ADDDF - adidas AG

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed price. Currency in USD
304.74
-4.26 (-1.38%)
At close: 3:57PM EST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close309.00
Open308.00
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range302.00 - 308.00
52-week range201.55 - 329.56
Volume249
Avg. volume234
Market cap60.079B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.68
PE ratio (TTM)34.21
EPS (TTM)8.91
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield3.76 (1.22%)
Ex-dividend date2019-05-10
1y target est267.12
  • Does adidas AG's (ETR:ADS) CEO Salary Reflect Performance?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does adidas AG's (ETR:ADS) CEO Salary Reflect Performance?

    Kasper Rorsted became the CEO of adidas AG (ETR:ADS) in 2016. This analysis aims first to contrast CEO compensation...

  • Watch for Sparks as Jet Engines Hit Their Limits
    Bloomberg

    Watch for Sparks as Jet Engines Hit Their Limits

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Earlier this week, my Bloomberg Opinion colleague Chris Bryant examined the ongoing troubles for advanced jet engines used on today’s commercial airliners. These engines now seem to be reaching their technical limits, and as Bryant says, we may be asking too much of the technology.That’s not great news for the companies making those turbines, or for those flying the aircraft. It’s also not the best news for the climate, given the trajectory of emissions from air travel and air freight. Carbon dioxide emissions from commercial aviation made up 2.4% of global emissions in 2018 and, according to the International Council on Clean Transportation, have grown 32% in just five years.The geography of those emissions is highly concentrated. Three markets — the U.S., the European Union and China — account for more than half of all emissions; the top 10 emitters contribute more than 70% of the global total.There’s something hopeful, actually, in that geographical distribution. High concentration means that tackling emissions in just three markets can have an outsized impact, and standards set in those large markets are easy for others to follow. There’s another aspect to the distribution of aviation emissions that’s worth examining: emissions by type of aircraft. Bryant writes of problems with engines on both widebody and narrowbody aircraft: the Rolls-Royce Holdings Plc Trent 1000 engines used on the widebody Boeing Co. 787, and United Technologies Corp. subsidiary Pratt & Whitney’s geared turbofan used on the narrowbody Airbus SE A320neo. While widebody aircraft make up one-third of global emissions, narrowbody and regional passenger plans are almost half. If the turbines used to propel the largest and longest-range of aircraft are approaching technical limits but almost half of emissions are from shorter-range and smaller aircraft, then there’s space to innovate, for emissions’ sake, at the short and small end. And that space looks electric and hybrid. Next month, Vancouver-based Harbour Air will fly its first electric seaplane, a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver prototype retrofitted with a propulsion system from Seattle-based electric aviation company MagniX. It’s a first look at what electric commercial flight could be, and as it draws upon a sophisticated, global and continually improving network of battery makers while the cost of batteries continues to decrease, it has room to grow. “Because of airborne mobility development, this technology is unstoppable, and it’s getting more practical as every day goes by,” says Greg McDougall, Harbour Air’s CEO. “The brainpower and money involved is snowballing, and there’s no doubt we can roll out what we’re doing to other small airlines.” It’s an infectious enthusiasm, but it just might take to the air elsewhere, too. Weekend readingThe Qantas Group plans to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2050. Meanwhile, Formula 1 plans to reach that milestone by 2030. Ferrari says its new Roma coupe is inspired by the postwar Eternal City. It’s a bit of a step up from the Vespas and Topolinos of the film “Roman Holiday.” The European Investment Bank will not consider new financing of unabated fossil fuels, including natural gas, after 2021. Sweden’s Riksbank is selling bonds issued by the Canadian province of Alberta and the Australian states of Queensland and Western Australia due to those areas’ large climate impacts. How Australia’s big businesses saw the climate turning point coming. The world’s biggest gun has helped solve a long-standing space mystery: the risk that orbiting microdebris poses to satellites. Weather-tech startup Understory is selling Hail Safe, an insurance product that protects auto dealers from hailstorm damages. Think tank Macro Polo’s deep dive into the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) supply chain in East Asia. Adidas has abandoned its robot factory experiment. Open-source code will survive the apocalypse in an Arctic cave. Silicon Valley’s Singularity University is cutting staff, and its CEO is stepping down.  Elon Musk’s keep-it-in-the-family deal for SolarCity has become the top threat to Tesla Inc.’s future. The new dot-com bubble is here: It’s called online advertising. Designer Iris van Herpen’s work is inspired by the Large Hadron Collider. A fascinating look at how American brands became indelibly Japanese.  In data journalism, technology still matters less than people. The coming age of generative biology. Get Sparklines delivered to your inbox. Sign up here. And subscribe to Bloomberg All Access and get much, much more. You’ll receive our unmatched global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, the Bloomberg Open and the Bloomberg Close.To contact the author of this story: Nathaniel Bullard at nbullard@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Brooke Sample at bsample1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nathaniel Bullard is a BloombergNEF energy analyst, covering technology and business model innovation and system-wide resource transitions.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Adidas to close German, U.S. robot factories
    Reuters

    Adidas to close German, U.S. robot factories

    Adidas plans to close high-tech "robot" factories in Germany and the United States it launched to bring production closer to customers, saying on Monday deploying some of the technology in Asia would be "more economic and flexible". The Adidas factories were part of a drive to meet demand for faster delivery of new styles to its major markets and to counter rising wages in Asia and higher shipping costs. It originally planned a global network of similar factories.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Closing snapshot: Not a bad day

    * Earnings drive top movers Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. European stocks edged higher today as investors found some comfort on a scaling-back of recession bets amid optimism about a China-U.S. trade deal. With this string of not-great but good-enough news, the Euro stocks index hit its highest since February 2018, while European blue chips had their best day in two years with the banking sector enjoying its best session in six months.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Italy, the contrarian 2020 bet?

    * Earnings drive top movers Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. Germany has long been dragging its feet on such a project that included a common deposit insurance scheme and clearly its new stance is a welcome development but, as always, there is a but and, of course, the devil is in the details.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Money for nothing in the age of rage

    * Earnings drive top movers Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. A post by Ray Dalio's Linkedin (find it here: https://bit.ly/2qo3IdR ) is doing the rounds this morning, with the hedge fund billionaire putting his finger on the big debate raging around quantative easing and MMT amid growing global discontent. The theme, as it turns out, has emerged as a central topic in the Reuters Global Investment Outlook Summit.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Ray of hope for Europe: $1 trln flow into ESG funds by 2030

    * Earnings drive top movers Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. Yes, that massive amount of cash is likely to flow into ESG funds as the theme has become mainstream, especially in Europe.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-UK High Street: available at your local large, mid and small cap index

    * Earnings drive top movers Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. It's a rare thing to witness: at one stage this morning, the UK high street theme was top of the FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and the British small cap index.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-It's official: banks no longer Europe's worst

    * Earnings drive top movers Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. It seems that all those brokers calling for investors to come back to the battered banking sector is having an effect! European banks have hit an early May peak this morning and are now up more than 6% year to date, leaving to Telecoms the trophy of worst sectoral performer.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-European shares hold four-year peak, creep towards record highs

    The pan-European STOXX 600 index closed 0.2% higher and was about 2% away from reclaiming its record high level, hit last in April 2015. European shares have logged strong gains this week on growing optimism over a trade truce between the United States and China. "All the good news regarding trade has also been largely priced in, so if the rumors prove to be wrong the risk to the potential downside are actually far bigger," said Simona Gambarini, markets economist at Capital Economics in London.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Reading through Lagarde's poker-face Berlin speech

    Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. Reading through Lagarde's Monday speech in Berlin for policy clues was no easy task, not least because it officially wasn't about monetary policy. For her first official speech, the ex-IMF French chief chose to honour none other than Wolfgang Schaeuble, a monetary hawk who embodies, at least for a good chunk of the European left, Germany's hardcore orthodoxy on all things monetary and fiscal.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-On the radar: UK high street blues, Q3 ups and downs

    Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. One of the most spectacular hit could come from the UK high street. Shares in struggling Norwegian Air will also be closely watched after it managed to raise $272 million.

  • Adidas sees soccer boost after stumble on Kanye West shoes
    Reuters

    Adidas sees soccer boost after stumble on Kanye West shoes

    German sportswear company Adidas expects a boost to sales from new soccer merchandise ahead of the 2020 European championships after quarterly growth was held back by a weaker performance from Yeezy shoes designed by Kanye West. Adidas decided to limit supplies of Yeezy products this year to maintain their exclusivity, Chief Executive Kasper Rorsted told journalists. Shares in Adidas, which have risen by more than a third in the last year, were down 2.9% at 1046 GMT.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    From beer to beauty, sales of vegan products surging with UK consumers fuelling the rise

    From vegan burgers to vegan boots, the market for products using no animal products is surging, with climate-conscious consumers in Britain fuelling the global dash to cash in on a fast- expanding range of ethical merchandise. With the 25th annual World Vegan Month starting on Nov. 1, Britain has overtaken Germany to become the nation with the highest number of new vegan food products launched in a year, according to market research firm Mintel. About 16% of food products launched in 2018 had a vegan claim, up from 8% in 2015, with the sector growing about 30 percent in the year to 740 million pounds ($955 million), the firm said.

  • What Kind Of Shareholder Owns Most adidas AG (ETR:ADS) Stock?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Kind Of Shareholder Owns Most adidas AG (ETR:ADS) Stock?

    The big shareholder groups in adidas AG (ETR:ADS) have power over the company. Institutions will often hold stock in...

  • Sports Direct demands inquiry into Nike-Adidas dominance
    The Guardian

    Sports Direct demands inquiry into Nike-Adidas dominance

    Retailer raises concerns about extremely strong bargaining position of ‘must-have’ brands. Sports Direct, led by leisurewear tycoon Mike Ashley, has called for a Europe-wide investigation into the dominance of Nike and Adidas in the sportswear market. The firm issued a statement in the light of reports that Nike has told independent retailers that it will stop supplying them within two years because their sales methods were “no longer aligned” with the US company’s own strategy. Sports Direct referred to concerns that Adidas would follow suit, stifling access to the goods sold by companies that between them rack up £50bn of revenues a year. “The sports industry has long been dominated by the ‘must-have’ brands such as Adidas,” the company said. “These ‘must-have’ brands hold an extremely strong bargaining position vis-a-vis the retailers within their supply networks and use their market power to implement market wide practices aimed at controlling the supply and, ultimately, the pricing of their products.” It said brands such as Nike and Adidas had sufficient market power to restrict the range of products offered by retailers or refuse supply altogether. “Sports Direct believes that the industry as a whole would benefit from a wide market review by the appropriate authorities in both the UK and Europe,” the company said.

  • We Think adidas (ETR:ADS) Can Manage Its Debt With Ease
    Simply Wall St.

    We Think adidas (ETR:ADS) Can Manage Its Debt With Ease

    David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the...

  • Did You Miss adidas's (ETR:ADS) Whopping 389% Share Price Gain?
    Simply Wall St.

    Did You Miss adidas's (ETR:ADS) Whopping 389% Share Price Gain?

    Buying shares in the best businesses can build meaningful wealth for you and your family. While the best companies are...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-On our radar: trainers, elevators and vacuums

    Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Josephine Mason. On the corporate news front, warnings from industrial machinery makers are piling up. The latest comes from Germany's Pfeiffer Vacuum, which warned of delays to orders, cut its FY sales and EBIT margin forecasts in that move that underscores worries about a prolonged European corporate recession and bodes poorly for the upcoming Q3 earnings season.

  • Motley Fool

    Is Under Armour a Buy?

    The once-turbocharged sports apparel company has fallen on hard times. Could this be an opportunity to pick up the stock at a discount?

  • 5 Reasons Foot Locker Stock Dropped to a 52-Week Low
    Motley Fool

    5 Reasons Foot Locker Stock Dropped to a 52-Week Low

    The bears say the footwear retailer is struggling against first-party retailers like Nike and Adidas.

  • Motley Fool

    A Foolish Take: Apparel and Shoes Top Back-to-School Shopping Lists

    Apparel brands that resonate with teens could benefit from the back-to-school rush.

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