7201.T - Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.

Tokyo - Tokyo Delayed price. Currency in JPY
414.30
+20.30 (+5.15%)
At close: 3:15PM JST
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Previous close394.00
Open399.00
Bid413.80 x 0
Ask414.40 x 0
Day's range397.00 - 416.00
52-week range311.20 - 784.30
Volume23,037,900
Avg. volume22,868,154
Market cap1.621T
Beta (5Y monthly)1.25
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-171.54
Earnings date27 Jul 2020 - 31 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yield38.50 (9.77%)
Ex-dividend date27 Sep 2019
1y target est1,065.60
  • Nissan's China sales grew 4.5% in June
    Reuters

    Nissan's China sales grew 4.5% in June

    Japanese automaker Nissan Motor <7201.T> said on Friday its sales in China grew 4.5% in June from a year earlier to 136,929 vehicles, as the world's biggest auto market recovered from its coronavirus low. China's auto market, the world's biggest, is one of Nissan's focuses as the embattled carmaker struggles to fix problems from ousted leader Carlos Ghosn's aggressive expansion drive.

  • Japan asks U.S. to extradite men accused of helping ex-Nissan boss Ghosn flee
    Reuters

    Japan asks U.S. to extradite men accused of helping ex-Nissan boss Ghosn flee

    Japan has formally asked the United States to extradite a former Green Beret and his son accused of helping former Nissan Motor Co boss Carlos Ghosn flee the country while he was awaiting trial on financial charges. Japan submitted a request to the U.S. State Department to extradite Michael Taylor and his son, Peter Taylor, after they were provisionally arrested in Massachusetts in May, the U.S. Justice Department said in a court filing on Thursday.

  • U.S. Auto Sales Fail to Recover in Q2: More Pain Ahead?
    Zacks

    U.S. Auto Sales Fail to Recover in Q2: More Pain Ahead?

    Moody's forecasts global auto sales decline of at least 20% year over year in 2020, with major impacts to be felt in North America and EMEA.

  • Nissan to Launch Seven Models in Africa, Create 1200 Jobs
    Zacks

    Nissan to Launch Seven Models in Africa, Create 1200 Jobs

    Nissan (NSANY) will expand its SUV and cross-over portfolio in Africa with seven new models, of which four will be in the SUV category.

  • Slumping fleet sales weigh on U.S. auto market
    Reuters

    Slumping fleet sales weigh on U.S. auto market

    Weak fleet orders are expected to hurt June sales, which automakers will report on Wednesday. Cox Automotive forecasts fleet sales will fall nearly 56% to 1.3 million vehicles after plunging 83% in May and 77% in April. In the short term, fleet sales are not a major concern for automakers focused on ramping up production to beef up anemic dealer inventories for higher-profit sales to consumers.

  • Nissan to launch 7 models in Africa to pursue growth
    Reuters

    Nissan to launch 7 models in Africa to pursue growth

    Nissan Motor Co aims to launch seven new models in Africa over the next two years, company executives said on Monday, as the Japanese automaker seeks to focus on high-growth markets to try to weather the impact of the COVID-19 crisis. Nissan will expand its SUV and cross-over portfolio in Africa with seven new models, of which four will be in the SUV (sports utility vehicle) category, Shinkichi Izumi, managing director at Nissan South Africa, said. It plans to make Africa a hub for light commercial vehicles (LCV), will increase production of its popular Navara pick-ups and open plants in Ghana and Kenya, Izumi said.

  • Nissan to launch seven models in Africa to pursue growth
    Reuters

    Nissan to launch seven models in Africa to pursue growth

    Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> aims to launch seven new models in Africa over the next two years, company executives said on Monday, as the Japanese automaker seeks to focus on high-growth markets to try to weather the impact of the COVID-19 crisis. Nissan will expand its SUV and cross-over portfolio in Africa with seven new models, of which four will be in the SUV (sports utility vehicle) category, Shinkichi Izumi, managing director at Nissan South Africa, said. It plans to make Africa a hub for light commercial vehicles (LCV), will increase production of its popular Navara pick-ups and open plants in Ghana and Kenya, Izumi said.

  • Nissan denies corporate conspiracy to oust ex-chairman Ghosn
    Reuters

    Nissan denies corporate conspiracy to oust ex-chairman Ghosn

    Nissan Motor Co Ltd <7201.T> on Monday blasted suggestions in media reports of a conspiracy within the company to oust former chairman Carlos Ghosn. Ghosn's 2018 arrest in Japan on financial misconduct charges has led to much speculation that the move was orchestrated by Nissan executives who opposed closer ties with partner Renault SA <RENA.PA>. "I know that in books and the media there has been talk about a conspiracy but there are no facts whatsoever to support this," Motoo Nagai, chairman of Nissan's auditing committee, told shareholders at the company's annual general meeting.

  • 2020 J.D. Power Quality Scorecard Out: Who Wins, Who Loses?
    Zacks

    2020 J.D. Power Quality Scorecard Out: Who Wins, Who Loses?

    While Dodge and Kia hold the top positions in the influential 2020 J.D. Power Quality Survey, Tesla takes the last spot.

  • Nissan to lay off 200 Mexico workers amid global auto slowdown
    Reuters

    Nissan to lay off 200 Mexico workers amid global auto slowdown

    Japanese automaker Nissan will lay off about 200 workers at a plant in Mexico amid local and global challenges facing the automotive industry, the carmaker said on Thursday. "Stemming from changes in the global and local industry, we have had to make important decisions to ensure the sustainability of our operations in today's environment," a Nissan spokesperson told Reuters in a statement. The job cuts will take place at a Nissan plant in the central state of Aguascalientes, the firm said.

  • Japan car sales recovering after big fall in April, May - Nissan executive
    Reuters

    Japan car sales recovering after big fall in April, May - Nissan executive

    Nissan Motor Co on Wednesday said that car sales in Japan were recovering after a drop in demand in April and May due to the impact of the coronavirus. "If you look at the market, in April and May there was a big decline in demand, but this is recovering sharply," Executive Vice President Asako Hoshino said during a livestreamed event to launch the e-Power version of the automaker's Kicks SUV crossover model for the Japan market.

  • Reuters

    U.S. fights bail bid by men accused of helping former Nissan boss escape

    A U.S. prosecutor on Monday urged a judge to keep a former Green Beret and his son locked up as Japan prepares to formally seek their extradition on charges that they helped former Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> boss Carlos Ghosn flee the East Asian country. Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Hassink argued during a virtual hearing that Michael Taylor and his son, Peter Taylor, have a "clear and present reason to flee" after being accused of helping Ghosn, who faces financial misconduct charges in Japan.

  • Auto Stock Roundup: VWAGY-QuantumScape Deal, TSLA-Panasonic Pact & More
    Zacks

    Auto Stock Roundup: VWAGY-QuantumScape Deal, TSLA-Panasonic Pact & More

    While Volkswagen (VWAGY) pumps $200 million in QuantumScape to enhance the development of solid-state battery technology, Tesla (TSLA) inks a new battery supply deal with Panasonic.

  • Nissan cuts more shifts at Japan car plants due to low demand
    Reuters

    Nissan cuts more shifts at Japan car plants due to low demand

    Nissan Motor Co on Friday said it will cut more shifts at its three assembly plants in Japan due to falling demand, as the automaker struggles to recover from a drop in sales triggered by the coronavirus pandemic. In a statement on its website, Nissan sad it will cancel all night shifts at one of its production sites in Kyushu, southern Japan, from June 29 to July 31. Night shifts at its other Kyushu site will be stopped from July 20 to July 31, it added.

  • Exclusive: Who's in charge at Nissan? COO's allies push to give him shared CEO role – sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Who's in charge at Nissan? COO's allies push to give him shared CEO role – sources

    Thus far, Nissan Motor Co's 12-member board has no plan to change the roles of Chief Executive Makoto Uchida or his No. 2 Gupta, the sources told Reuters. The sources, all of whom have ties to Nissan's leadership team, declined to be identified because they aren't authorised to speak to reporters and because of the sensitivity of the topic. Nissan responded in a statement to Reuters there are "no plans or consideration for any change in the management structure at Nissan, and no change to the close collaborative working relationship between Mr. Uchida and Mr. Gupta in their current roles."

  • U.S. calls bid by men to avoid extradition over ex-Nissan boss Ghosn's escape 'flawed'
    Reuters

    U.S. calls bid by men to avoid extradition over ex-Nissan boss Ghosn's escape 'flawed'

    U.S. prosecutors on Tuesday said a former Green Beret and his son, wanted by Japan for helping former Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> boss Carlos Ghosn flee the country, were advancing a "flawed" interpretation of Japanese law to fight their extradition. Michael Taylor and his son, Peter Taylor, were arrested in Massachusetts last month at Japan's request for allegedly smuggling Ghosn out of the country on Dec. 29, 2019, in a box while he was out on bail awaiting trial on financial charges. Ghosn fled to Lebanon, his childhood home, after being charged with engaging in financial wrongdoing, including by understating his compensation in Nissan's financial statements.

  • Nissan's (NSANY) Rogue SUV to Finally Hit the Roads This Fall
    Zacks

    Nissan's (NSANY) Rogue SUV to Finally Hit the Roads This Fall

    Scheduled to go on sale this fall, Nissan's (NSANY) 2021 Rogue will be offered in three grades (S, SV and SL).

  • Nissan Scraps Plan to Offer Yen-Denominated Bonds in June
    Bloomberg

    Nissan Scraps Plan to Offer Yen-Denominated Bonds in June

    (Bloomberg) -- Nissan Motor Co. has scrapped a plan to offer yen-denominated bonds in June, in what would have been a return to the credit market after delaying a debt sale last year, according to people familiar with the matter.The Japanese automaker had been targeting an issuance size of 200 billion to 300 billion yen ($1.9 billion to $2.8 billion), people with knowledge of the matter said earlier this month.“We are considering various fundraising methods,” said Azusa Momose, a spokeswoman for Yokohama-based Nissan. “We can’t comment on any detailed plans for future fundraising.”Covid-19 has piled extra pressure on Nissan, which was already under strain following the 2018 arrest of former Chairman Carlos Ghosn, who had pushed for volume growth. The automaker posted its biggest lost in 20 years for the year ended March and unveiled a turnaround plan last month to weather a collapse in car demand due to the coronavirus pandemic.The company postponed a sale of 250 billion yen in corporate notes last September after a compensation scandal led to the ouster of then Chief Executive Officer Hiroto Saikawa, people familiar with the matter said at the time.Debt ScoreNissan’s credit ratings are at risk of being cut to non-investment grade. Moody’s Investors Service rates the automaker Baa3, one step above junk level, and it’s been placed on review for further downgrade.The carmaker’s fundamental credit metrics including profit margins and leverage remain weak, and with its recent earnings, it has “little cushion under its rating,” Mariko Semetko, vice president and senior credit officer at Moody’s, said earlier this month.(Updates with credit ratings in last two paragraphs)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nearly 250 jobs to go at Nissan's UK plant
    Reuters

    Nearly 250 jobs to go at Nissan's UK plant

    Nissan will not extend the contracts of 248 temporary workers at its British car factory, the Japanese automaker said on Thursday, as the industry struggles with reduced demand amid the coroanvirus outbreak. Output at the northern English Sunderland plant was halted in mid-March and resumed at the start of the week but with only one line, which makes the Juke and Qashqai models, in operation. A second line, which builds Qashqai and the electric LEAF, will reopen on June 22, the firm said.

  • Renault's Senard says relations with Nissan much improved
    Reuters

    Renault's Senard says relations with Nissan much improved

    Renault <RENA.PA>'s partnership with Japan's Nissan <7201.T> has entered an "incredibly positive" phase after episodes of strained relations in recent years, the French carmaker's chairman Jean-Dominique Senard said on Thursday. "We've put the work in, we're in an incredibly positive dynamic," Senard told a hearing in France's lower house of parliament, after Renault and Nissan presented plans to deepen their collaboration in May. Senard added that Renault was confident that car sales, which have ground to a halt during the coronavirus pandemic and ensuing lockdowns, would pick up again in France in the coming months.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Volkswagen, Toyota, Nissan and Honda
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Volkswagen, Toyota, Nissan and Honda

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Volkswagen, Toyota, Nissan and Honda

  • Japan Auto Sales in Free Fall: No Quick Recovery in Sight
    Zacks

    Japan Auto Sales in Free Fall: No Quick Recovery in Sight

    Outlook for new vehicle sales in Japan appears gloomy amid weak consumer sentiment and slowdown in economy.

  • Men accused of helping ex-Nissan boss flee Japan challenge U.S. extradition case
    Reuters

    Men accused of helping ex-Nissan boss flee Japan challenge U.S. extradition case

    Lawyers for the former Green Beret and son wanted by Japan for helping former Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> boss Carlos Ghosn flee the country on Monday argued U.S. authorities wrongly arrested them for aiding a crime that they say does not exist in Japan: bail jumping. Lawyers for Michael Taylor and his son, Peter Taylor, in a motion asked a federal judge in Boston to quash the U.S. warrants issued last month for their arrests or release them on bail while their extradition case proceeds. U.S. authorities arrested the Taylors in May at Japan's request for allegedly smuggling Ghosn out of the country in a box while he was out on bail awaiting trial on financial charges.

  • Bloomberg

    How Covid-19 Has Made Brexit Even Harder

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It came as no surprise that a fourth round of trade negotiations between the U.K. and the EU has produced no big breakthrough. Once again, there is talk about Britain separating from the EU in December without a trade deal in place; Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey told banks this week to prepare for just that.Why hasn’t the coronavirus pandemic changed the Brexit narrative, forced an outbreak of reasonableness between U.K. and EU negotiators or at least made compromise more likely? It’s a fair question. The Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish administrations have all said they would like Prime Minister Boris Johnson to extend the current one-year transition period through 2021 or 2022, which he can legally do if he makes the request to the EU by the end of this month. On Wednesday, the Scottish government said that without an extension, Scottish gross domestic product could be up to 1.1% lower after two years, costing 3 billion pounds ($3.8 billion) of lost activity.Polls have suggested the U.K. public would favor an extension. Given the enormous costs of dealing with the pandemic — which in Britain’s case involves one of the world’s most generous furlough schemes — you would think the U.K. would seek to avoid the increased costs and uncertainty of forgoing a trade deal and moving to World Trade Organization terms.Perhaps the U.K. will come around eventually; these negotiations never really reveal themselves until the eleventh hour. Germany’s ambassador to Brussels suggested as much this week. But, crucially, he noted that a breakthrough will require the U.K. to accept some loss of sovereignty.  The idea that the pandemic might moderate U.K.-EU trade talks was more plausible a couple of months ago. If the virus produced an economic crisis in Europe, or undermined the unity of the 27 member states in the negotiations, then that might have changed the balance of forces. But Europe seems to have weathered both the health care crisis and the economic consequences far better than many predicted. And so far the bloc seems determined to hold the line, even if it means no deal is possible by the end of the year.There are also several reasons why Johnson and U.K. negotiators are unwilling to compromise. One is political: Johnson owes his job and his popularity (even if it has been dented by his virus response) to Brexit. That, ironically, may limit his room for maneuver now. The U.K. officially left the EU on Jan. 31, but Brexiters are still highly suspicious of any delays to Britain leaving the EU’s single market and striking its own trade deals, which Johnson promised would happen at the end of this year. An extension would require the U.K. to continue paying funds into the EU budget, something that is not likely to go down well with either Parliament or public.And that’s before considering the other compromises required. There is no deal Britain can strike that doesn’t involve giving up some control, in order to accept some EU rules and regulations and retain access to its single market, as political risk consultant Mujtaba Rahman has argued. Britain could give ground on EU demands for continued access to U.K. fishing waters — the U.K. fishing industry is symbolically important but tiny, and sells 80% of its catch to the EU market. But Brussels’ insistence that the U.K. commit to following EU rules on workers’ rights, social and environmental rules and other so-called level-playing field commitments is seen by Brexiters as undermining the whole point of leaving the EU.There is no doubt that leaving the EU’s single market at the end of this year will bring costs. But camouflaged by the pandemic’s effects, and mitigated by the huge upswing of debt-fueled government spending, Brexiters may argue there is no better time to bite the bullet. The coronavirus pandemic is forecast to hit GDP over 13% this year, while the economic impact of Brexit has been estimated to result in foregone growth of 8% of GDP over a 15-year period.The range of issues on which the U.K. and the EU are negotiating also go far beyond fisheries, financial services and level-playing field provisions. There are disagreements over, among other things, the recognition of professional qualifications, procurement rules, the sharing of data and information for security purposes and the implementation of the Irish Protocol, the key part of the divorce deal that preserved an open border between Northern Ireland and EU-member Ireland. There is no way this range of trade issues can be resolved, with even the best of intentions and no pandemic crisis, in the limited time available. The U.K. and the EU will be working through their new normal for years to come, whether or not they strike a deal at the end of this one.Several realities might compel Johnson to strike a limited deal and dress it up as a victory. With unemployment rising, and companies taking on debt and furloughing workers, the pressure on Johnson to prevent manufacturers like Nissan, Britain’s largest carmaker, from shutting down will only intensify. Many of these companies are in precisely the parts of the country whose blue-collar, former Labour-supporting voters handed Johnson the December election.The idea that both Brexit and the pandemic would provide Britain with the opportunity to reshore some production, as well as shift supply chains away from the EU, sounds fine, but it won’t be straightforward. Reshoring will take significant investment and time. For companies whose balance sheets have been loaded with debt, that investment may be difficult. Given U.K. labor costs and environmental and social regulations, reshoring will also mean higher costs up the value chain. Energy costs, the availability of skilled labor, planning restrictions and other barriers will also slow things down.The possibility of a rupture in U.K.-EU trade negotiations — leading to customs barriers and other uncertainties for which Britain is not well prepared — might concentrate minds toward the end of this year. But so far, the pandemic hasn’t made getting a Brexit deal any easier.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Therese Raphael is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion. She was editorial page editor of the Wall Street Journal Europe.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nissan warns UK plant 'unsustainable' without EU trade deal - BBC
    Reuters

    Nissan warns UK plant 'unsustainable' without EU trade deal - BBC

    Nissan's car manufacturing plant in Sunderland, northern England, which employs 7,000, is "unsustainable" if Britain leaves the European Union without a trade deal, it said on Wednesday. Ashwani Gupta, the Japanese company's global chief operating head, told the BBC its commitment to the car plant, the United Kingdom's largest, could not be maintained if there was no tariff-free access to the bloc. The EU is the biggest market for the factory, which made just under 350,000 vehicles last year and builds the Qashqai, Juke and Leaf models.

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