AVST.L - Avast Plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
413.00
-8.20 (-1.95%)
At close: 4:35PM GMT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close421.20
Open421.60
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask480.00 x 0
Day's range409.00 - 428.60
52-week range277.20 - 552.00
Volume2,769,555
Avg. volume3,417,859
Market cap4.164B
Beta (5Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)21.51
EPS (TTM)19.20
Earnings date26 Feb 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.07 (1.60%)
Ex-dividend date12 Sep 2019
1y target est4.19
  • £2K to invest? I’d check out these 2 high-flying FTSE 250 growth stocks
    Fool.co.uk

    £2K to invest? I’d check out these 2 high-flying FTSE 250 growth stocks

    These FTSE 250 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) growth stocks are up more than 65% in the last year alone, and are well worth a look.The post £2K to invest? I'd check out these 2 high-flying FTSE 250 growth stocks appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Aston Martin and Funding Circle Left Painful Scars
    Bloomberg

    Aston Martin and Funding Circle Left Painful Scars

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It’s easy to announce an initial public offering in Europe, but far harder to complete it. Don’t be distracted by the handful of decent-sized share issues launched in January. The recent evidence suggests that the target audience for European IPOs is smaller, fussier and harder to reach than it used to be.Some 17 offerings totaling 1.4 billion euros ($1.6 billion) were unveiled in January on European bourses. Look at how deals fared in the second half of last year and it’s hard to be confident that they will all reach the finishing line. Fourteen IPOs worth more than 100 million euros debuted in the last six months of 2019 (ignoring investment companies), Bloomberg data show. But nine got pulled. That’s an uncomfortably close ratio between offerings that got away and those that failed. Glance at the U.S. in the same period, or Europe in the preceding six months, and deal failures such as WeWork were vastly outnumbered by successes like Nexi SpA.Clearly, the acute uncertainty around Brexit late last year was a dampener, making U.S. investors even more reluctant to leave their domestic market.But Brexit probably just exacerbated existing problems. The drift to passive investment strategies is gradually reducing the number of active fund managers on whose support the IPO market relies. Those active managers that remain have to run more concentrated portfolios to beat their benchmark. Gone are the days when they would automatically buy most new stock offerings put before them.The private-equity cycle hasn’t helped. Buyouts looking to go public nowadays are likely to have been purchased several years into the recovery in asset prices after the financial crisis; their owners will probably have injected more debt to juice up returns, making the assets less attractive to stock-market investors.Meanwhile, MiFID rules have led investment banks to cut back their equity sales and research staff. That, in turn, weakens relationships with the asset management community. Even before that happened, book-runner syndicates tended to be smaller in Europe than in the U.S.The spectacular losses inflicted by a handful of London deals from 2018, notably Aston Martin Lagonda Global Holdings Plc, Funding Circle Holdings Plc and Amigo Holdings Plc linger in the memory. Even that year’s star performer, cyber-security group Avast Plc, has dipped in 2020.Some of these impediments could ease. The S&P 500 index trades on 19 times expected earnings versus the Bloomberg European 500 Index’s 16 times. Maybe that discount could tempt international investors to look at European stocks and, with them, IPOs. January has seen successful share sales by companies that are already listed. But there’s still no clarity on Brexit’s final shape, and MiFID is here to stay.It adds up to a headache for companies looking to go public. One option is to hold back until the business has grown big enough to justify a decent market capitalization. Active fund managers may then be interested, knowing the shares will be liquid and will get a boost from forced buying by index funds. But for those who can’t wait, finding supportive investors has gone from shaking the tree to panning for gold.To contact the author of this story: Chris Hughes at chughes89@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • FTSE 250 tech stock Avast fell 23% last week. What’s the best move now?
    Fool.co.uk

    FTSE 250 tech stock Avast fell 23% last week. What’s the best move now?

    FTSE 250 (INDEXFTSE: MCX) stock Avast fell sharply last week. Here's why. The post FTSE 250 tech stock Avast fell 23% last week. What’s the best move now? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Avast Plunge Exposes Frailty of Prague’s Dormant Stock Market
    Bloomberg

    Avast Plunge Exposes Frailty of Prague’s Dormant Stock Market

    (Bloomberg) -- The Czech stock market just had its worst week in years, and it’s mainly because of a company that didn’t even plan to be traded there.A privacy scandal at Avast Plc wiped out more than a fifth of the Prague-based software maker’s value last week, dragging the PX Index of 12 stocks down 6.2%. That was the worst slump among benchmarks worldwide after Hong Kong.The underperformance was the latest blow to the standing of the Prague Stock Exchange, which has been plagued by years of waning interest from rights issuers, investors, traders and analysts. An underdeveloped pension-fund industry and a risk-averse population are curbing demand for equities, while companies overwhelmingly prefer debt financing over share sales.The week “has clearly shown how badly Prague needs more IPOs that would attract more investors, boost liquidity, and offer a more diversified spectrum of different sectors,” said Martin Cakl, an equity analyst at Patria Finance AS. “Last year, Avast pulled the whole market up. Now it’s sinking it.”The overall traded volume of the bourse has fallen by 77% over the past decade, weighed down by buyouts and delistings that have eclipsed a trickle of initial public offerings. In the same period, turnover has increased 31% for Poland’s WIG20 Index, and 137% for the MSCI Emerging Markets Index.Trying to reverse the long-term slump, the Czech exchange has reduced fees and launched an IPO market for small startups. It has also actively cross-listed stocks from other bourses, in some cases through so-called unsponsored listings that don’t need to be initiated or approved by the issuer. That was the case with Avast, which held an IPO in London in 2018 and didn’t intend to be traded in its hometown, said Prague Stock Exchange spokesman Jiri Kovarik.An Avast spokeswoman couldn’t be reached for comment.Now, with a $5.8 billion market value and a mere 0.6% weighting in the U.K.’s FTSE 250 Index, the company is the fourth-biggest constituent of the PX Index. Its 14% weighting puts it behind only two banks and a power utility that between them account for 56% of the Czech gauge.Avast shares started recovering on Friday and gained a further 4.3% on Monday to 443.2 pence as of 9:18 a.m. in London. In Prague, they jumped 6.3%, turning the Czech equity index into one of the world’s best performers at the start of the new week.(Updates with shares recovering in last paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: Krystof Chamonikolas in Prague at kchamonikola@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Blaise Robinson at brobinson58@bloomberg.net, Paul Jarvis, John ViljoenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Avast pulls plug on Jumpshot after data privacy scandal
    Reuters

    Avast pulls plug on Jumpshot after data privacy scandal

    Avast allegedly collected data on what many of its users did online and sent it to Jumpshot, which then offered to sell the information to clients, media reports said this week. Jumpshot, which Avast started in 2015, analyses consumers' online habits by measuring their search, click and buy patterns across thousands of categories from over 150 websites, including Amazon, Google, Netflix, and Walmart, its website https://www.jumpshot.com/about shows. Clients of Jumpshot include cosmetics maker Revlon, hotel search website Tripadvisor and chipmaker Intel.

  • Avast shuts down marketing analytics subsidiary Jumpshot amid controversy over selling user data
    TechCrunch

    Avast shuts down marketing analytics subsidiary Jumpshot amid controversy over selling user data

    Avast announced that it would be winding down Jumpshot, its $180 million marketing technology subsidiary that had been in the business of collecting data from across the web, including within walled gardens, analysing it, and then -- unknown to users -- selling it on to third-party customers that included tech giants like Microsoft and Google and big brands like Pepsi and Home Depot. "We started Jumpshot in 2015 with the idea of extending our data analytics capabilities beyond core security," writes the CEO Ondrej Vlcek in a blog post in response to Jumpshot news. Today's news comes on the heels of a series of developments and investigations highlighting Jumpshot's practices, stretching back to December, when Mozilla and Opera removed Avast extensions after reports that they were collecting user data and browsing histories.

  • Something To Consider Before Buying Avast Plc (LON:AVST) For The 2.3% Dividend
    Simply Wall St.

    Something To Consider Before Buying Avast Plc (LON:AVST) For The 2.3% Dividend

    Dividend paying stocks like Avast Plc (LON:AVST) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason - some...

  • Reuters

    Avast reviews options for Jumpshot on data privacy concerns (Jan. 29)

    Avast allegedly collected data on what many of its users did online and sent it to its unit, Jumpshot, which then offered to sell the information to clients, according to the media reports on Monday. Shares of Avast were down 4.6% as of 1332 GMT.

  • A FTSE 250 tech growth stock I’d buy after this 10% price crash
    Fool.co.uk

    A FTSE 250 tech growth stock I’d buy after this 10% price crash

    I think this FTSE 250 (INDEXFTSE: MCX) growth stock looks very tempting, despite one broker's downgrade.The post A FTSE 250 tech growth stock I'd buy after this 10% price crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Analysts at Jefferies just lifted their price target for this FTSE 250 tech stock by 38%
    Fool.co.uk

    Analysts at Jefferies just lifted their price target for this FTSE 250 tech stock by 38%

    Analysts at Jefferies appear to be very bullish on this FTSE 250 (INDEXFTSE: MCX) technology stock. The post Analysts at Jefferies just lifted their price target for this FTSE 250 tech stock by 38% appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • 3 UK stocks I’d buy TODAY for 2020 and beyond
    Fool.co.uk

    3 UK stocks I’d buy TODAY for 2020 and beyond

    Looking for stocks to buy today? Here's a FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) stock and two under-the-radar growth stocks that Edward Sheldon believes are priced to buy.

  • Avast Plc (LON:AVST) Earns Among The Best Returns In Its Industry
    Simply Wall St.

    Avast Plc (LON:AVST) Earns Among The Best Returns In Its Industry

    Today we'll look at Avast Plc (LON:AVST) and reflect on its potential as an investment. In particular, we'll consider...

  • Is Avast Plc's (LON:AVST) 20% ROE Better Than Average?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Avast Plc's (LON:AVST) 20% ROE Better Than Average?

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

  • Independent Non-Executive Director Erwin Gunst Just Sold A Bunch Of Shares In Avast Plc (LON:AVST)
    Simply Wall St.

    Independent Non-Executive Director Erwin Gunst Just Sold A Bunch Of Shares In Avast Plc (LON:AVST)

    Some Avast Plc (LON:AVST) shareholders may be a little concerned to see that the Independent Non-Executive Director...

  • Reuters

    Avast target of cyber-security attack, company and Czech counterintelligence say

    Czech-based Avast and Czech counterintelligence service BIS said on Monday they had detected a network attack on the cyber-security company which the BIS suspected of originating in China. Avast said in a blog post that it found suspicious behavior on its network on Sept. 23 and opened an investigation involving the BIS and Czech police along with an external forensics team. The BIS said in a statement that - with contribution from foreign partners - it detected a threat to products of Avast, a company founded in the Czech Republic.

  • Do Directors Own Avast Plc (LON:AVST) Shares?
    Simply Wall St.

    Do Directors Own Avast Plc (LON:AVST) Shares?

    Every investor in Avast Plc (LON:AVST) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups. Generally speaking, as...

  • How Much Are Avast Plc (LON:AVST) Insiders Taking Off The Table?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Much Are Avast Plc (LON:AVST) Insiders Taking Off The Table?

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. Unfortunately, there are...

  • The Avast share price at 361p: three reasons it could go higher
    Stockopedia

    The Avast share price at 361p: three reasons it could go higher

    Often the real stock market winners are not the shares that look obviously cheap compared to book value or earnings but are instead the slightly more expensive8230;

  • It Might Be Better To Avoid Avast Plc's (LON:AVST) Upcoming 1.2% Dividend
    Simply Wall St.

    It Might Be Better To Avoid Avast Plc's (LON:AVST) Upcoming 1.2% Dividend

    Avast Plc (LON:AVST) stock is about to trade ex-dividend in 3 days time. You can purchase shares before the 12th of...

  • Here's Why Avast (LON:AVST) Can Manage Its Debt Responsibly
    Simply Wall St.

    Here's Why Avast (LON:AVST) Can Manage Its Debt Responsibly

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's...

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