AMG.DE - Amgen Inc.

XETRA - XETRA Delayed price. Currency in EUR
198.50
+3.42 (+1.75%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
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Previous close195.08
Open202.05
Bid197.86 x 20000
Ask198.54 x 9000
Day's range197.54 - 203.50
52-week range148.00 - 221.40
Volume870
Avg. volume3,117
Market cap120.327B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.90
PE ratio (TTM)15.41
EPS (TTM)12.88
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield5.73 (2.94%)
Ex-dividend date15 May 2020
1y target estN/A
  • Biotech Stock Roundup: AMGN & INCY Focus on Coronavirus Treatments, & More
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    Biotech Stock Roundup: AMGN & INCY Focus on Coronavirus Treatments, & More

    The biotech sector is in focus with pipeline updates from companies evaluating treatments for the novel COVID-19.

  • Pharma Coronavirus Efforts Continue, Amgen & Incyte Join In
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    Pharma Coronavirus Efforts Continue, Amgen & Incyte Join In

    Amgen (AMGN) signs a deal with Adaptive Biotechnologies to discover antibodies to prevent/treat COVID-19. Incyte/Novartis (NVS) plan to initiate study on Jakafi for COVID-19- associated cytokine storm.

  • U.S. Should Buy Coronavirus Vaccines Before They’re Invented
    Bloomberg

    U.S. Should Buy Coronavirus Vaccines Before They’re Invented

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The $8.3 billion spending bill that President Donald Trump signed last week to address the coronavirus crisis contains a provision that could be costly: When a vaccine for the virus becomes available, the law says, the government can spend no more than a “fair and reasonable” price for it. But it does not require the drugmaker to accept such a payment.The law includes a pricing mechanism, but it relies in part on comparisons with other vaccine prices, and these vary widely: Medicare reimburses about $56 for Sanofi’s influenza vaccine, $500 per course for Merck’s human papilloma vaccine, and $5,000 per injection for Amgen’s melanoma vaccine.Inevitably, then, when an effective, desperately needed vaccine is ready, we can expect a pricing standoff. To avoid this, the government should buy vaccines now, even before they’re invented. This would guarantee a good price for the government, and it would benefit drugmakers by ensuring a market for their products. Our government routinely procures items that are not yet designed and built. Engines for fighter jets are purchased when they are sketches on paper, as are federal office buildings. Vaccines needed for the developing world are sometimes pre-purchased through advanced market commitments. In all cases the contracts specify minimum requirements for the ultimate product.It’s easy to imagine the profile for a Covid-19 vaccine. First, it would need to be effective enough to curtail spread. Early vaccines rarely work on everyone, but even modest effectiveness would provide large benefits to public health. And while the immunity conferred by a vaccine can wane, what’s needed most immediately is near-term protection. Expected side effects should be rare, and monitoring for severe ones should be required.We would also need this vaccine to be produced at population scale within a year. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has said this is a scientifically achievable timeline. Production, distribution, outreach and delivery would all be part of a staged contract.Using these specifications, the government would solicit bids, and each responding vaccine developer would propose the price it would charge for developing and delivering a vaccine, either alone or with partners. Because any one vaccine is unlikely to be perfect or perfectly supplied, we should select three or more winners.The alternative is to wait for the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to develop a vaccine on its own, relying on existing market mechanisms to protect against the usual risks of drug development. The first of these is the risk inherent in investing money and time on a drug that may turn out not to be effective. Vaccine science mitigates this threat. The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations has already developed eight promising vaccine candidates against Covid-19. And 25 companies are ready to work on a vaccine.The second uncertainty is whether there will turn out to be a market for the products that drugmakers create. The government contract approach we propose mitigates that possibility. Both of us know from experience the problems that arise when unaffordability keeps an essential medical treatment out of reach. We helped develop the subscription model that Louisiana and the state of Washington use to finance expensive drugs to treat hepatitis C: The states pay a flat fee in return for as many courses of treatment as they need.The federal government could follow a similar “Netflix financing” model to pay a single price to vaccinate the population against the coronavirus.We don’t know how much such a contract will cost. But asking for bids will lead companies to put forward their best prices. The winners will make money (including by selling their vaccines overseas) while showing off their scientific prowess and the important role they play in public health. And the federal government can make sure everyone in the U.S. is protected against Covid-19.To contact the authors of this story: Peter B. Bach at info@drugpricinglab.orgMark Trusheim at trusheim@mit.eduTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mary Duenwald at mduenwald@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Peter B. Bach, a physician, directs the Drug Pricing Lab at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Mark Trusheim is a visiting scientist at the MIT Sloan School of Management. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Amgen (AMGN) Truly One of the Best Biotech Stocks to Own?
    Zacks

    Is Amgen (AMGN) Truly One of the Best Biotech Stocks to Own?

    Amgen (AMGN) boasts a strong biosimilars portfolio, which can drive long-term growth. Amgen is also progressing with its pipeline while regularly pursuing business development deals.

  • Why Is Amgen (AMGN) Down 11.7% Since Last Earnings Report?
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    Why Is Amgen (AMGN) Down 11.7% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Amgen (AMGN) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • New bill aims to protect medical product supply chain amid coronavirus outbreak
    Yahoo Finance

    New bill aims to protect medical product supply chain amid coronavirus outbreak

    A new bill aims to protect the medical product supply chain as the coronavirus continues to spread.

  • Coronavirus outbreak begins to disrupt booming China drug trials
    Reuters

    Coronavirus outbreak begins to disrupt booming China drug trials

    The U.S. clinical trials database lists nearly 500 studies with a site in the city of Wuhan, which has endured the brunt of an outbreak that has killed more than 1,100 people and infected more than 44,000 in China. About 20% of global trials are now conducted in China, up from about 10% just five years ago, according to GlobalData Plc. China has imposed a virtual lockdown on Wuhan and severely restricted travel in its wider province of Hubei and some other cities.

  • J&J Files Application for Darzalex Label Expansion With FDA
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    J&J Files Application for Darzalex Label Expansion With FDA

    J&J (JNJ) seeks approval for new Darzalex combo regimen in the United States to treat relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma patients who have received one to three prior lines of therapy.

  • Amgen 2020 outlook falls short of Street estimates; shares slump
    Reuters

    Amgen 2020 outlook falls short of Street estimates; shares slump

    The difference is largely due to lower interest income and anticipated accounting for the recently acquired 20.5% stake in China's BeiGene Ltd , Amgen's chief financial officer, Peter Griffith, said on a conference call. For the fourth quarter of last year, Amgen said product sales fell 2% from a year earlier due to competition from lower-cost generic drugs and biosimilars, but share buybacks reduced the number of shares outstanding, enabling the company to post a per-share profit that topped Wall Street estimates.

  • Amgen, Walt Disney, Microsoft, Apple and Oracle highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Amgen, Walt Disney, Microsoft, Apple and Oracle highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Amgen, Walt Disney, Microsoft, Apple and Oracle highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Better Buy: Amgen vs. Celgene
    Motley Fool

    Better Buy: Amgen vs. Celgene

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  • Motley Fool

    Why Amgen's Spending Billions to Buy This 1 Drug; Plus Heart Disease Has a New Enemy

    Amgen is acquiring Otezla, and The Medicines Company unveils stellar data for its cholesterol treatment.

  • 4 Biotech Stocks With Big Catalysts in September
    Motley Fool

    4 Biotech Stocks With Big Catalysts in September

    Two presentations at the World Conference on Lung Cancer will make a big difference for at least four different drugmakers.

  • Here's Why Alexion Pharmaceuticals Dropped 11% in August
    Motley Fool

    Here's Why Alexion Pharmaceuticals Dropped 11% in August

    It was a roller coaster of a month for the biotech.

  • U.S. judge rules for Regeneron, Sanofi in Amgen cholesterol drug patent fight
    Reuters

    U.S. judge rules for Regeneron, Sanofi in Amgen cholesterol drug patent fight

    The ruling from U.S. District Judge Richard Andrews in Wilmington, Delaware was the latest reversal of fortune in a long-running lawsuit in which Amgen is seeking to stop French drugmaker Sanofi and U.S. biotech Regeneron from selling their drug Praluent. Repatha and Praluent won U.S. approval about two weeks apart in July of 2016.

  • 3 Top Biotech Stocks to Buy Right Now
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Biotech Stocks to Buy Right Now

    Patent cliffs and pipeline risks are among the reasons these biologic drug specialists are attractively priced today.

  • Amgen and Celgene’s Otezla Deal: Key Highlights
    Market Realist

    Amgen and Celgene’s Otezla Deal: Key Highlights

    On August 26, Amgen (AMGN) announced the purchase of leading immunology drug Otezla from Celgene (CELG) for a cash consideration of $13.4 billion.

  • Motley Fool

    What Happened in the Stock Market Today

    Bristol-Myers Squibb and Celgene made a deal to sell a blockbuster drug to Amgen, and Disney and Target are forming a retail collaboration.

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