8GC.F - Glencore Plc

Frankfurt - Frankfurt Delayed price. Currency in EUR
1.7600
+0.0082 (+0.47%)
At close: 7:12PM CEST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close1.7518
Open1.7900
Bid1.7514 x 2000000
Ask1.7632 x 2000000
Day's range1.7198 - 1.7966
52-week range1.1930 - 3.1650
Volume71,455
Avg. volume131,265
Market cap23.54B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.74
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.18 (13.37%)
Ex-dividend date03 Sep 2020
1y target estN/A
  • Exclusive: Russia's Rosneft finds extended oil cuts painful - sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Russia's Rosneft finds extended oil cuts painful - sources

    Rosneft does not have enough crude to ship to buyers with which it has long-term supply deals, making it hard for the Russian company to continue with record oil cuts beyond June, four sources familiar with the matter told Reuters on Thursday. Rosneft has told the energy ministry it would be difficult to maintain cuts to the end of the year, as it has had to cut shipments to major buyers, such as Glencore and Trafigura, despite good demand, two sources close to the talks said on condition of anonymity. Glencore and Trafigura declined to comment.

  • Glencore chairman Hayward defends climate policy
    Reuters

    Glencore chairman Hayward defends climate policy

    Glencore on Thursday defended its climate policy from activists who want targets set for the use of its products, with Chairman Tony Hayward saying the miner's current plan will cut greenhouse gas emissions. Pressure on miners has mounted after Norway's $1 trillion wealth fund this month said it would sell its Glencore shares because it produces coal. In a call ahead of an annual general meeting on June 2, activist charity ShareAction said Glencore should align its policy with the Paris climate goals by setting targets for Scope 3 emissions, which are generated when its products are used.

  • Glencore Investors Prodded to Oust Firm’s Chairman
    Bloomberg

    Glencore Investors Prodded to Oust Firm’s Chairman

    (Bloomberg) -- Glencore Plc shareholders are being told to unseat Chairman Tony Hayward by an advisory firm critical of his environmental track record and independence after more than nine years on the board.The U.K.’s Pensions & Investment Research Consultants urged investors to vote against Hayward’s reappointment ahead of Glencore’s annual meeting on June 2. It criticized BP Plc’s former CEO for his handling of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and said he’s not independent enough given his extended time on the boardThe oil spill “scandal has raised significant concerns over his track record,” PIRC saysHayward was expected to leave Glencore at the end of his nine-year term, in line with a U.K. governance code, but the company has urged shareholders to extend his directorship as the group deals with corruption investigations and undergoes a broader leadership transitionESG Must-ReadsEnvironmentalThe EU’s economic recovery plan is set to include the world’s most climate-ambitious stimulus packageThe U.K. is proposing that the United Nations climate conference scheduled for Glasgow in November this year is delayed by 12 monthsBritain could create 850,000 new green energy jobs this decade if it uses recovery stimulus to fast-track decarbonization, a report has foundEurope is betting on emissions-free electricity for big industry in its economic recovery package, drafting measures to scale up the production of hydrogenGermany’s multi-billion euro bailout of Deutsche Lufthansa may cost the airline some precious airport slots, but one thing it won’t have to do is meet any new environmental rulesThe German government was sued by environmental activists over its failure to tackle harmful air pollutantsDaimler and Rolls-Royce are planning a fuel-cell systems cooperation, Handelsblatt reportedAfter the hottest winter on record in Russia, spring has brought a heatwave to SiberiaEskom Holdings’s desire to avoid spending $2.4b to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions at one of its largest power plants isn’t legally feasibleA surge in solar power boosted the proportion of renewables in Australia’s energy mix in 2019, while coal’s dominance wanedCommonwealth Fusion Systems, a nuclear-fusion startup, raised another $84m, underscoring investors’ steady appetite for new technologies to mitigate climate changeSocialThe U.K.’s accounting watchdog will investigate KPMG and PricewaterhouseCoopers, two of the country’s largest auditors, over their work for Eddie Stobart LogisticsIvory Coast plans to reject a U.S.-led survey on the prevalence of child labor in its cocoa industryThe video of an altercation on Monday between a white female executive and a black man in Central Park went viral almost immediately. Within 24 hours, the woman was out of a jobU.K. mothers are more likely to have lost their job, be on reduced hours and be caring for children while working than their male partners during the coronavirus crisisGovernanceEasyJet CFO Andrew Findlay plans to leave the company next year after facing down a demand for his removal from the board in a dramatic shareholder voteThe Dutch government, one of the top shareholders in Air France-KLM, voted against the resolutions on the remuneration of CEO Ben SmithNorway is about to reveal whether the man chosen to run its $1 trillion wealth fund has passed a key test to prove he won’t be bogged down by conflicts of interestSustainable FinanceTrafigura Group is planning a major increase in renewable-energy investments over the next five yearsInflows to ESG-focused ETFs declined 25% to $878.9m in the past weekNorinchukin invests $1.4 billion in World Bank ESG bondsNWB Bank partners with Japan’s GPIF on sustainability bondsIDB launches Australian dollar sustainable development bondNew Issues:Deutsche Bank plans to sell EU500m senior preferred green bondCAF selling Covid-19 social bondsBBVA in market with Covid-19 social bondsNational University of Singapore raises first green bondHungary is planning calls with investors about green bondsSevern Trent Utilities is selling GBP-denominated 20Y sustainable bondPearson Funding plans to sell social bondsResearch and AnalysisFrom BloombergNEF analysts:Rising funding costs for commercial banks from the global pandemic has lifted the all-in expenses for renewable energy projects in Europe, but so far the impact has been modest for those developers that have secured their long-term revenuesThe solar market probably will dip in 2020 depending on what’s next for Covd-19U.S. residential solar shows signs of recoveryCost of power from battery storage has halved since 2018India’s first round-the-clock renewables project will require innovative design strategies to be ready for 2022 and meet its energy output requirementFrom Bloomberg Intelligence analysts:For base metals companies such as Cameco and BHP, elevating ESG factors to the boardroom and adding links to executive pay may indicate better management with direct performance incentivesOil companies can accommodate the threat to gasoline demand posed by electric vehicles in the near term, partly because policy support across U.S. states is mixed and sometimes mutableFor more research, click BNEF and BI ESGFeatured Data: Search “green” on LEAG for data on the biggest managers of green bonds and loansESG Charts and Related Indexes“Slim hogs” are the latest sign that U.S. meat shortages are easingWeekly RoundupsFor the weekly “Good Business” newsletter, click hereFor the weekly wrap of green bond sales, click hereFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The World's Smartest Oil Traders Have Taken to the Seas
    Bloomberg

    The World's Smartest Oil Traders Have Taken to the Seas

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The waters off the South African oil storage terminal at Saldanha Bay are getting busy. A small flotilla of tankers full of crude is idling near the busy shipping lanes that link the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Their presence, along with similar gatherings of ships all around the world, will be a potential source of oil price volatility for months to come, as global demand begins to recover amid the biggest production shutdown in the oil industry’s 160-year history.Ships full of crude have been forced to anchor off the coasts of the U.S., China, Europe and elsewhere, as refiners have cut back processing and onshore storage tanks have been filled to near capacity. All over the world, tankers are being used to store oil instead.The reasons for most of this expensive excess storage is obvious: the global supply glut. But there’s something else at play here too as some of the world’s smartest oil traders have filled up tankers to take advantage once crude prices start motoring again.The floating supplies of oil are vast. Tankers carrying enough crude to satisfy 20% of the world’s daily consumption gathered off California’s coast in April with nowhere to go. Most are still there. At Durban, 800 miles to the east of Saldanha Bay, six giant Suezmax tankers, each holding about 1 million barrels of crude, have been anchored for up to six weeks. More tankers have amassed off Africa’s northwest corner, around the entrance to the Mediterranean Sea, after processors in Spain, southern France and Italy all cut runs or shuttered refineries.The vessels now off Saldanha Bay began to arrive in early April, carrying crude from Nigeria, Angola and the Republic of Congo. They have been joined over the past two weeks by four more ships, each of which loaded a similar volume of crude in the U.S. Gulf Coast.The area near Africa’s southern tip has always been a favorite place to hold cargoes of West African crude awaiting buyers in far-flung parts of the world. It is safer than locations farther north, where piracy has increased. It also gives owners the choice to send cargoes to either Asia or Europe, depending on where the most profitable opportunities arise.Holding oil in ships is more expensive than storing it in onshore tanks, but owners can respond much more rapidly to selling opportunities.Several of the vessels off South Africa were chartered by leading oil-trading companies, including Vitol Group, the world’s biggest independent oil trader; Glencore Plc, through its ST Shipping subsidiary; and Mecuria Energy Group Ltd., according to fixture data compiled by Bloomberg. The presence of such big-name traders suggests that these aren’t all just cargoes waiting to discharge into congested tanks, but are also the visible parts of trading strategies aimed at making the most of the first signs of a recovery in global oil demand.As I said above, the presence of many of these tankers can be explained by full onshore storage tanks, slower discharging operations and reduced refinery runs. But others will be the result of so-called contango plays, where traders buy cheap crude on the physical market and sell forward contracts to lock in a profit. Some are probably just waiting for prices to rise enough to make the cargo profitable.The eventual unloading of all of these floating supplies will have a significant bearing on the oil price. The gradual drawing down of the huge offshore stockpiles owned by refiners will help keep a lid on prices. But those held by canny traders will be sold whenever and wherever they are most profitable, and that will keep prices volatile.If you were hoping for a smooth recovery in crude prices as the initial disruption of the coronavirus epidemic recedes, think again.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Julian Lee is an oil strategist for Bloomberg. Previously he worked as a senior analyst at the Centre for Global Energy Studies.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Poor Oil States Struggle to Repay Loans to Commodity Traders
    Bloomberg

    Poor Oil States Struggle to Repay Loans to Commodity Traders

    (Bloomberg) -- Some of the world’s poorest oil-producing countries are slipping behind on payments for billions of dollars in oil-for-cash loans from commodity trading houses, putting them at risk of default.The so-called prepayment deals, in which a trading house advances a nation money to be repaid with future oil shipments, have been popular among some African and Middle East oil nations as the only way to raise funds. But they have also proved controversial: in some cases they create an opaque source of debt that governments find hard to pay back when oil prices plunge.The Kurdistan region of northern Iraq is now struggling to repay a $500 million loan from commodity giant Glencore Plc, according to documents reviewed by Bloomberg News. Glencore and rival trader Trafigura Group Ltd. are also in talks to restructure oil-for-cash loans of about $1.5 billion with the Republic of Congo, according to people familiar with the matter. And Chad, one of the poorest countries in the world, is using a clause in its oil-for-cash contract worth more than $1 billion to reduce payments.Global Witness, a non-governmental organization, has called the loans a “gamble on the future oil price”, warning countries that they can become an “open-ended liability for future governments and generations.”As the loans are repaid with cargoes of oil, when the market price plunges, countries need to divert more barrels to keep up with the payments. In a worst-case situation, like in 2016 for Chad, it could mean devoting a country’s entire petroleum output to repaying the loans.Offloading RiskWhile commodity traders thrive on price volatility, rather than on whether prices are high or low, they are also exposed to declines in commodity prices through these loans.In most cases, they offload the risk by syndicating the loans to banks, buying credit insurance, and -- in at least one case -- selling notes to institutional investors like pension funds. That would mean losses elsewhere in the financial system if the deals are restructured.Glencore and Trafigura declined to comment. A representative of the Kurdish oil ministry didn’t respond to request for comments. The government of the Republic of Congo declined to comment.Oil prices have collapsed this year after dozens of countries closed their economies in an effort to stop the spread of coronavirus, sharply reducing energy demand. The crash was compounded by a price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia that eventually lead to negative prices.In the case of Kurdistan, global investors including U.S. pension funds are on the hook for potential losses as they bought $500 million worth of five-year notes known as Oilflow SPV 1 DAC linked to the loans. Glencore has told noteholders that it would soon present “a formal proposal” to restructure the deal, according to a notice posted on the Cayman Islands Stock Exchange.The value of the Oilflow SPV 1 notes has plunged because of the potential restructuring, trading recently at about 80 cents on the dollar, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That implies a yield of more than 40%. They originally offered 12%.Chad told the International Monetary Fund that it plans to repay an oil loan of more than $1 billion from a Glencore-led syndicate more slowly than anticipated, using a clause in the contract that allows it to reduce payments when prices drop below $42 a barrel. Brent crude is trading at around $35.Chad has already restructured the loans with the Glencore-led syndicate twice since they were first subscribed in 2013. At the end of 2019, the African country owed the trading house directly $379 million, and another $778 million to syndicate banks.Republic of Congo has been trying to restructure its oil-for-cash loans for nearly a year, but a tentative deal reached in late 2019 was derailed after prices crashed. The African nation is now in fresh talks with Trafigura and Glencore. The traders are negotiating with Congo about extending the maturity of the loans, according to one person familiar with the matter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Sulphur squeeze spells trouble for Congo's copper and cobalt miners
    Reuters

    Sulphur squeeze spells trouble for Congo's copper and cobalt miners

    Disruptions caused by the coronavirus crisis have pushed up prices for sulphur by about 10% this year in the Democratic Republic of Congo, driving up costs of a vital ingredient for mining cobalt and copper in the African nation. Coronavirus lockdowns and border closures in South Africa and parts of Zambia and Congo have disrupted transport and other logistics, delaying essential mining supplies. Congo, the world's biggest cobalt producer, accounted for 70% of global supplies in 2019 of the metal that is used in alloys for jet engines and batteries for phones and electric cars.

  • The Glencore share price – where next?
    Stockopedia

    The Glencore share price – where next?

    The Glencore (LON:GLEN) share price has risen by 9.00% over the past month and it’s currently trading at 149.18. For investors considering whether to buy, hold...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    FTSE 100 gains as solid China data lifts energy, mining stocks

    London's FTSE 100 rose on Friday after two straight days of losses as a jump in China's factory output for the first time in 2020 powered miners and oil and gas producers, while investors remained cautious about a looming coronavirus-fuelled recession. The commodity-heavy FTSE 100 was up 1.2%, with BP Plc and Royal Dutch Shell Plc providing the biggest boost. The mid-cap FTSE 250 rose 1% with data showing China's industrial production climbed a faster-than-expected 3.9% in April as the country returned to work after months of coronavirus-induced lockdowns.

  • Norway wealth fund blacklists Glencore, other commodity giants over coal
    Reuters

    Norway wealth fund blacklists Glencore, other commodity giants over coal

    Norway's $1 trillion wealth fund is excluding some of the world's biggest commodities firms from its portfolio for their use and production of coal, including Glencore <GLEN.L> and Anglo American <AAL.L>. Underlining the growing role of climate considerations for long-term investors, the fund is also excluding German utility RWE <RWEG.DE>, South African petrochemicals firm Sasol <SOLJ.J> and Australian company AGL Energy <AGL.AX> over their use of coal. The fund, set up in 1996 to save Norway's oil revenues for future generations, now holds about 1.5% of globally listed shares and its decisions are often followed by other investors.

  • Reuters

    Norway wealth fund excludes Glencore, Anglo American, RWE, others for coal use and production

    Norway's $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund said on Wednesday it was excluding Glencore <GLEN.L>, Anglo American <AAL.L>, RWE <RWEG.DE>, Sasol <SOLJ.J> and AGL Energy<AGL.AX> for their use and production of coal under updated ethical guidelines. Another set of companies - BHP <BHP.AX> <BHPB.L>, Uniper <UN01.DE>, Enel <ENEI.MI> and Vistra Energy <VST.N> - were put under observation for possible exclusion at a later stage if they do not address their use or production of coal.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    RPT-COLUMN- As demand implodes, the zinc supply chain starts to adjust: Andy Home

    The London Metal Exchange (LME) zinc price has bounced by 20% from its March low of $1,685 a tonne to $2,020. Lockdowns and quarantine measures have taken a particularly heavy toll of the zinc supply chain, with mine closures in key producer countries such as Peru and Mexico. Analysts at Goldman Sachs estimate that 25% of global zinc mine supply has been forced either to shut down completely or curtail operations.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    COLUMN- As demand implodes, the zinc supply chain starts to adjust: Andy Home

    The London Metal Exchange (LME) zinc price has bounced by 20% from its March low of $1,685 a tonne to $2,020. Lockdowns and quarantine measures have taken a particularly heavy toll of the zinc supply chain, with mine closures in key producer countries such as Peru and Mexico. Analysts at Goldman Sachs estimate that 25% of global zinc mine supply has been forced either to shut down completely or curtail operations.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Copper giant Peru to gradually ease restrictions on mining sector in May

    Peru will gradually ease restrictions on key sectors including mining and construction in May, the government said in a decree on Sunday, after activity had been virtually paralyzed since mid-March by the coronavirus pandemic and a nationwide lockdown. In the decree published in the official newspaper El Peruano, the government said the exploitation, storage and transportation of large-scale mining could be restarted, as well as key construction projects, some related to hydrocarbons. Peru is the world's second largest producer of copper and is heavily dependent on the sector for economic growth.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    RPT-Glencore's Zambia subsidiary to resume mining operations temporarily

    Glencore's Zambian subsidiary Mopani Copper Mines (MCM) will resume mining operations for 90 days but still expects to go ahead with its initial plan to place its mining operations on care and maintenance, the local firm said on Sunday. Glencore's original announcement that it planned to put MCM under "care and maintenance" sparked a backlash from Zambia's government, which threatened to revoke the firm's mining licences saying it had not given enough notice. Mopani said in a statement that constructive discussions had taken place with the Zambian government.

  • Glencore Joins in Mining Industry’s Rush to Cut Spending
    Bloomberg

    Glencore Joins in Mining Industry’s Rush to Cut Spending

    (Bloomberg) -- Glencore Plc joined rivals in cutting spending plans this year as the world’s biggest commodity trader moves to protect its balance sheet from the global pandemic.The company will reduce capital expenses in 2020 to between $4 billion and $4.5 billion from its previous forecast of $5.5 billion. The cuts are a result of some project deferrals, lower production and falling input costs. Glencore also lowered output forecasts for metals such as zinc and ferrochrome after operations were disrupted.Several mines around the world have been forced to slow or temporarily close as countries wrestle to contain the spread of Covid-19. Other producers including BHP Group and Rio Tinto Group have also announced plans to review or lower capital spending, putting the brakes on development projects as they seek to maximize cash.Read More: Rio Flags Spending Curbs as Virus Impact Stalls Global Projects“Given our strong liquidity position and resilient business model, we are well positioned to navigate the current challenges,” Glencore Chief Executive Officer Ivan Glasenberg said in a statement Thursday.The world’s biggest mining companies have so far been comparatively unscathed by the global pandemic as demand from China holds up and many of the most important mines continue to operate. Still, there is growing concern that the spread of the virus could lead to disruption at key assets that drive profits.Glencore has already taken measures to protect its balance sheet from a potential deterioration. Last month it said it will defer its proposed $2.6 billion dividend and will review the decision when it reports interim results later in the year. The company has also shuttered some unprofitable assets.Glencore lowered the production goals for all its commodities, with the most material declines in zinc and ferrochrome, which have been disrupted by shutdowns in Canada, Peru and South Africa. It also suspended its oil output guidance as assets in Chad are moved to care and maintenance.The company lowered its cost forecasts after accounting for lower input costs such as oil and favorable foreign-exchange movements. It also benefited from higher prices for precious metals it mines as byproducts.Glencore said earnings in the trading business are so far within its long-term guidance range of $2.2 billion to $3.2 billion.The shares rose 1.3% by 8:12 a.m. in London, paring this year’s decline to 33%. (Updates with production changes from seventh paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Glencore slashes spending and output guidance, says can ride out coronavirus
    Reuters

    Glencore slashes spending and output guidance, says can ride out coronavirus

    Glencore <GLEN.L> cut its 2020 capital expenditure and output targets on Thursday to reflect the impact of the coronavirus on its operations, saying the belt-tightening left it well placed to weather the pandemic. The miner and trader, reporting first-quarter production data, said spending for the year would fall by $1 billion-$1.5 billion from an original expectation of $5.5 billion. Government restrictions to curb the spread of COVID-19 forced miners including Glencore to shut some operations while the industry also lowered spending for the year.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Glencore slashes 2020 spending, production guidance as coronavirus hits

    Glencore on Thursday cut its capital expenditure and production targets for most of its metals in 2020 as the coronavirus worsened the economic outlook and hit its business. The London-listed miner said 2020 spending would fall by $1 billion-$1.5 billion from an original expectation of $5.5 billion. Glencore said copper production in its first quarter fell 9% to 293,000 tonnes compared to the same period a year ago, while cobalt output slid 44% to 6,100 tonnes as it shut its Congo operations.

  • South Africa Maintains Challenge to Oil Sale Despite Slump
    Bloomberg

    South Africa Maintains Challenge to Oil Sale Despite Slump

    (Bloomberg) -- South Africa said it will proceed with a court case to invalidate the sale in 2015 of its strategic oil stocks, despite crude prices recently dropping below what traders paid at the time.The $280 million deal for 10 million barrels of South Africa’s reserves, criticized as a rip off when oil prices were in a slump, was sold to Taleveras Group and joint ventures led by Vitol Group and Glencore Plc. That’s a better deal than what traders might pay today, with international benchmark Brent crude at about $21 a barrel.South Africa’s Strategic Fuel Fund, or SFF, “cannot be seen to honor an illegal sale of strategic stock by withdrawing a court process in lieu of oil-price fluctuations,” it said in a reply to questions. “We are therefore forging ahead to have the sale of this strategic stock be nullified.”The SFF failed to notify the National Treasury of a sale of crude oil reserves and to properly safeguard the assets, the nation’s Auditor-General said in a 2016 report to lawmakers. The fund initially described the transaction as a rotation of stocks.Glencore and Vitol declined to comment.Taleveras in 2017 said the fund should have used the proceeds of the sale to buy fresh reserves. The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy didn’t immediately comment on whether it plans to replenish reserves at current oil prices.(Updates with current crude price in second paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    RPT-COLUMN-Lockdowns and low prices generate nickel supply shock: Andy Home

    Metals have priced in the demand shock, or at least the first-stage demand shock, rippling around the world with the spread of COVID-19. The index of the major base metals traded on the London Metal Exchange (LME) bottomed out on March 23 and has since rebounded by 7%. Now the game is to assess the size of the supply shock to follow as national lockdowns force mines to curtail operations while low prices push some higher-cost operators out of the market altogether.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    COLUMN-Lockdowns and low prices generate nickel supply shock: Andy Home

    Metals have priced in the demand shock, or at least the first-stage demand shock, rippling around the world with the spread of COVID-19. The index of the major base metals traded on the London Metal Exchange (LME) bottomed out on March 23 and has since rebounded by 7%. Now the game is to assess the size of the supply shock to follow as national lockdowns force mines to curtail operations while low prices push some higher-cost operators out of the market altogether.

  • This FTSE 100 share is down 40% in 2020! Here’s why I’m buying it in this stock market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    This FTSE 100 share is down 40% in 2020! Here’s why I’m buying it in this stock market crash

    The stock market crash has impacted some FTSE 100 shares more than others, leaving room for lucrative investment opportunities.The post This FTSE 100 share is down 40% in 2020! Here's why I'm buying it in this stock market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • 1 FTSE 100 stock I’d buy and 1 I’d sell in the stock market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    1 FTSE 100 stock I’d buy and 1 I’d sell in the stock market crash

    This Fool takes a look at one FTSE 100 stock that's fallen 50% over the past few months and explains why he'd buy it while selling its peer. The post 1 FTSE 100 stock I'd buy and 1 I'd sell in the stock market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Upbeat broker recommendations for Glencore
    Stockopedia

    Upbeat broker recommendations for Glencore

    The Glencore (LON:GLEN) share price has risen by 23.9% over the past month and it’s currently trading at 140.3. For investors considering whether to buy, hold8230;

  • Glencore's Congo unit Katanga Mining to go private, warns of possible COVID-19 impact
    Reuters

    Glencore's Congo unit Katanga Mining to go private, warns of possible COVID-19 impact

    Glencore <GLEN.L> is taking its Toronto-listed Congo business Katanga Mining <KAT.TO> private, the subsidiary said on Wednesday, citing limited trading liquidity and the costs of a stock exchange listing as reasons for the move. Katanga Mining, which produces copper and cobalt from mines in the southern copper belt of Democratic Republic of Congo, was first listed in August 1997 and Glencore owns 99.46% of its shares. Katanga shareholders other than Glencore, including Blackrock and nine other minority holders, will receive 0.16 Canadian dollars in cash per share - a 100% premium to the closing price on Tuesday, and a special committee of Katanga's board recommended they approve the deal, the statement said.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Zambia mining firms seek government relief amid coronavirus

    The Zambia Chamber of Mines has urged the government to urgently engage with the sector and agree relief measures to address the issues facing mining companies in the midst of COVID-19. The chamber said in a statement it had submitted a broad three-phase economic plan to the government, to urgently manage the economic impact arising from the coronavirus pandemic. This proposal included immediate relief measures that could be followed by an emergency support package whose financing could be sought from the IMF and World Bank, the chamber said.

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