ABF.L - Associated British Foods plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
2,206.00
-16.00 (-0.72%)
At close: 4:37PM BST
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Previous close2,222.00
Open2,241.00
Bid2,206.00 x 0
Ask2,207.00 x 0
Day's range2,198.00 - 2,250.00
52-week range2,011.00 - 2,659.00
Volume680,611
Avg. volume1,097,681
Market cap17.464B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.17
PE ratio (TTM)19.05
EPS (TTM)115.80
Earnings date5 Nov 2019
Forward dividend & yield0.45 (2.04%)
Ex-dividend date2019-06-06
1y target est2,786.87
  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Reckitt hires Ahold's Carr to take over as CFO in 2020

    Reckitt Benckiser named Ahold Delhaize finance chief Jeff Carr as successor to Adrian Hennah, who is retiring as CFO of the British consumer goods company next year. The maker of Durex condoms and Lysol disinfectant said on Monday that Carr, who has been finance chief at Dutch-American supermarket operator Ahold since 2011, would bring "extensive experience across consumer and retail companies". The appointment of Carr, who worked for Reckitt between 1994 and 2004, is its second big management change this year after replacing long-time chief executive Rakesh Kapoor with PepsiCo executive Laxman Narasimhan as CEO.

  • 3 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy in an ISA and hold forever
    Fool.co.uk

    3 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy in an ISA and hold forever

    G A Chester discusses the special qualities of three FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) stocks he'd buy and hold for a very, very long time.

  • U.K. Shoppers Will Win This Christmas
    Bloomberg

    U.K. Shoppers Will Win This Christmas

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- British retailers begging Santa for a Brexit deal for Christmas may be getting what they asked for.The crucial holiday shopping period, which accounts for a large proportion of their annual profit, is always nail-biting for store chains. This year, it is inextricably linked to Britain’s departure from the European Union.With a Brexit divorce deal in hand, fears of a no-deal split have receded. Crashing out on Oct. 31 would have been disastrous. By contrast, a deal – assuming it gets through the U.K. parliament – has the potential to bring a feel-good factor for retailers. It could unleash some pent up demand, particularly for big ticket items, such as fitted kitchens and sofas. Consumers have held back from splurging on such things, even though wage growth has been outpacing inflation. Demand has already picked up this month, thanks largely to colder weather compared with a year ago. That may bode well.But, there’s still plenty of uncertainly that could weigh down the festivities, including the possibility of the current deal collapsing, a referendum to confirm it or a general election being hastily called. For the past couple of years, consumers’ anxiety over Brexit hasn’t been at a constant level. It has ebbed and flowed with the sense of crisis in government.In September, the volatility was so extreme that some retailers could even predict their sales based on that day’s headlines. The collapse of Thomas Cook, another jolt to the consumer sector, didn’t help either. Any election campaigning on crucial shopping days would be equally distracting, particularly for affluent Britons fearful of a Labour government led by Jeremy Corbyn. But all year the British high street has been battling cautious consumers, as well as the rise of online shopping. Even internet-based retailer Asos Plc has been hurt by nimbler rivals.Whatever happens with Brexit, the prime holiday shopping period will fall late. Christmas is on a Wednesday this year, providing a full extra weekend in December to shop ahead of the holiday.Black Friday, the crazy U.S. shopping tradition that’s taken the world by storm, is at the end of November, a week later than in 2018. Over the past five years, the price-slashing event has sucked forward about 2 billion pounds ($2.6 billion) of spending from December into November, according to Richard Hyman, the independent retail analyst. It is always hard for stores that have discounted over the Black Friday weekend to return to full price for Christmas. This year’s timing makes it virtually impossible. Even if demand isn’t disrupted by another Brexit hiatus or an election, there is the potential for discounts running from the end of November through to the holiday. It’s going to be hard for chains to hold their nerve.Brexit means forecasting Christmas sales is even more difficult than usual. But Hyman estimates that non-food sales will fall by 1%, while food sales will be flat, both a deceleration from last year. If he’s right, it would be the first drop December non-food sales since the referendum. Given that the level of discounting is likely to be intense wherever sales land, they are likely to be less profitable.Amid this environment, what is certain is that the discount sector will do well, in food and fashion. The U.K. arms of the German discounters Aldi and Lidl are making efforts once more to prevent customers defecting to one of the big British supermarkets for their main holiday shopping. Upmarket and vegan food products will be a particular feature of their festive offering. Associated British Foods Plc’s Primark, which has been elevating its gift selection and party dresses over the past few years, should also do well.Mid-market chains, such as Marks & Spencer Group Plc could find life tougher, even as some of their competitors are weakened. The privately owned John Lewis Partnership is preparing for even its more financially comfortable customers to be cautious, with plenty of gifts under 20 pounds such as Fever-Tree gin &tonic Christmas crackers and so-called experiences, such as personal shopping and spa days. Although they are more expensive, at about 100 pounds, consumers may feel they are getting more for their money than when they buy traditional gifts.And even if Christmas does turn out to be better than expected – because a Brexit deal has been struck and an election delayed until 2020 — that doesn’t mean plain sailing from now on.  The political wrangling is far from over. What’s more, three years of uncertainty have taken their toll on business investment. Britain shed jobs over the summer for the first time in two years. And let’s not forget any impact from a global slowdown in 2020. Consumers make the most drastic changes to their spending when they are made redundant or they see friends leaving the workforce.British retailers should extend their Christmas wish list to what happens in the New Year too.\--With assistance from Therese Raphael.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • No savings at 40? I’d start by buying these 2 FTSE 100 shares inside a Stocks and Shares ISA
    Fool.co.uk

    No savings at 40? I’d start by buying these 2 FTSE 100 shares inside a Stocks and Shares ISA

    I think that these two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could produce high returns over the long run.

  • Have £3,000 to invest? Here’s a FTSE 100 dividend stock I consider a bargain after recent selling activity
    Fool.co.uk

    Have £3,000 to invest? Here’s a FTSE 100 dividend stock I consider a bargain after recent selling activity

    Family ownership and a leading position in two strong markets are key reasons why investors should be interested in this FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) stock says Rupert Hargreaves.

  • 3 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy for 2020
    Fool.co.uk

    3 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy for 2020

    These FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE UKX) firms could be profitable buys for uncertain times, says Roland Head.

  • Did Associated British Foods plc (LON:ABF) Insiders Buy Up More Shares?
    Simply Wall St.

    Did Associated British Foods plc (LON:ABF) Insiders Buy Up More Shares?

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. On the other hand, we'd be...

  • How secure is the Associated British Foods dividend (LON:ABF)?
    Stockopedia

    How secure is the Associated British Foods dividend (LON:ABF)?

    There is some evidence that buying progressive dividend payers with solid balance sheets is a strategy well-rewarded by the market. After all, who doesn’t like8230;

  • Eyes on U.S. prize, Primark considers Central American suppliers
    Reuters

    Eyes on U.S. prize, Primark considers Central American suppliers

    Confident it can crack the $300 billion U.S. clothing and shoes market where many other foreign retailers have failed, Britain's Primark is ready to raise its bet on the country by securing new sources of fast fashion in central America. Primark, whose trendy clothes at rock-bottom prices have taken UK shoppers by storm, opened in Boston in 2015 and now has nine stores in the northeast, all served by a warehouse in Pennsylvania that could still serve three times as many stores. It has invested 250 million pounds ($313 million) in the United States, achieved a critical mass of sales and has a four-year education under its belt on a crowded market that is battling to stay afloat in the face of rapid e-commerce growth.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    RPT-Eyes on U.S. prize, Primark considers Central American suppliers

    * Owner AB Foods has fine-tuned Primark model in U.S. * Is confident Primark will be a winner in U.S. LONDON, Sept 23 (Reuters) - Confident it can crack the $300 billion U.S. clothing and shoes market where many other foreign retailers have failed, Britain's Primark is ready to raise its bet on the country by securing new sources of fast fashion in central America.

  • The Associated British Foods share price (LON:ABF) at 2,239p: further downside risk?
    Stockopedia

    The Associated British Foods share price (LON:ABF) at 2,239p: further downside risk?

    Momentum is sticky and persists for longer than investors tend to anticipate. The downside of this is that stocks with recent negative momentum are likely to c8230;

  • Why I’d shun the Thomas Cook share price, and pile into this dynamic FTSE 100 stock
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I’d shun the Thomas Cook share price, and pile into this dynamic FTSE 100 stock

    Roland Head explains why he thinks this FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) firm should be a more profitable buy than Thomas Cook Group plc (LON: TCG).

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Germany: Epicentre of European manufacturing downturn

    * European shares slightly higher * STOXX 600 +0.1% hovers around 5-week highs, DAX +0.3% * Asia stocks edge up on stimulus hopes * Air France top STOXX loser, airlines slide Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Danilo Masoni. Reach him on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: rm://danilo.masoni.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net GERMANY: EPICENTRE OF EUROPEAN MANUFACTURING DOWNTURN (1008 GMT) The recent downturn in the euro-zone factory activity shows diverging signals with Germany sharply underperforming the rest. Germany makes up about one third of the euro area economy and the bloc's manufacturing has historically been highly-correlated with the performance of Europe's No.1 economy.

  • What to Watch: Primark's warning on Brexit costs, Lloyds' PPI hit, and recession fears ease
    Yahoo Finance UK

    What to Watch: Primark's warning on Brexit costs, Lloyds' PPI hit, and recession fears ease

    A daily overview of the top business, market, and economic stories to watch in the UK, Europe, and abroad.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 3-AB Foods expects reduced Primark margins in 2019-20

    Associated British Foods warned on Monday that profit margins at its Primark fashion business will fall in its new financial year as a weaker pound pushes up import costs. Shares in the group, which generates about half of its revenue and profit from Primark, were down 3.6% at 0836 GMT, paring gains for the year so far to 11%. AB Foods kept its overall group guidance for the year to Sept. 14 2019, with Primark's margins increasing.

  • AB Foods expects reduced Primark margins in 2019-20
    Reuters

    AB Foods expects reduced Primark margins in 2019-20

    Associated British Foods warned on Monday that profit margins at its Primark fashion business will fall in its new financial year as a weaker pound pushes up import costs. Shares in the group, which generates about half of its revenue and profit from Primark, were down 3.6% at 0836 GMT, paring gains for the year so far to 11%. AB Foods kept its overall group guidance for the year to Sept. 14 2019, with Primark's margins increasing.

  • The Associated British Foods (LON:ABF) Share Price Is Down 27% So Some Shareholders Are Getting Worried
    Simply Wall St.

    The Associated British Foods (LON:ABF) Share Price Is Down 27% So Some Shareholders Are Getting Worried

    As an investor its worth striving to ensure your overall portfolio beats the market average. But if you try your hand...

  • 3 FTSE 100 stocks I think are worth watching in September
    Fool.co.uk

    3 FTSE 100 stocks I think are worth watching in September

    With consumer confidence likely to be shaky in the run-up to our EU exit, Paul Summers takes a look at three retailing giants reporting next month.

  • Forget a Cash ISA! I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 growth-and-income shares
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget a Cash ISA! I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 growth-and-income shares

    G A Chester highlights two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) dividend stocks he thinks have strong growth and income appeal.

  • Have £1,000 to invest in the FTSE 100? Here are 2 growth shares I’d buy in an ISA right now
    Fool.co.uk

    Have £1,000 to invest in the FTSE 100? Here are 2 growth shares I’d buy in an ISA right now

    I think these two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) stocks could produce impressive capital growth in the long run.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Will Draghi pull a colony of rabbits off his hat?

    Looks like ECB chief Mario Draghi will have to deliver it this time with July minutes reassuring a package was coming and expectations running high from research houses at big banks predicting significant easing in September. In July, markets rallied on Draghi's dovish stance but pulled back sharply after his conference, when he said a rate cut was not discussed during that monetary policy meeting.

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