ASC.L - ASOS Plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
1,189.98
+129.98 (+12.26%)
As of 12:36PM BST. Market open.
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Previous close1,060.00
Open1,150.00
Bid1,183.00 x 0
Ask1,193.00 x 0
Day's range1,092.00 - 1,221.00
52-week range975.20 - 4,090.00
Volume446,514
Avg. volume790,345
Market cap999.095M
Beta (5Y monthly)2.19
PE ratio (TTM)40.48
EPS (TTM)29.40
Earnings date08 Apr 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est4,263.19
  • Coronavirus: Asos’ logistics firm to deliver protective equipment for NHS
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: Asos’ logistics firm to deliver protective equipment for NHS

    Clipper Logistics said it had already begun delivering personal protective equipment to NHS hospitals across the UK.

  • Retailers Wish You'd Be Back Shopping By Easter
    Bloomberg

    Retailers Wish You'd Be Back Shopping By Easter

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Donald Trump wasn’t alone in hoping everyone’s lives could get back to normal by Easter weekend.Retailers’ decisions to furlough hundreds of thousands of U.S. retail workers this week underscore that store closures are set to go on for much longer than initially anticipated. Closings in many major markets around the world will remain in place through next weekend and beyond, wreaking havoc with the prime spring shopping season.Hennes & Mauritz AB said on Friday that net sales fell by 46% in March from the year earlier. It expects a loss in its second quarter. The extended closures will now affect crucial pre-Easter shopping period, worth about $25 billion to U.S. retailers, according to GlobalData. While people may still indulge in filling their children’s baskets with chocolate eggs to create some holiday cheer in this difficult time, crackdowns on even the smallest of gatherings mean they won’t be planning big fancy meals, nor refreshing their bunny-and-chick-themed decorations.  What’s more, consumers can’t take advantage of the long holiday weekend in much of Europe to start shopping for the latest trends for summer. That’s a blow because it typically kicks off the period when consumers refresh their wardrobes, home decorations and gardens for the warmer months. If temperatures soar, that can normally set non-food retailers fair for the coming quarter.  From there, people’s diaries would typically be chock full with weddings, graduations and parties, plenty of reasons to update one’s wardrobe. But the novel coronavirus has radically changed all of that, eliminating pretty much any reason to dress for success. It’s estimated that half of couples planning weddings in the U.S. this year are looking to postpone them, according to data from the Wedding Report. The graduation season has been thrown into question. More than 80 U.S. colleges and universities have either canceled, postponed or been turned their 2020 commencement ceremonies into virtual gatherings. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Nordstrom (@nordstrom) on Apr 2, 2020 at 5:40pm PDTThat means everything from floral dresses to pastel hued shoes may have to be offloaded. Discounting to clear unwanted stock means the crisis is likely to last well into the second quarter, and possibly beyond.There’s another reason why the impact on may be bigger than initially feared: Some online demand has evaporated. Retailers have to ensure workers processing internet orders observe strict social distancing rules. So far British online fashion group Asos Plc, which generated 13% of its sales from the U.S., has kept its warehouses in Atlanta, Berlin and the U.K. open, albeit with longer delivery times. But rival fashion chain Next Plc has stopped taking online orders while it reconfigures its distribution centers. This would be in line with its worst case scenario of the business being closed for four weeks, cutting full-year sales by 1 billion pounds ($1.2 billion).No wonder store chains have shifted to cash preservation mode. H&M said it was taking a number of initiatives, from cutting working hours to seeking rent reductions, to try to cope. In the U.S., hundreds of thousands of staff are being temporarily laid off, with chains such as Macy’s Inc., J.C. Penney Co., Kohl’s Corp. and Gap Inc. halting pay for much of their workforce while preserving some benefits. The longer the hiatus in consumer spending, the more likely that some retailers and restaurants just won’t open their doors again. Others may decide to radically cut down on their brick-and-mortar locations. U.S. department stores, already grappling with the shift to online and mostly lackluster product selections, look particularly challenged.But even companies that do emerge relatively unscathed could find recovery just as demanding. Consumers who have kept their jobs will likely be eager to splash out on holiday and work attire when they’re finally able to move about freely and go back to the office, purchases they can fund with money saved during lockdown on everything from gym memberships and dining out.The question is whether any pent up demand will be enough to alleviate lost sales from those who have been temporarily laid off, or worse, made redundant. Individuals in fear of losing their jobs, or being forced to take pay cuts, are likely to save more. So consumer-facing companies need to brace themselves for a long haul.  It’s going to be some time before stores reopen, and even longer before they get back to any semblance of normality.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-CLOSING SNAPSHOT: A BRUTAL MONTH IS OVER

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London. After the recovery in oil prices and the surprise expansion in Chinese factory activity revived confidence in equity markets, European bourses had a nice run this morning and even if later shares struggled to find a direction, they ended the day well on the black though. The pandemic has led Europe into a financial crisis which threatens to morph into a replay of the 2010 sovereign debt crisis which had the very existence of the euro zone at stake.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-European retail: Empty cash drawers

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London. Morgan Stanley believes earnings numbers on European retailers are now irrelevant and cash is becoming king instead.

  • 2 FTSE stocks I think you should consider in this market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    2 FTSE stocks I think you should consider in this market crash

    Jabran Khan presents two potential opportunities in this crash.The post 2 FTSE stocks I think you should consider in this market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Asos accused of playing 'Russian Roulette with people's lives' during coronavirus pandemic
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Asos accused of playing 'Russian Roulette with people's lives' during coronavirus pandemic

    Union bosses warn online fashion retailer is encouraging dangerous work practices by not enforcing coronavirus social distancing rules. Asos denies the claim.

  • A dirt-cheap growth stock I WON’T be buying for my Stocks and Shares ISA
    Fool.co.uk

    A dirt-cheap growth stock I WON’T be buying for my Stocks and Shares ISA

    Thinking of buying this growth share at current prices? Think again, says Royston Wild.The post A dirt-cheap growth stock I WON’T be buying for my Stocks and Shares ISA appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Here are the FTSE stocks I bought last week
    Fool.co.uk

    Here are the FTSE stocks I bought last week

    While other investors have been panicking, Edward Sheldon has been buying these FTSE stocks. The post Here are the FTSE stocks I bought last week appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • How Does ASOS's (LON:ASC) P/E Compare To Its Industry, After The Share Price Drop?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Does ASOS's (LON:ASC) P/E Compare To Its Industry, After The Share Price Drop?

    Unfortunately for some shareholders, the ASOS (LON:ASC) share price has dived 61% in the last thirty days. Indeed the...

  • Asos (LON:ASC): are you aware of these financial risks?
    Stockopedia

    Asos (LON:ASC): are you aware of these financial risks?

    Legendary stock trader Paul Tudor Jones once said: “At the end of the day, the most important thing is how good are you at risk control.quot; Yet it is all to8230;

  • Shopping Malls Face Their Coronavirus Reckoning
    Bloomberg

    Shopping Malls Face Their Coronavirus Reckoning

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The biggest coronavirus risk to retailers on both sides of the Atlantic may turn out to be empty stores, rather than empty shelves.As the outbreak has spread from Asia to Europe and the U.S., concern has shifted from the impact on supply chains because of closed Chinese factories to the potential of the deadly disease to put a sudden brake on consumer spending.While fashion chains and do-it-yourself merchandisers rely less on China today than they did a decade ago, it’s inevitable there will be some supply problems. The country is still the world’s biggest clothing exporter, and it makes everything from paddling pools to power tools. Associated British Foods Plc, owner of cheap chic fashion chain Primark, and U.S. athletic apparel maker Under Armour Inc. have recently warned of the risks.A full understanding of the impact will only come later. Many spring fashions and home furnishings were shipped before the outbreak, and there is evidence that factories are returning to work. But the closures in February will mean that some orders for the summer and potentially even the back-to-school shopping seasons may not reach stores in time. For apparel retailers this is a particular risk. If say, pastel hued coats designed to be worn in the spring arrive when the weather is warmer, those coats will need to be discounted to sell.But some canceled orders may be a blessing.The worry now is not that shoppers won’t find what they are looking for, it’s that they won’t hit the mall and spend time browsing for it in the first place. Almost half of U.K. retailers surveyed by consultancy Retail Economics and law firm Squire Patton Boggs had already seen a negative impact on their sales, with three quarters expecting revenue to be hit if the virus continues, according to a report published on Wednesday.This adds to anecdotal evidence, from some retailers finding trading tougher than expected to others seeing footfall weaken. In the U.K., traffic to stores held up until Thursday, but as bad news about the virus intensified, shopper numbers dropped, particularly in malls. Even for a Tuesday evening in March, London’s Oxford Street seemed unusually quiet yesterday. Expect the same pattern in the U.S. as new cases pop up in new cities.  It would be understandable if people hesitate to head to the mall and avoid lingering at the supermarket after filling their cart with hand sanitizer, toilet paper and food staples for a month. After all, employers such as Amazon.com Inc. are telling workers to limit non-essential travel and governments in countries like France are banning events for more than 5,000, leaving worried citizens to wonder how many people is too many people in one place. And with Covid-19’s symptoms silent for a long incubation period it can be tempting to avoid public spaces altogether. Reasons for splurging at the shops are also evaporating as major events get canceled or delayed, and by extension people contemplate skipping parties, weddings or graduations. For example, tech giants including Facebook Inc. and Twitter Inc. have pulled out of the South by Southwest tech conference in Austin, Texas. That means purchases that would have been made — from trendy sneakers to wear at SXSW to the suit to impress at any number of industry conferences — may be lost.Travel is another boon to spending that risks being sapped. Tour operator TUI AG said holiday bookings have weakened over the past week. Unless they come back later on, that means fewer bikinis and tubes of suntan lotion filling shopping carts. If the problem is consumers hibernating, then online retailers such as Amazon and Britain’s Asos Plc, could be protected. But if the issue is a lack of stimulants to spending, no one will be spared. There’s also the knock on effect on restaurants and bars if consumers stay home.There may be some offsetting factors. For example, Brits and Americans have been bulk buying essentials in retailers such as Costco Wholesale Corp. Long-life milk, nappies and bottled water are all in demand at supermarkets. At the other end of the spectrum, shares in Peloton Interactive Inc. defied the market rout last week on hopes that more fitness fanatics would work out at home, rather than go to the gym.Any short-term silver linings will be lost if consumers simply hunker down. The risk of a pandemic, as well as market uncertainty or worse, are hardly conducive to splashing out. Britons had started spending again after pulling in their purse strings during the impasse over their departure from the European Union. In contrast, U.S. consumer confidence has remained remarkably robust. But cracks are emerging. U.K. consumer confidence dropped for the first time in five months, according to YouGov and the Centre for Economics and Business Research. Meanwhile, in the U.S., the Bloomberg Weekly Consumer Comfort Index suffered its largest one-week drop since late October in the week ending Feb. 23.As with trading, it’s hard to separate out what’s due to the virus and what’s down to other factors.  But either way,  it’s a timely reminder that faced with an epidemic, consumer demand also isn’t immune.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Sweden's Klarna dips to first loss after U.S. expansion

    Swedish online lender Klarna, which is backed by rapper Snoop Dogg, reported its first annual loss on Wednesday after a year of expansion in the United States and Europe. This is the first year in which Klarna has posted a loss since it was set-up in 2005, making it an outlier among tech companies which often lose money for years. Klarna, which was Europe's most richly valued financial technology company until it was matched by British banking app Revolut, launched a U.S. shopping app in 2019 and opened a tech hub in Berlin, which employs 500 staff.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Online luxury fashion retailer MyTheresa plans NYSE listing -sources

    MUNICH/FRANKFURT, Feb 13 (Reuters) - Online luxury fashion retailer MyTheresa plans to list on the New York Stock Exchange, taking advantage of robust equity markets, people close to the matter said. Its owner Neiman Marcus is working with Morgan Stanley on the planned listing, which could take place as early as April, they added. The buyout fund Ares, which owns Neiman Marcus, and Morgan Stanley declined to comment, while MyTheresa was not available for comment.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Ending it on a high (contains possible spoiler)

    * Wall Street hits another record Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan. The STOXX 600 closed up 0.6% at 431.07 points, that's just 0.06 points away the record high reached in afternoon trading.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-"Renewa-bull or Renewabubble?"

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan.

  • How much money fashion and retail brands make every second in the UK
    Yahoo Finance UK

    How much money fashion and retail brands make every second in the UK

    The UK high street sales have taken a battering in recent months, but some brands are doing exceptionally well online. Here's a sample of how cash registers are ringing.

  • What to Watch: Markets dive on virus fears, Black Friday boost for Asos, and VW fine
    Yahoo Finance UK

    What to Watch: Markets dive on virus fears, Black Friday boost for Asos, and VW fine

    A daily overview of the top business, market, and economic stories to watch in the UK, Europe, and abroad.

  • Britain's ASOS back in vogue with Christmas sales beat
    Reuters

    Britain's ASOS back in vogue with Christmas sales beat

    British online fashion group ASOS beat forecasts for Christmas sales, increasing investor confidence that management has addressed the operational and execution issues that plagued it in 2019, and sending its shares higher. The stock was up 1.95% at 1057 GMT on Thursday after ASOS, which sells fashion aimed at 20-somethings, said its retail sales rose 20% to 1.075 billion pounds ($1.41 billion) in the four months to Dec. 31. ASOS said it benefited from a record Black Friday, product innovation and a step-up in promotions, driving a 20% increase in total orders to 27.7 million.

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