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Xiaomi Corporation (1810.HK)

HKSE - HKSE Delayed price. Currency in HKD
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25.850+0.500 (+1.97%)
At close: 4:08PM HKT
Full screen
Previous close25.350
Open25.400
Bid25.800 x 0
Ask25.850 x 0
Day's range25.050 - 26.350
52-week range11.540 - 35.900
Volume142,681,405
Avg. volume212,310,984
Market cap646.576B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.40
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings date24 Mar 2021
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est17.65
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  • Biden redraws battle lines in the tech war with China
    The Telegraph

    Biden redraws battle lines in the tech war with China

    As the elevator ascended the headquarters of the African Union in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, James Lewis’s guides offered word of advice. “You know, the Chinese built this building,” the former US diplomat remembers them saying, “so when you speak, speak clearly into the wall”. It was December 2019, about two years after the explosive allegation that Chinese spies had snooped on the Union’s business through its Huawei-made communications network. But in June, the body had approved Huawei for an expanded contract, and now everyone in the lift was laughing about it. Their joke illustrates a challenge that lies ahead for US President Joe Biden as he picks up Donald Trump’s tech war. On Wednesday the Pentagon agreed to remove the Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi from its blacklist, the latest in a series of retreats by US officials – raising questions over how far Biden will follow his predecessor’s bellicose approach. "There was always a powerful tension in the Trump administration between people who wanted to basically embargo trade with China and people who were a little more reasonable," says Lewis at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC who previously ran backchannel cybersecurity talks with Chinese academics. "That led them into a number of erratic decisions... and one thing Biden's people have told me is that they’re going to be more reasonable, they’re going to take a step back, they’re going to be more balanced." The first ban to unravel was against WeChat, a "super-app" owned by Shenzhen-based tech giant Tencent. WeChat is ubiquitous in China and critical for many of America's 2.5m Chinese immigrants (as well as US-born Chinese Americans) to keep in touch with relatives.