AMD - Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
55.88
-1.38 (-2.40%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close57.26
Open57.54
Bid55.93 x 800
Ask55.99 x 1800
Day's range55.51 - 58.15
52-week range27.43 - 59.27
Volume59,256,318
Avg. volume60,552,620
Market cap65.446B
Beta (5Y monthly)2.13
PE ratio (TTM)131.17
EPS (TTM)0.43
Earnings date28 Jul 2020 - 03 Aug 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date27 Apr 1995
1y target est54.40
  • Why AMD Stock Was Trading Higher Today
    Motley Fool

    Why AMD Stock Was Trading Higher Today

    What happened Shares of semiconductor company Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD) were trading a little higher on Thursday after Bank of America encouraged investors by reiterating its buy rating for the company.

  • Electronics Semiconductors Industry Boasts Bright Prospects
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    Electronics Semiconductors Industry Boasts Bright Prospects

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  • Why NVIDIA Is All Set to Break Out
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    Why NVIDIA Is All Set to Break Out

    Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD) took NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) by storm in the first calendar quarter of 2020, clocking nice market share growth in the discrete graphics cards space thanks to a couple of solid products that were launched last year.

  • Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know

    Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) closed at $50.28 in the latest trading session, marking a +0.36% move from the prior day.

  • Bloomberg

    Apple-Made Computer Chips Coming to Mac, in Split From Intel

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. said it plans to sell Mac computers using processors designed in-house, signaling an end to its 15-year alliance with Intel Corp.The first Macs with the Apple-designed chips will debut by the end of the year, Tim Cook, the chief executive officer, said Monday at the company’s virtual conference for software makers. Apple is also working on models with Intel processors, Cook said.“When we make bold changes, it’s for one simple yet powerful reason: so we can make much better products,” Cook said. “The Mac is transitioning to our own Apple silicon.”The new chips will enable Apple to build computers with improved security and battery life, said Johny Srouji, Apple’s silicon chief. Developers will need to compile versions of their apps compatible with the new products for the software to run smoothly. However, Apple will provide a fall-back to make old apps run on the new system. Microsoft Corp. and Adobe Inc. have already begun updating Office and Photoshop, Apple said.Apple introduced an array of software enhancements to its products at the event Monday. It will make the most drastic changes to the iPhone home screen since the product’s release in 2007, bringing the software more in line with Google’s Android. Users will be able to place widgets that sit between the typical grid of apps, can be set to varying sizes and present information, such as the weather or a calendar, that updates throughout the day. The Apple Watch will get sleep tracking and hand-washing detection tools.The changes to the Mac are the most significant, though. Apple will release a major new version of the Mac operating system, called Big Sur, with support for the new chips. The design looks similar to the iPhone and iPad, with curved app icons, translucency, notification bubbles and the new widgets feature from iOS 14. The Messages and Maps apps will gain many of the features available in their mobile counterparts, and the Safari web browser will get a translation tool, changes to tabbed browsing and a customizable home page. Executives made a point of demonstrating how smoothly these apps run on Apple-designed chips.The partnership between Apple and Intel was formed in 2005, when Steve Jobs outlined a move away from PowerPC processors onstage at the same Apple event series for developers. Intel helped Apple catch up to Windows computers, some of which were more powerful at the time. In tandem, though, Apple was working on more energy-efficient chips for mobile devices based on Arm Ltd. designs and continues to use those to power the iPhone and iPad.In recent years, the speed and power efficiency of Apple’s mobile chips have rapidly increased, while the pace of improvement to Intel’s parts has slowed. This irked Apple executives, who pushed the company’s silicon unit to develop more powerful processors fit for the Mac, people familiar with the matter have said.The split from Intel has been a long time in the making. As far back as 2012, Apple was exploring a switch to its own chips, Bloomberg reported at the time. In 2018, Bloomberg reported that Apple would formally begin the transition away from Intel in 2020.In addition to ensuring legacy software runs well on the new Macs, a challenge for Apple will be to make processors speedy enough to replace Intel chips in its “pro” line of computers. Apple didn’t say Monday which models will get the new chips. Intel shares were about flat in intraday trading, while Apple’s stock was up 2% Monday, surpassing market-wide gains.Intel said in an emailed statement that it will continue to support Apple as a customer. Intel also boasted that its chips are the most advanced and offer the most open platform for software developers.The Mac is no longer the key revenue driver for Apple that it once was, but it safely sells about 20 million unit a year, delivering about $25 billion in revenue. The computers are also key for Apple to retain its professional market, which helps spur purchases of more popular devices like iPhones, AirPods and Apple Watches.For Intel, a break with Apple is more of a symbolic blow than a financial one. The entire Mac laptop lineup represents less than 5% of Intel’s annual revenue, according to an estimate by Stacy Rasgon, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein. The bigger concern is that Apple could embolden other computer makers to make similar moves, he said. “Now you have an actual PC that can run on something that’s not Intel.”Intel, the world’s largest chipmaker, has shrugged off attempts to unseat its dominance of personal computing for decades. Its only direct rival today is Advanced Micro Devices Inc., which has produced newer processors that have begun to take share over the last two years. But AMD’s revenue is still less than 10% of that of Intel.Other efforts to break Intel’s lucrative grip on computer processors haven’t made much of a dent. Microsoft Corp. has a version of Windows that works with chips made by Qualcomm Inc. PC makers, including Microsoft itself, have made laptops based on that combination. Those products are praised for their battery life but haven’t grabbed significant market share. The Qualcomm processors are based on the Arm technology that Apple uses in its semiconductors.While Intel’s grip on the market is largely intact and its earnings continue to grow, analysts have seen signs of slippagge. Most of that stems from persistent delays in introducing new production techniques. Once the leader in the crucial means of making processors faster and more efficient, Intel now trails Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., the producer of all Apple-designed chips.Those slip-ups may have accelerated Apple’s departure from Intel, said Matt Ramsay, an analyst at Cowen & Co. Apple is a technology leader partly because of its control over both the software and hardware and its willingness to replace suppliers when it spots a vulnerability or an advantage elsewhere. “Their reputation with suppliers is of being somewhat ruthless,” said Ramsay. “It looks like another consequence of Intel’s execution challenges.”(Updates with more details starting in the fifth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Semiconductors and AMD Close To A Breakout Move
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    Semiconductors and AMD Close To A Breakout Move

    Let me teach you about two price patterns that are currently setting up in Advanced Micro Devices (AMD).

  • Intel's (INTC) New Offerings Aim to Accelerate AI Workloads
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    Intel's (INTC) New Offerings Aim to Accelerate AI Workloads

    Intel (INTC) introduces third generation Xeon Scalable processors and other product enhancements, powers AI focused portfolio.

  • Estimating The Fair Value Of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMD)
    Simply Wall St.

    Estimating The Fair Value Of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMD)

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMD) by...

  • AMD Unveils Refreshed Ryzen PC Chips
    Motley Fool

    AMD Unveils Refreshed Ryzen PC Chips

    Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD) rolled out its third-generation Ryzen desktop PC processors in July 2019. The chips offered compelling value propositions, providing more cores for less money than comparable products from Intel (NASDAQ: INTC).

  • Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
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    Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) closed the most recent trading day at $54.46, moving -0.4% from the previous trading session.

  • AMD's New Radeon Pro GPUs to Boost MacBook Pro Performance
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    AMD's New Radeon Pro GPUs to Boost MacBook Pro Performance

    AMD's new Pro 5600M Mobile GPU, customized for 16-inch MacBook Pro laptops, comes with robust features designed to support a diverse range of complex workloads.

  • AMD Takes NVIDIA by Storm, but Can It Keep Up the Pace?
    Motley Fool

    AMD Takes NVIDIA by Storm, but Can It Keep Up the Pace?

    Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ: AMD) has been chipping away at arch-rival NVIDIA's (NASDAQ: NVDA) discrete graphics card market share for a few years now, and did it once again in the first quarter of 2020, according to the latest numbers from Jon Peddie Research. Jon Peddie Research's latest discrete graphics processing unit (GPU) report reveals that AMD was sitting on nearly 31% of the market in the first quarter of 2020.

  • Intel Loses a Chip Wizard at the Worst Possible Time
    Bloomberg

    Intel Loses a Chip Wizard at the Worst Possible Time

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- What was already a tough week for Intel Corp. got worse Thursday night: One of the chip giant’s most essential employees left the building.Intel announced top chip architect Jim Keller resigned effective immediately for personal reasons after only two years on the job. The company didn’t specify exactly why but added the executive would serve as a consultant for six months to help with the leadership transition.Keller’s departure is a big deal. No one else in the semiconductor industry has his pedigree of chip-engineering success over the last two decades. In the late 1990s, he designed Digital Equipment’s Alpha chip, which was the fastest in the world at the time. Then, after stints as lead chip architect at Advanced Micro Devices Inc. and PA Semi, he led the team at Apple Inc. that created the A4 and A5 mobile processors, which were instrumental to the success of the early iPhones. After Apple, he returned to AMD and helped design the Zen microarchitecture, laying the groundwork for the company’s turnaround. And prior to joining Intel in 2018, the executive was the head of Tesla Inc.’s Autopilot efforts.The surprising resignation came after other momentous news for Intel earlier this week. On Tuesday, Bloomberg News reported that Apple was on the verge of announcing plans to use its own chips over Intel’s in Macs starting next year. That day I wrote about how Apple’s move would have multiple negative ramifications for Intel’s chip business. But the Keller announcement may be even more worrisome for Intel’s long -term future.When Keller arrived at Intel, his reputation reassured investors that the chipmaker would improve upon its lackluster technology execution in recent years. The vertically integrated company, which manufactures and designs its own chips, had fallen behind on both fronts. First, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. surpassed Intel in its capabilities to manufacture chips at smaller, more advanced semiconductor processes. Second, AMD’s latest chip designs have proven to offer better performance, along with lower energy consumption, spurring the beginning of market-share losses for Intel. According to Mercury Research, AMD has wrested nearly 2 percentage points of desktop PC processor share from Intel over the last year.In another sign of the sea change in technical prowess, last month Nvidia Corp. decided to choose an AMD server processor for its latest artificial intelligence computer. It marked the first time Nvidia didn’t choose Intel for its AI system, and it is especially noteworthy because AMD is Nvidia’s primary competitor in the graphics semiconductor space. Nvidia said it went with AMD because of its better performance.The next few years will be critical as chipmakers jockey for position in dynamic markets from cloud computing to AI, autonomous cars to visual graphics computing. With Intel’s current lineup falling behind, Keller’s resignation couldn’t come at a worse time.Industry analysts say it takes about four years for a chip architect to truly make its mark on a product pipeline. That makes Keller’s short tenure particularly problematic. Intel needed his experienced hand to guide the final stages of development for its next generation of chips. It simply can’t afford to lose him now.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tae Kim is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Barron's, following an earlier career as an equity analyst.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Intel Says Top Chip Designer Resigns for Personal Reasons

    (Bloomberg) -- Intel Corp. said top chip designer Jim Keller has resigned for personal reasons, dealing a blow to the world’s biggest semiconductor maker as it tries to reassert its industry leadership.Keller’s resignation is effective immediately but he will act as a consultant for the company for six months, Intel said Thursday in a statement.Keller was a senior vice president and general manager of silicon engineering. The former executive at Apple Inc., Tesla Inc. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. is credited with leading programs that have produced some of the most important components in the industry’s history.While Intel continues to report record sales, its rivals claim their products are now equal or better in performance and that Intel’s manufacturing delays make it more vulnerable to competition than it has been in years. At the same time, customers such as Amazon.com Inc. are increasingly designing their own processors.“Keller’s departure is a big deal and suggests that whatever he was implementing at Intel was not working or the old Intel guard did not want to implement it,” Hans Mosesmann, an analyst at Rosenblatt Securities, wrote in a note to investors. “The net of this situation for us is that Intel’s processor and process node roadmaps are going to be more in flux or broken than even we had expected.”Intel said its technology group, led by Murthy Renduchintala, the company’s chief engineering officer, promoted four engineers to more senior roles.Keller was a senior executive at PA Semi, which was later acquired by Apple to boost its in-house component efforts. He designed some of Apple’s earliest in-house iPhone and iPad chips, which are the main custom components in its best-selling devices.(Updates with analyst comment in fifth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Intel (INTC) to Drive PC Innovation With New Lakeview Chips
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    Intel (INTC) to Drive PC Innovation With New Lakeview Chips

    Intel's (INTC) new Lakeview processors feature enhanced graphics and smaller size, which makes them ideal for next-gen foldable and dual screen devices.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Intel, Advanced Micro Devices and Taiwan Semiconductor
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    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Intel, Advanced Micro Devices and Taiwan Semiconductor

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Intel, Advanced Micro Devices and Taiwan Semiconductor

  • Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know
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    Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) closed at $57.44, marking a +1.86% move from the previous day.

  • Can Apple Chips Hurt Intel?
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    Can Apple Chips Hurt Intel?

    Apple is not such a big customer and it may not shift away entirely.

  • AMD Hits Buy Points
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    AMD Hits Buy Points

    AMD moved above a 58.73 cup-with-handle buy point briefly, but could close above it. It's did close above a 57.08 entry. Arguably Tuesday's move was actionable.

  • Apple’s Mac Chip Switch Is Double Trouble for Intel
    Bloomberg

    Apple’s Mac Chip Switch Is Double Trouble for Intel

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It’s finally going to happen. Apple Inc. is on the verge of using its own chips over Intel Corp.’s for its Mac computers.Bloomberg News reported Tuesday that Apple is preparing to announce as soon as this month that it will use its own processors in Macs starting next year. The new Macs will incorporate the same internally-developed semiconductors, based on Arm Ltd. chip-architecture technology, that powers the iPhone. According to Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman, Apple plans to move its entire Mac product lineup to its own chips because of their higher performance and improved power efficiency.The move will have multiple negative ramifications for Intel’s chip business. The most obvious is the direct impact of losing revenue as the sole processor supplier for Apple’s PC line. The Mac currently represents 12% of the U.S. PC market based on units sold, according to the latest Gartner data. And Bernstein estimates Apple’s laptop line accounts for 2% to 4% of Intel’s sales and mid- to high-single digit percentage of its earnings. Apple also will be able to leverage Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Ltd.’s better chip-making technology going forward. Apple uses the Taiwan-based foundry to manufacture its chip designs. In recent years, TSMC has moved ahead of Intel in its ability to fabricate chips at smaller, more advanced chip nodes.  At first blush, the financial losses for Intel seem manageable. However, there are second-order effects that may prove more worrisome. First, if Apple is able to make better-performing and more power-efficient chips — an ability it has proven capable of in the smartphone market — then Arm-based Macs may be able to gain a larger share of the PC market on the back of its differentiated features. Further out, Apple’s move may pose a serious threat to Intel’s crown jewel server chip business. Here’s how.Currently, Intel dominates the high-profit-margin data-center business, where it sells server chips to cloud-computing providers and corporations. The segment generated sales of $23.5 billion for Intel in 2019, with operating profit of $10.2 billion. And according to IDC, the chip maker held 93% of the worldwide server processor market based on sales last year, versus Advanced Micro Devices Inc.’s 5% share.While Intel has long been able to maintain its strong market position in the server space, the arrival of Arm-based Macs may change the game. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, has long said the main reason Arm chips have struggled to gain traction in servers was because there weren’t any Arm-based PC platforms at critical mass. He cited the importance of developers being able to iterate and test their server code on local machines. There have been Arm-based Windows laptops on the market, but they generally have not sold well. Now, though, with Mac shifting to Arm-based chips, developers will have tens of millions of Arm-based machines at their finger tips, offering a thriving ecosystem for the up-and-coming chip architecture. Yes, it will take some time for Apple’s move to impact the market. Intel is currently enjoying strong demand as employees are forced to buy more computer hardware to outfit their remote-working home offices, on top of surging cloud-computing demand for its chips as internet services usage rises in the Covid-19 world. And applications must be ported to work well on Apple’s Arm-based chip architecture.But in coming years, Intel’s key businesses will be threatened by Apple’s move. The step is an important one and will likely prove to be a turning point for the chip industry.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tae Kim is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Barron's, following an earlier career as an equity analyst.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • AMD's Second-Gen EPYC Processors to Power New NVIDIA System
    Zacks

    AMD's Second-Gen EPYC Processors to Power New NVIDIA System

    AMD's latest EPYC processors will help NVIDIA in delivering high-performance computing capabilities to its customers to support diverse AI workloads.

  • Apple Plans to Announce Move to Its Own Mac Chips at WWDC
    Bloomberg

    Apple Plans to Announce Move to Its Own Mac Chips at WWDC

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. is preparing to announce a shift to its own main processors in Mac computers, replacing chips from Intel Corp., as early as this month at its annual developer conference, according to people familiar with the plans.The company is holding WWDC the week of June 22. Unveiling the initiative, codenamed Kalamata, at the event would give outside developers time to adjust before new Macs roll out in 2021, the people said. Since the hardware transition is still months away, the timing of the announcement could change, they added, while asking not to be identified discussing private plans.The new processors will be based on the same technology used in Apple-designed iPhone and iPad chips. However, future Macs will still run the macOS operating system rather than the iOS software on mobile devices from the company. Bloomberg News reported on Apple’s effort to move away from Intel earlier this year, and in 2018. Apple shares were up less than 1% Tuesday while Intel was down less than 1%.Apple is using technology licensed from Arm Ltd., part of Japanese tech conglomerate SoftBank Group Corp. This architecture is different from the underlying technology in Intel chips, so developers will need time to optimize their software for the new components. Cupertino, California-based Apple and Santa Clara-based Intel declined to comment.This will be the first time in the 36-year history of the Mac that Apple-designed processors will power these machines. It has changed chips only two other times. In the early 1990s, Apple switched from Motorola processors to PowerPC. At WWDC in 2005, Steve Jobs announced a move from PowerPC to Intel, and Apple rolled out those first Intel-based Macs in January 2006. Like it did then, the company plans to eventually transition the entire Mac lineup to its Arm-based processors, including the priciest desktop computers, the people said.Read more: Apple Aims to Sell Macs With Its Own Chips Starting in 2021Apple has about 10% of the PC market, so the change may not cut into Intel sales much. However, Macs are considered premium products. So if the company moves away from Intel for performance reasons it may prompt other PC makers to look at different options, too. Microsoft Corp., Samsung Electronics Co. and Lenovo Group Ltd. have already debuted laptops that run on Arm-based chips.Apple’s chip-development group, led by Johny Srouji, decided to make the switch after Intel’s annual chip performance gains slowed. Apple engineers worried that sticking to Intel’s road map would delay or derail some future Macs, according to people familiar with the effort.Inside Apple, tests of new Macs with the Arm-based chips have shown sizable improvements over Intel-powered versions, specifically in graphics performance and apps using artificial intelligence, the people said. Apple’s processors are also more power-efficient than Intel’s, which may mean thinner and lighter Mac laptops in the future.Apple’s move would be a highlight of this year’s WWDC, which will be held online due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Because of the fluid nature of the global health crisis and its impact on Apple’s product development, the timing of the chip announcement could change.At the conference, Apple is also readying updates to its other operating systems -- iOS, iPadOS, tvOS and watchOS -- with changes to augmented-reality capabilities, deeper integration with outside apps and services, and improved Apple Watch fitness features. A big priority is improving the performance of its mobile software after last year’s release, iOS 13, suffered from several issues.The company is working on at least three of its own Mac processors, known as systems-on-a-chip, with the first based on the A14 processor in the next iPhone. In addition to the main central processing unit, there will be a graphics processing unit and a Neural Engine for handling machine learning, a popular and powerful type of AI, the people said. In the past, Apple has made chips for specific Mac functions, such as security.Read more about Apple’s upcoming Mac chips here.Intel has faced more competition as its lead in production technology -- a key way to improve semiconductor performance -- has slipped. Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. makes processors for many of Intel’s rivals using a more advanced process.TSMC will build the new Mac processors using a 5-nanometer production technique -- the same approach as for the next iPhones and iPad Pros. Intel rivals Qualcomm Inc. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. also use TSMC to make their chips.The Apple chip project has been in the works for several years and is considered one of the company’s most secretive efforts. In 2018, Apple successfully developed a Mac chip based on the iPad Pro’s processor for internal testing, giving the company confidence it could announce such a shift this year.(Updates shares in third paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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