AAL.L - Anglo American plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
1,891.80
+67.00 (+3.67%)
As of 2:41PM BST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close1,824.80
Open1,849.80
Bid1,892.20 x 0
Ask1,893.40 x 0
Day's range1,838.80 - 1,895.40
52-week range1,018.20 - 2,283.50
Volume1,501,502
Avg. volume4,839,127
Market cap25.786B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.22
PE ratio (TTM)6.85
EPS (TTM)276.00
Earnings date30 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.89 (4.77%)
Ex-dividend date12 Mar 2020
1y target est24.50
  • £1k to invest in an ISA? 2 dirt-cheap FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy to retire early
    Fool.co.uk

    £1k to invest in an ISA? 2 dirt-cheap FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy to retire early

    Investing in an ISA is the perfect choice if you want to build a passive income. Roland Head looks at two FTSE 100 dividend stocks he'd buy today.The post £1k to invest in an ISA? 2 dirt-cheap FTSE 100 dividend stocks I'd buy to retire early appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • BHP Overstayed in Petroleum. Time to Exit
    Bloomberg

    BHP Overstayed in Petroleum. Time to Exit

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- BHP Group’s future can do without hydrocarbons.The world’s largest digger is among the last heavyweights to mix mines with a significant presence in oil, a combination that is becoming harder to justify over the long term. Crude demand will be slow to recover after a pandemic that has kept workers home and jets grounded, and some of that appetite will never come back. Meanwhile, pressure to cut carbon emissions is only increasing. Oil giant BP Plc is the  latest to take a hit, warning it expects impairments and write-offs worth as much as $17.5 billion due to a more gloomy view of what lies ahead. The Big Australian could benefit from a dose of that realism.There is little question that the petroleum division, with assets from Western Australia to the Gulf of Mexico, has generated impressive cash over the years — if you exclude the ill-considered foray into U.S. shale, a $20 billion investment (excluding capital expenditure) much criticized by activist fund Elliott Management Corp. and eventually sold off in 2018. In the six months to December 2019, the unit accounted for about 13% of BHP’s total earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization, notching up an impressive 65% margin. Only iron ore, the group’s top earner, was higher, at 69%. Add in low production costs that cushion the blow of 2020’s lackluster oil prices, and it’s easy to see why putting in more cash is tempting when, as analyst Glyn Lawcock of UBS Group AG points out, the miner has few readily available alternative investments.It’s also true that while the medium-term global appetite for oil looks far less certain than it did, there’s a more appealing argument to be made around fading supply. Indeed, the $115 billion miner’s central expectation last year of demand hitting a high point in the mid-2030s now looks bullish, compared to comments from the likes of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP. A peak even in the middle of this decade, BHP’s low-demand scenario, may prove optimistic. On the production side, though, the miner is right to point out that the industry has been investing less, a trend that will only accelerate after a disastrous 2020 and squeeze future production. BHP has estimated ongoing natural field decline at a rate of 3% to 5% per year.None of this means boss Mike Henry and his team can afford to ignore the signs that this year will prove to be a turning point for oil.Diversification has benefits, but operating synergies between oil and mining are debatable — it’s not an accident that while majors sold out of one or the other, none have returned. As a standalone business, the petroleum division might arguably have ventured less enthusiastically into shale. And the risk today is clear: Staying on can turn into overstaying.Here, Henry can reflect on the experience in thermal coal, where BHP woke up too late. Rival Rio Tinto Group offloaded its last coal mine in 2018, wrapping up a process that began in 2013. BHP held on to decent assets, using up tax losses. It’s now trying to retreat just as Anglo American Plc prepares to hive off its South African coal mines, and interest in the dirty fuel has dwindled. Oil has fewer easy substitutes, but it's conceivable that, with significant changes in policy, crude could be left similarly stranded. Accepting the need for an exit from a business that BHP has been in since the 1960s is only the first step, of course. For one, a carve-out in the mold of coal-to-aluminium producer South32 Ltd., which BHP spun off successfully in 2015, is harder to advocate for oil. The move then was about getting more out of sub-scale operations. In petroleum, BHP is not the operator for many of the assets, making such efficiencies harder to accomplish.BHP can begin by reviewing its portfolio, starting with mature assets in Australia. Partner Exxon Mobil Corp. has said that it’s seeking a buyer for its share of the Gippsland Basin oil and gas development in the Bass Strait; a joint sale with BHP has been considered before. Chevron Corp., meanwhile,  has put  its stake in the giant North West Shelf liquefied natural gas venture on the block. That operation, Australia’s largest LNG project, is shifting from processing its own gas to opening services to new suppliers, a business known as tolling — less suited to either Chevron or BHP. The mining giant has  in any event been less enthusiastic about gas than oil.Granted, even that won’t be easy. Australia churns up a decent amount of revenue, and BHP can argue it is better to continue taking cash now, at the risk of selling for less later. Some investors may agree. A similarly short-term view in the Gulf of Mexico could see it adding to the portfolio as distressed rivals are forced out.For newish boss Henry, though, none of those would look like the decisions of a company preparing for a greener future. He has an opportunity to outline the path to net zero emissions when BHP announces full-year results in August. An exit plan for oil would be one decisive step toward that goal.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Clara Ferreira Marques is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities and environmental, social and governance issues. Previously, she was an associate editor for Reuters Breakingviews, and editor and correspondent for Reuters in Singapore, India, the U.K., Italy and Russia.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Anglo American could appeal to contrarian value investors
    Stockopedia

    Why Anglo American could appeal to contrarian value investors

    Contrarian value investors are always on the look-out for shares that the market has overlooked. In times of economic uncertainty - when stock prices become er...

  • Upbeat broker recommendations for Anglo American
    Stockopedia

    Upbeat broker recommendations for Anglo American

    The Anglo American (LON:AAL) share price has risen by 10.1% over the past month and it’s currently trading at 1848. For investors considering whether to buy, h...

  • SIPP investing ideas: 3 bargain FTSE 100 shares I’d hold for 30 years
    Fool.co.uk

    SIPP investing ideas: 3 bargain FTSE 100 shares I’d hold for 30 years

    These 3 SIPP investing ideas combine bargain FTSE 100 blue-chip shares with proven quality. Tom Rodgers looks for bargains galore.The post SIPP investing ideas: 3 bargain FTSE 100 shares I’d hold for 30 years appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Brokers bullish on Anglo American shares
    Stockopedia

    Brokers bullish on Anglo American shares

    The Anglo American (LON:AAL) share price has risen by 23.5% over the past month and it’s currently trading at 1778. For investors considering whether to buy, h...

  • Two major factors that could drive the Anglo American share price
    Stockopedia

    Two major factors that could drive the Anglo American share price

    Shares in Anglo American (LON:AAL) are currently trading at 1778, but a key question for investors is how much the current economic uncertainty will affect the...

  • No growth, no problem! 3 high dividend stocks where I would invest
    Fool.co.uk

    No growth, no problem! 3 high dividend stocks where I would invest

    As a growth investor, I don't see much in the way of future growth in the economy. Maybe it’s time to buy good dividend stocks that are cheap instead.The post No growth, no problem! 3 high dividend stocks where I would invest appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • What will drive the Anglo American share price higher?
    Stockopedia

    What will drive the Anglo American share price higher?

    Shares in Anglo American (LON:AAL) are currently trading at 1685.58 but a key question for investors is how the economic uncertainty caused by Coronavirus will...

  • Bloomberg

    Metals Can Leap Over the Oil Slick

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- After 2008, metals and oil rebounded together from the depths of the financial crisis, as China’s consumption of raw materials took off. This time, their recoveries may look quite different.Crude faces a lengthy convalescence from the catastrophic lows of April, when U.S. oil plunged into negative territory. Industrial metal prices have fallen far less, and look healthier: Closures to control the spread of coronavirus in countries like Peru have squeezed production, just as China is gearing up. Add in Beijing’s infrastructure plans, expected to be outlined at the National People’s Congress meeting starting Friday, plus the prospect of green stimulus and more mineral-intensive clean energy, and the outlook looks rosier still.Copper is indicative of these divergent paths. Out of other metals, Bloomberg Intelligence reckons it has moved most closely with oil over 160 years — a coefficient of 0.96 over that time. The link is beginning to weaken, and the current crisis will only make that more pronounced.Why so?Oil has certainly made an impressive comeback over the past few weeks: Many producers are still losing money, but West Texas Intermediate is back above $30, and there was no repeat of April’s crash when the contract rolled over this week. Brent crude is up almost 90% after last month dropping below $20. That’s because the supply glut has shrunk, thanks to the end of Russia’s price war with Saudi Arabia and significant involuntary shutdowns among U.S. producers, easing concerns about global storage capacity. That’s helpful, even if improving prices could bring back some shale activity.Metals have also taken a hit to output from coronavirus lockdowns in Latin America and elsewhere. In late April, BMO analysts estimated these affected 23% of global capacity for copper, 15% for nickel and 24% for zinc. Projects like Anglo American Plc’s Quellaveco in Peru, where workers downed tools, could see delays. That’s helped copper to rise back toward a modest $5,500 per metric ton.Supply reductions aren’t enough to make a difference without better demand, though, and that’s where the divergence becomes clearer. China tells part of the story. Construction activity and manufacturing are on the mend, drawing down metal inventories. It’s true that oil consumption is reviving, too: China’s taxis, buses and cars have been back at normal levels since early April, and traffic congestion has returned. But while that’s good news for gasoline and local refiners, it’s hardly salvation for global oil. Recoveries elsewhere are progressing more slowly and most of the world’s aircraft are still grounded. Simply put, China’s recovery matters more for metals, with the country accounting for roughly half of global consumption. By comparison, it makes up less than 14% of oil demand.Now consider the cautious nature of Beijing’s economic reboot, which is a signal for other countries, and the bumps along the post-pandemic road to recovery. These make the picture darker for oil. Factories might keep producing washing machines, but more of us will stay away from leisure travel and work from home if incidents like the reappearance of the virus in China’s northeast repeat themselves. It’s not even clear that an aversion to the risks of public transport will get us back in our cars again, as my colleague David Fickling has pointed out. Demand for personal protective equipment like masks is hardly enough to offset a drop in gasoline and even jet fuel, which past experience suggests will take years to recover.The NPC is expected to include a revived version of past efforts to develop the country’s western hinterland, alongside other stimulus efforts. No one anticipates a boost akin to what was seen in 2008. Even a similar amount would probably have a weaker multiplier effect — yet the boost will matter for copper, zinc and more. And that’s before the wider green fiscal push, in and outside China, that favors mined materials needed for batteries, grids and energy storage. The solar industry in Asia-Pacific alone is expected to use around 378,000 tons of copper by 2027, almost double 2018 levels.Mark Lewis, global head of sustainability research at BNP Paribas Asset Management, splits the long-term pressures in three: the world’s push toward reducing carbon emissions, cheap renewable energy and air pollution, highlighted by the clear blue skies of recent weeks. Add in the behavioral changes brought by the pandemic and the future of oil is more uncertain than ever, he argues. With even Royal Dutch Shell Plc arguing that peak oil demand will come sooner than expected, it’s hard to disagree.There may not be a uniform global green stimulus, and some ambitions will remain just that. Yet a World Bank report last week gives an indication of the potential growth story: It says the goal of limiting the global temperature rise to 2 degrees Celsius will require production of graphite, lithium, and cobalt to ramp up by more than 450% by 2050, compared with 2018, in order to meet energy storage requirements. Aluminum and copper, used across technologies, will also be in demand. And that’s excluding infrastructure like transmission lines.In the future we’ll still need oil. We just might need metals more.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Clara Ferreira Marques is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities and environmental, social and governance issues. Previously, she was an associate editor for Reuters Breakingviews, and editor and correspondent for Reuters in Singapore, India, the U.K., Italy and Russia.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Norway wealth fund excludes Glencore, Anglo American, RWE, others for coal use and production

    Norway's $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund said on Wednesday it was excluding Glencore , Anglo American, RWE, Sasol and AGL Energy for their use and production of coal under updated ethical guidelines. Another set of companies - BHP , Uniper , Enel and Vistra Energy - were put under observation for possible exclusion at a later stage if they do not address their use or production of coal.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    S. Africa mining firms work together against COVID-19 as mines reopen

    South African mining companies are setting up shared quarantine facilities for miners testing positive for COVID-19 and are discussing other ways to cooperate, as the vital national industry gradually restarts operations halted since late March. President Cyril Ramaphosa agreed last week to partially ease a national lockdown that temporarily shut all mines, except for some production of coal, the main fuel used for power generation in Africa's most industrialised nation. All mines can resume activities from May 1 under regulations to ease the lockdown, gradually resuming work in an industry that accounts for 8% of South Africa's economic output and employs about 500,000 people.

  • Analysts optimistic on Anglo American outlook
    Stockopedia

    Analysts optimistic on Anglo American outlook

    The Anglo American (LON:AAL) share price has risen by 2.47% over the past month and it’s currently trading at 1423.6. For investors considering whether to buy,8230;

  • Diamonds Need Some New Best Friends
    Bloomberg

    Diamonds Need Some New Best Friends

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It’s looking decidedly somber out there for the world’s favorite sparkly stone.Diamonds were ailing even before the coronavirus came along. Now, weeks into lockdowns in the U.S. and elsewhere, all but the largest diggers, polishers and retailers are struggling for cash. Unable to sell its stones, Dominion Diamond Mines, the miner that sold luxury brand Harry Winston to Swatch Group AG in 2013, filed for insolvency protection late Wednesday. Anglo American Plc’s De Beers cut 2020 production guidance by a fifth Thursday, in line with demand.To secure their future, diamond giants may need a rebranding akin to the storytelling feat pulled off by Harry Oppenheimer, the late De Beers chairman who cultivated the engagement ring to overcome a slump after the Great Depression. In so doing, he forged a tradition that fueled sales for decades. Today, a refreshed myth-making effort could target the post-pandemic concerns of millennial consumers: marketing the diamond as a store of value in volatile times comparable to art, which is also authentic, traceable and sustainable.Since 2011, when prices peaked thanks to China’s new shoppers, diamonds have faltered. Lab-grown stones, initially priced confusingly close to the real thing, posed a challenge. To make things worse, a supply glut hit the market, pushing producers to cut prices. A 26-million-carat increase in 2017 was the largest single-year volume addition since 1986, according to consulting firm Bain & Co. Meanwhile, financing availability shrank dramatically as traditional lenders pulled away. A 2018 fraud scandal involving celebrated Indian jeweler Nirav Modi didn’t help. The coronavirus will accelerate some developments that aren’t unwelcome. In supply terms, the industry may look healthier if older or more marginal mines are obliged to stop digging. Rio Tinto Group last year had already announced the 2020 closure of its Argyle mine, which produces both low-quality gems and fabled pink diamonds, taking some 13 million carats out of global annual production of just over 140 million. The current crisis will add to that. In March, Dominion stopped work at its Ekati mine in Canada, and other pits have been closed or are working only partially. Not all will return.There will be a shakeout among polishers and perhaps more integration in some parts of the industry, of the sort demonstrated by Louis Vuitton’s purchase earlier this year of the largest rough diamond since 1905. Sales of rough and polished stones will change too, as travel restrictions in South Africa, Botswana and India push more deals online. It’s a remarkable feat for a conservative industry that thrives on face-to-face interaction, and arcane systems like De Beers’ “sights,” as its regular sales are known.Yet the scale of this health crisis, rapidly turning into an economic cataclysm, has also made other problems far worse. India’s polishers are not only strapped for credit, but also struggling with a weaker rupee, lockdowns and curfews; Thousands of workers have been forced to leave hubs like Surat altogether. Elsewhere, both diamantaires and jewelry buyers are stuck at home, making it harder to clear excess inventory. The flow of diamonds has dwindled to barely a trickle.The real concern is demand, where a grim outlook for disposable incomes suggests a hoped-for 2020 recovery is impossible, even as supply shrinks. The very top of the market may be insulated, but further down even China’s “revenge purchases” aren’t going to be enough. As my colleague Nisha Gopalan has pointed out, such splurges won’t save luxury products — especially if U.S. job losses continue to pile up. Inventory could flood the market, too.All this upheaval does makes it a good time to rethink the storytelling behind diamonds, though. Coordinated marketing, once the industry’s go-to solution, will need to make a comeback as consumers emerge from the wreckage of coronavirus. Post-pandemic values may change broadly.Three things could be highlighted. First, a store of value for the long term, especially for the largest gems where prices vary less. Like art, or fine wine, only wearable. Better yet, to appeal to the millennials that make up its consumer base, the industry can promote the stones’ authenticity, building on existing work around provenance and traceability, dating back to the Kimberley Process, the multilateral system aimed at ensuring the proceeds of diamond mining aren’t used to fund conflict. The industry is also sustainable, with relatively clean, chemical-free processes.Marketing spend has recovered after a dip in the past decade, but coordinated industry expenditure remains far below even the early 2000s. While the likes of De Beers and Alrosa PJSC may be reluctant to sponsor cash-strapped smaller rivals, it would be money well spent. Nearly seven decades after Marilyn Monroe’s immortal song, it's time for a new myth.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Clara Ferreira Marques is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities and environmental, social and governance issues. Previously, she was an associate editor for Reuters Breakingviews, and editor and correspondent for Reuters in Singapore, India, the U.K., Italy and Russia.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    RPT-COLUMN-Can coronavirus pandemic tame the wild palladium market?: Andy Home

    COVID-19 has roiled industrial metal markets with lockdowns around the world eviscerating demand, forcing mine closures and upending supply chains. Palladium, however, was a wild market before anyone had ever heard of the novel coronavirus.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    COLUMN-Can coronavirus pandemic tame the wild palladium market?: Andy Home

    COVID-19 has roiled industrial metal markets with lockdowns around the world eviscerating demand, forcing mine closures and upending supply chains. Palladium, however, was a wild market before anyone had ever heard of the novel coronavirus. The metallic demand shock caused by collapsing automotive production and sales has been a core driver of the metals price volatility.

  • Coronavirus: Mining bosses donate 30% of pay to COVID-19 fight
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: Mining bosses donate 30% of pay to COVID-19 fight

    Anglo American said its board and management would donate a third of their pay for three months to the fight against COVID-19.

  • Fortune Will Favor Miners with Nerves of Steel
    Bloomberg

    Fortune Will Favor Miners with Nerves of Steel

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- After years of buying at the peak of the economic cycle and selling in the trough, could the world’s big diggers do the reverse? Compared to peers in oil and gas, Rio Tinto Group and the largest diversified miners are riding out the coronavirus storm in sheltered positions: They have low operating costs, little debt and more than $60 billion in liquidity.History matters here. Just over a decade ago, miners binged on hubristic investments like Rio’s acquisition of aluminum producer Alcan or Anglo American Plc’s Minas Rio iron-ore venture. In the hangover years between 2012 and 2016, some $200 billion was written off, and a generation of chief executives were shown the door. It was a near-death experience akin to what the energy sector is going through today, and one that left behind an industry focused on cleaning up, cutting back and returning cash to shareholders. Rio has been among the most generous, handing back $36 billion since 2016.It means the industry’s largest players went into this crisis with two things: balance sheets at their most robust in years, and a pedestrian growth outlook. Almost the opposite is true at long-coveted targets like Freeport-McMoRan Inc., with a market value of $11 billion, and First Quantum Minerals Ltd., valued at $3.5 billion. These mid-size base metal producers are beginning to look fragile, with expanding copper mines but nearly $19 billion of total debt between them. Their shares have fallen more than 40% this year. No one knows how long a recovery from the pandemic will take, or what life will look like on the other side, but miners have a little more certainty than most: Metals like copper, used for electrification and a host of consumer goods, will be needed, and will be in short supply. It’s a tantalizing state of affairs. As ever, things aren’t quite that simple, and even the heftiest miners aren’t immune to the world’s turmoil. BHP Group has to contend with the crashing oil price. Anglo American is dealing with lockdowns in South Africa, Peru and elsewhere, as governments try to contain the spread of coronavirus. Glencore Plc, long the most buccaneering of the large players, is tackling succession, trouble in Zambia and a pending U.S. Department of Justice investigation into its business practices.At Rio, Chief Executive Officer Jean-Sebastien Jacques has perhaps the strongest motivation to act. He is less exposed to many of these uncertainties, and is running a miner that still relies on iron ore for about three-quarters of its Ebitda, as steel consumption hovers at or near a peak in China. Large mainland miners, like acquisitive Zijin Mining Group or Jiangxi Copper Co., may be his competitors. There are cashed-up bullion players, too: Barrick Gold Corp.’s CEO, Mark Bristow, has said he could consider copper and even Freeport’s Indonesian Grasberg mine.The trouble is, we’re not yet at the distress levels that will prompt boards to approve a rush for checkbooks. Travel and due diligence are impossible, markets are too volatile for share deals and the next few months remain an unknown quantity. Shareholders may balk. In past crises, even distressed sellers were able to command premiums, so bargains will be tough. Copper prices are still above the depths of 2016.Worse, not even the most obvious prey would be easy to snap up: Freeport and First Quantum come with traps. Freeport, the world’s largest listed copper producer, faces the question of who will lead it when veteran Richard Adkerson retires, along with concerns over older U.S. mines and the costly move underground at Grasberg. Rio, unhappy with the environmental and political risks, sold its interest in the Indonesian mine in 2018. First Quantum, more bite-sized and so perhaps more appealing, battened down the hatches earlier this year with a poison pill, after Jiangxi Copper built an 18% stake. Its flagship Cobre Panama mine has yet to  operate through a full wet season. Chinese players eyeing miners with Australian assets, meanwhile, would also have to deal with a regulator bent on discouraging opportunistic foreign bargain-hunters.Yet the longer the pandemic lockdowns drag on, the more the pain increases, as fixed costs go out and no cash comes in. It’s visible already in lithium, with Tianqi Lithium Corp. seeking to sell part of its stake in the Greenbushes operation in Australia, as it struggles to repay debt taken on to buy a stake in Chilean giant SQM. It’s rare to see large Chinese producers in distressed sales, even if lithium prices have plummeted since 2018. Rare-earth producer Lynas Corp., meanwhile, says it may need public funds to complete an ore-processing plant. Buyers won’t pounce yet. A global economic recovery isn’t in sight and will be slow; most will need a little more confidence that growth is coming back. That will mean a wider improvement than China’s stimulus and return to work, as encouraging as State Grid Corp.’s 2020 investment plans may be. They’ll also need travel restrictions to lift. Wait too long, though, and the opportunity to buy cheap will pass — again. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Clara Ferreira Marques is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities and environmental, social and governance issues. Previously, she was an associate editor for Reuters Breakingviews, and editor and correspondent for Reuters in Singapore, India, the U.K., Italy and Russia.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    GRAPHIC-Bets on potential mining defaults surge on worsening sector outlook

    The cost of insuring against potential debt default by mining companies has risen to the highest in five years on mounting fears of recession, demand destruction and shutdowns to contain the spread of the coronavirus. Commodity group Glencore's five-year credit default swaps (CDS) - which traders use as a hedge against uncertainty - were up at 443 basis points on Tuesday from 190 bps at the end of February, data from information provider IHS Markit showed. Glencore's relatively higher debt has driven the jump in its debt insurance costs, analysts said, while Anglo's climbed on its exposure to South Africa and the struggling diamond sector.

  • How Does Anglo American's (LON:AAL) P/E Compare To Its Industry, After The Share Price Drop?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Does Anglo American's (LON:AAL) P/E Compare To Its Industry, After The Share Price Drop?

    Unfortunately for some shareholders, the Anglo American (LON:AAL) share price has dived 30% in the last thirty days...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Anglo American expects hit to iron ore, coal in South Africa lockdown

    Anglo American said on Friday it expected a 2 million to 3 million tonne fall in production at its Kumba Iron Ore unit in South Africa this year and a drop of up to 2 million tonnes in output of export coal due to a three-week shutdown. The London-listed miner also lowered output of platinum and diamonds in South Africa, extended a slowdown in construction at its Quellaveco copper project in Peru and paused work in its Woodsmith polyhalite project in Britain.

  • Insider Buying: The Anglo American plc (LON:AAL) CEO & Director Just Bought US$1.1m Worth Of Shares
    Simply Wall St.

    Insider Buying: The Anglo American plc (LON:AAL) CEO & Director Just Bought US$1.1m Worth Of Shares

    Those following along with Anglo American plc (LON:AAL) will no doubt be intrigued by the recent purchase of shares by...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Colombia mining companies to reduce operations due to coronavirus

    Colombian mining companies, including coal producers Cerrejon and Drummond, will reduce operations to slow the spread of coronavirus, the sector's guild said on Tuesday. Some 15,000 workers directly employed in the industry will stop working, as will 18,000 indirect workers, the Colombian Mining Association (ACM) said in a statement. The Andean country will enter a nationwide 19-day quarantine late on Tuesday aimed at preventing further spread of coronavirus, which has killed more than 15,300 people worldwide.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    RPT-South African mining sector braces for coronavirus lockdown

    South African mining companies are bracing for a heavy hit from the country's looming nationwide lockdown to slow the spread of the coronavirus, warning of an expected leap in costs in addition to their lost output. A leading producer of metals and minerals such as platinum, palladium, coal, gold and iron ore, South Africa's labour-intensive mining industry is a potential hotbed of infection among the thousands of miners who often work in confined spaces, with some living nearby in cramped accommodation. President Cyril Ramaphosa on Monday imposed a 21-day lockdown from midnight on Thursday after a surge in coronavirus cases.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    South African mining sector braces for coronavirus lockdown

    South African mining companies are bracing for a heavy hit from the country's looming nationwide lockdown to slow the spread of the coronavirus, warning of an expected leap in costs in addition to their lost output. A leading producer of metals and minerals such as platinum, palladium, coal, gold and iron ore, South Africa's labour-intensive mining industry is a potential hotbed of infection among the thousands of miners who often work in confined spaces, with some living nearby in cramped accommodation.

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more