ABEA.DE - Alphabet Inc.

Frankfurt - Frankfurt Delayed price. Currency in EUR
1,119.20
-2.40 (-0.21%)
As of 8:54AM CEST. Market open.
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Previous close1,121.60
Open1,118.20
Bid1,117.40 x 0
Ask1,119.60 x 0
Day's range1,118.20 - 1,119.20
52-week range877.91 - 1,151.00
Volume2
Avg. volume2,057
Market cap781.928B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.70
PE ratio (TTM)22.59
EPS (TTM)49.53
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
  • Reuters

    Vietnam's social media crowd swells with new entrant to take on Facebook, Google

    A new social network has entered the already crowded field in Vietnam as the communist party squeezes U.S. tech giants Facebook and Google with a new cybersecurity law. Lotus, a social network that allows users to create content and share posts to a home page, had received 700 billion dong (£24.28 million) in funding from tech corporation VCCorp and hoped to raise another 500 billion dong, company General Director Nguyen The Tan said at the launch ceremony. "Lotus was born not to compete with Facebook or any other social networks," Tan said late on Monday.

  • Could Apple See a Rebound in iPhone Sales?
    Market Realist

    Could Apple See a Rebound in iPhone Sales?

    In a research note released yesterday, Apple (AAPL) analyst Ming Chi Kuo noted that more people from the US could choose the iPhone Pro than the iPhone 11.

  • EU Court: Google’s $1.1 Billion German Copyright Fee Unenforceable
    Market Realist

    EU Court: Google’s $1.1 Billion German Copyright Fee Unenforceable

    According to an EU court ruling, Google (GOOGL) will not have to pay a $1.1 billion copyright fee that a German publishing group demanded.

  • Bloomberg

    Lawmakers Seek Intel From Customers in Big Tech Probe

    (Bloomberg) -- A House panel investigating big tech companies for potential antitrust violations is seeking information from customers of Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook about the state of competition in digital markets and the adequacy of existing enforcement, according to documents reviewed by Bloomberg.It’s the latest development in the bipartisan congressional investigation being conducted by House antitrust subcommittee chair David Cicilline, a Democrat from Rhode Island.The eight-page survey doesn’t mention any companies by name, but it seeks information about the industries they dominate such as mobile apps and app stores, search engines, digital advertising, social media, messaging, online commerce and logistics as well as cloud computing.The survey asks respondents to identify the top five providers for the various digital services and how much it paid each of those providers since Jan. 1 2016. It also asks for any allegations of antitrust violations or business practices that hurt competition. The committee offered respondents the possibility of confidentiality if they desired.The panel has asked for responses to its survey by mid-October.Assessing AntitrustThe survey appears geared toward businesses that pay the big technology companies for services such as cloud computing, digital advertising and help selling mobile apps and products online. It doesn’t appear to focus on general retail consumers that buy products from Amazon or iPhones from Apple.It also shows how regulators are relying on customers and competitors of Big Tech to help them better understand digital markets and and how dominant players can stifle competition. The Federal Trade Commission has been quietly interviewing online merchants that sell goods on Amazon to better understand the business.The questionnaire shows the House panel trying to assess the grip big technology companies have in various markets, a first step in probing for antitrust violations. If the panel finds competition is so scant that the customers of big technology companies have no viable alternatives, it justifies further scrutiny of business practices as well as mergers and acquisitions.The questions also suggest the panel is open to examining how antitrust laws are applied in digital markets and if enforcement and laws need to be updated.A Google spokesman declined to comment. Apple didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment. Amazon and Facebook both declined to comment, but pointed to previous comments by executives in which both companies said they welcomed government scrutiny and maintain they exist in markets with healthy competition. Emails to representatives for the House committee weren’t immediately answered.The survey sent to customers follows the public disclosure of letters the House antitrust subcommittee sent to Google parent Alphabet Inc., Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc. and Apple Inc. Those letters, posted online, seek detailed information about acquisitions, business practices, executive communications, previous probes and lawsuits. The letters followed a July hearing in which lawmakers grilled tech executives.The House panel has been the most visible of various probes of technology companies. Representative Cicilline has been a vocal critic.Speaking at an antitrust conference in Washington, D.C. last week, he said, “you would be amazed” at the number of companies that have come forward with concerns about the potentially unfair way that big tech companies compete. Some have even expressed fear that the tech giants will respond with economic retaliation if the smaller companies’ concerns are made public, Cicilline said, without providing more detail.The House panel’s probe is part of a broader examination of the control companies such as Amazon, Google and Facebook have over the U.S. economy. The FTC is investigating Amazon and Facebook while the Justice Department is probing Google. Separately, 50 state attorneys general have announced an antitrust probe of Google.(Adds requested date for survey responses in fifth paragraph. An earlier version corrected the spelling of David Cicilline.)\--With assistance from Naomi Nix and Ben Brody.To contact the reporter on this story: Spencer Soper in Seattle at ssoper@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Ian FisherFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google Agrees to $1 Billion Settlement with France
    Market Realist

    Google Agrees to $1 Billion Settlement with France

    Google has agreed to make a one-time settlement of over $945 million euros to the French ministry. The ministry accused Google of evading taxes.

  • Google: Is Its News Service Trying to Get ahead of News Corp?
    Market Realist

    Google: Is Its News Service Trying to Get ahead of News Corp?

    Google (GOOGL) updated its online news search technology to prioritize original reporting when returning search results.

  • Big Tech Troubles: Will Google Staff Work Hard?
    Market Realist

    Big Tech Troubles: Will Google Staff Work Hard?

    This week has been rough for big tech companies. On Monday, 50 states and territories announced that they're launching an antitrust investigation into Google.

  • Robotaxis: Voyage versus Ford, Waymo, and Tesla
    Market Realist

    Robotaxis: Voyage versus Ford, Waymo, and Tesla

    Autonomous ride-sharing and robotaxi startup Voyage has raised about $31 million in the Series B round, according to its press release.

  • YouTube Podcasting Opens New Revenue Source for Google
    Market Realist

    YouTube Podcasting Opens New Revenue Source for Google

    The rise of YouTube podcasting opens a window for Google to the lucrative podcast advertising market. But Google now needs to support that growth.

  • Google to pay $1 billion in France to settle fiscal fraud probe
    Reuters

    Google to pay $1 billion in France to settle fiscal fraud probe

    Google agreed to pay close to 1 billion euros ($1.10 billion) to French authorities to settle a fiscal fraud probe that began four years ago in a deal that may create a legal precedent for other large tech companies present in the country. French investigators have been seeking to establish whether Google, whose European headquarters are based in Dublin, failed to pay its dues to the state by avoiding to declare parts of its activities in the country. The settlement comprises a fine of 500 million euros and additional taxes of 465 million euros, Google said in a statement.

  • Google to pay 465 million euros in additional taxes in France, boosting settlement to 1 billion
    Reuters

    Google to pay 465 million euros in additional taxes in France, boosting settlement to 1 billion

    Google said on Thursday it agreed to pay 465 million euros in additional taxes to French authorities, boosting the total settlement to end a fiscal fraud probe in the country to nearly 1 billion. France's financial prosecutor office earlier said Google had agreed to pay half a billion euros in fine to settle the four-year old investigation. "We have put an end to the tax and related disputes we had had in France for many years," Google said in a written statement.

  • How Huawei’s Trade Blacklist Work-Around Could Hurt Google
    Market Realist

    How Huawei’s Trade Blacklist Work-Around Could Hurt Google

    Huawei's new flagship smartphone will launch without Google or Facebook apps preinstalled. However, it's looking for a work-around.

  • Amazon Stock: Price Target, Valuation Compared to Peers
    Market Realist

    Amazon Stock: Price Target, Valuation Compared to Peers

    In September, with geopolitical tensions easing and Amazon stock recovering, perhaps it’s time to review its upside potential and valuation.

  • Waymo eyes deploying self-driving technology in trucking - CEO Krafcik
    Reuters

    Waymo eyes deploying self-driving technology in trucking - CEO Krafcik

    Waymo is exploring deploying its self-driving technology in the trucking industry, CEO John Krafcik said on Thursday, as it works with industry partners to seize a commercial opportunity from a looming shortage of human drivers. Waymo, backed by Alphabet Inc's Google, has so far focused on so-called robotaxis but, in remarks prepared for a speech to the Frankfurt motor show, Krafcik said the self-driving technology, Waymo Driver, was also suited to steering road freight.

  • Waymo eyes deploying self-driving technology in trucking: CEO Krafcik
    Reuters

    Waymo eyes deploying self-driving technology in trucking: CEO Krafcik

    Waymo is exploring deploying its self-driving technology in the trucking industry, CEO John Krafcik said on Thursday, as it works with industry partners to seize a commercial opportunity from a looming shortage of human drivers. Waymo, backed by Alphabet Inc's Google, has so far focused on so-called robotaxis but, in remarks prepared for a speech to the Frankfurt motor show, Krafcik said the self-driving technology, Waymo Driver, was also suited to steering road freight.

  • Google wins legal battle with German publishers over fee demands
    Reuters

    Google wins legal battle with German publishers over fee demands

    BRUSSELS/BERLIN (Reuters) - Google won a legal battle on Thursday after Europe's top court said publishers in Germany could not demand copyright fees since 2013 from the tech firm because the European Commission had not been notified of the German regulation. The group of publishers previously said they were demanding as much as 1 billion euros (892.42 million pounds) from Google-owner Alphabet in copyright fees for their news snippets and other items published by the U.S. company on the Web. The German case underlines the battle waged by publishers seeking a share of revenues earned from the distribution of news on Alphabet services such as Google News and YouTube.

  • Advertising executives point to five ways Google stifles business
    Reuters

    Advertising executives point to five ways Google stifles business

    SAN FRANCISCO/NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. authorities investigating Alphabet Inc's Google for anticompetitive behavior have recently begun probing the company's $116 billion-a-year (94 billion pounds) advertising business. Google disputes its dominance. "Ad tech is a very crowded field, and Google competes with hundreds of companies, including household names like Adobe, Amazon, AT&T, Comcast, News Corp and Verizon," company spokesman Josh Zeitz said.

  • Explainer: Advertising executives point to five ways Google stifles business
    Reuters

    Explainer: Advertising executives point to five ways Google stifles business

    SAN FRANCISCO/NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. authorities investigating Alphabet Inc's Google for anticompetitive behavior have recently begun probing the company's $116 billion-a-year advertising business. Google disputes its dominance. "Ad tech is a very crowded field, and Google competes with hundreds of companies, including household names like Adobe, Amazon, AT&T, Comcast, News Corp and Verizon," company spokesman Josh Zeitz said.

  • U.S. social media firms to testify on violent, extremist online content
    Reuters

    U.S. social media firms to testify on violent, extremist online content

    Alphabet Inc's Google, Facebook Inc and Twitter Inc will testify next week before a U.S. Senate panel on efforts by social media firms to remove violent content from online platforms, the panel said in a statement on Wednesday. The Sept. 18 hearing of the Senate Commerce Committee follows growing concern in Congress about the use of social media by people committing mass shootings and other violent acts. The hearing "will examine the proliferation of extremism online and explore the effectiveness of industry efforts to remove violent content from online platforms.

  • Google to Pay $1.1 Billion in French Tax Investigation Settlement
    Bloomberg

    Google to Pay $1.1 Billion in French Tax Investigation Settlement

    Sep.12 -- Google will pay $1.1 billion to end two French fiscal cases following years of outrage over the amount of tax it pays in Europe. Bloomberg's Tony Aarons reports on "Bloomberg Markets."

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