streaming platform as consumers cut the cord on traditional cable services and move toward services like Netflix or Disney+However, the adjusted loss per share beat expectations by a smaller degree than is typical for the company. In addition, some firms expressed concern over the stock’s valuation following a recent surge, and said the Ebitda guidance looked light.Shares fell 7.8% after earlier spiking as much as 8.7%. The stock remains down more than 20% from a record close, though it has risen more than 30% off a September low, and it remains up more than 300% from the start of 2019.Here’s what analysts are saying about the results:Macquarie Research, Tim NollenThe outlook “is a bit below our admittedly bullish estimates,” given more investment costs and “a more measured international roll-out” than expected.Expects a full-year loss of $1.33 a share, compared with a prior view of a loss of 38 cents a share.Outperform, $170 price target.Loop Capital Markets, Alan Gould“While the company has executed well, it still faces substantial potential competition.” It is “difficult to justify the $18 billion enterprise value.”Sell, $80 price target.SunTrust Robinson Humphrey, Matthew ThorntonActive account additions “were well ahead of consensus,” which is likely due in part to Disney+. However, the Ebitda outlook “is well below consensus,” and competing platforms could pressure Roku’s margins.“Roku continues to execute and is well-placed in the secular shift to internet TV.”Hold, $160 price target.Rosenblatt Securities, Mark ZgutowiczThis was a “generally stellar quarter,” and the outlook underscores Roku’s “widening scale and market leverage.”Sees signs of “meaningful” international growth ahead.Buy, price target raised to $190 from $159.RBC Capital Markets, Mark MahaneyThe company’s platform business “looks like a sustainable 50% grower.” Fundamentals were “solid” in the quarter, with only a “very modest” deceleration in growth from “robust levels.”Outperform, price target $170 from $160.Stephens, Kyle EvansThe outlook was “in line or above consensus where it mattered most -- revenue and gross margin in its Platform segment.”A “heavy” launch cycle for streaming video on demand services in 2020 and 2021 “is likely to drive [average revenue per user] higher for the foreseeable future.”“Investors wanting exposure to connected T.V. will continue to bid Roku upward.”Overweight, $155 price target.Susquehanna Financial Group, Shyam PatilThe report and outlook “continue to highlight Roku’s strong momentum.” Active accounts rose more than expected, and “engagement growth was also strong.”Positive, price target raised to $170 from $150.Guggenheim, Michael Morris“Roku holds an attractive position within an expanding global steaming market and ultimately has the potential for a higher valuation.”Buy, $150 price target.What Bloomberg Intelligence Says:Roku is “still well-positioned to benefit from the secular shift away from traditional pay-TV, as the company reinforced its position as the No. 1 TV streaming platform in the U.S.”\- Analyst Amine Bensaid\- Click here for the research(Updates with afternoon trading, adds Macquarie comments)To contact the reporter on this story: Ryan Vlastelica in New York at rvlastelica1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Scott Schnipper, Steven FrommFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Roku Gains After Surge in Active Accounts Fuels Revenue Beat

    (Bloomberg) -- Roku Inc. reported a surge in new active accounts in its fourth-quarter results, with the video-streaming platform benefiting from the debut of new services like Disney+. The account additions beat expectations and the shares gained as much as 13% in extended trading.Active accounts rose by 4.6 million to 36.9 million in the quarter, compared with the average estimate of 35.9 million, according to Bloomberg Consensus estimates. Roku also reported a loss of 13 cents a share on revenue of $411.2 million. Wall Street had been looking for a loss of 14 cents a share and revenue of $391.7 million.“Disney has had a lot of positive press out in the market and we’ve been a very good source of viewership for Disney+ and they’ve been a good partner,” Chief Financial Officer Steve Louden said in an interview.For the first quarter, Roku forecast sales of $300 million to $310 million and a loss of $18 million to $23 million before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. Wall Street was looking for sales of $296.8 million and Ebitda of $4.2 million.Thursday’s after-hours move comes after a pronounced gain that has seen shares jump almost 180% over the past year. The company is one of the most visible plays on the so-called over-the-top video sector, which has grown increasingly popular as consumers cut the cord on traditional cable packages and gravitate instead toward on-demand streaming. Walt Disney’s service, launched in November, was seen as accelerating this trend.Roku’s position within this market has made it a favorite among analysts. According to data compiled by Bloomberg, 13 firms recommend buying the stock, while two have hold-equivalent ratings and three advocate selling.Roku’s streaming platform has had a “great” reception in Brazil after debuting there last month, Louden said. The Los Gatos, California-based company has a “huge opportunity” in international markets, where the move to streaming is still in “early days,” he said.(Adds CFO comment in third and last paragraphs.)To contact the reporters on this story: Ryan Vlastelica in New York at rvlastelica1@bloomberg.net;Jeran Wittenstein in San Francisco at jwittenstei1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Greg ChangFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • New streaming launches power Roku's holiday sales, forecast
    Reuters

    New streaming launches power Roku's holiday sales, forecast

    Roku expects full-year revenue between $1.58 billion and $1.62 billion, while analysts were expecting $1.58 billion, according to IBES data from Refinitiv. Walt Disney Co's streaming platform Disney+ launched https://www.reuters.com/article/us-walt-disney-streaming/disney-streaming-exceeds-expectations-with-10-million-sign-ups-shares-surge-idUSKBN1XN2AK in November and reached 10 million sign-ups in its first day, while Apple Inc also introduced its streaming service Apple TV+ in the same month.

  • Inflation data, earnings: What to know in markets Thursday
    Yahoo Finance

    Inflation data, earnings: What to know in markets Thursday

    Inflation data and a slew of earnings announcements will be in focus Thursday.

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