BA - The Boeing Company

NYSE - Nasdaq Real-time price. Currency in USD
368.27
-1.19 (-0.32%)
As of 1:20PM EST. Market open.
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Previous close369.46
Open373.51
Bid368.51 x 1200
Ask368.69 x 1200
Day's range361.61 - 374.83
52-week range292.47 - 446.01
Volume4,638,466
Avg. volume4,504,236
Market cap207.259B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.24
PE ratio (TTM)55.43
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield8.22 (2.24%)
Ex-dividend date2019-11-07
1y target estN/A
  • U.S. safety board wants Boeing to redesign part after fatal 737 NG accident
    Reuters

    U.S. safety board wants Boeing to redesign part after fatal 737 NG accident

    The board said the Federal Aviation Administration should require Boeing to determine the fan blade impact location or locations on the engine fan case and redesign the structure. The board did not fault Boeing's analysis in the mid-1990s when it developed the case.

  • United Airlines Suspends Boeing MAX Flights Until March 2020
    Zacks

    United Airlines Suspends Boeing MAX Flights Until March 2020

    United Airlines (UAL) extends the grounding period of its Boeing 737 MAX jets through next March with persistent ambiguity surrounding the aircraft's return to service.

  • Qantas challenges Airbus, Boeing to offer better deal on ultra-long haul jets
    Reuters

    Qantas challenges Airbus, Boeing to offer better deal on ultra-long haul jets

    Qantas has asked Airbus and Boeing for a better deal on planes capable of non-stop Sydney-London flights before deciding whether to place an order. "We asked them to go back and re-look at that to sharpen their pencils because there still was a gap there," Qantas International Chief Executive Tino La Spina told an investor briefing on Tuesday after Qantas outlined plans for capital spending to average A$2 billion ($1.36 billion) a year. The Australian airline is considering launching the world's longest non-stop flights because it sees demand for time-poor travellers willing to pay a premium to cut out stop-overs.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Amazon, Johnson & Johnson, Boeing and PetroChina
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Amazon, Johnson & Johnson, Boeing and PetroChina

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Amazon, Johnson & Johnson, Boeing and PetroChina

  • Will the $1.2B 737 Max Deal Aid Boeing's Commercial Business?
    Zacks

    Will the $1.2B 737 Max Deal Aid Boeing's Commercial Business?

    Boeing (BA) wins a deal from SunExpress for delivering 10 737 Max 8 jets. This comes as a much needed breather for its commercial business that has been staggering for past few months.

  • U.S. safety board wants Boeing to redesign 737 NG part after fatal Southwest accident
    Reuters

    U.S. safety board wants Boeing to redesign 737 NG part after fatal Southwest accident

    The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board on Tuesday called on Boeing Co to redesign the fan cowl structure on all 737 NG planes and retrofit existing planes after an April 2019 incident in which a woman was killed on a Southwest Airlines plane after an engine failure caused by a fan blade. The board said the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration should require Boeing to determine the fan blade impact location or locations on the engine fan case and redesign the structure to minimize the potential of a catastrophic failure. The board did not fault Boeing's analysis in the mid-1990s when it developed the case.

  • Emirates wants new Boeing jet put through 'hell on Earth' in testing
    Reuters

    Emirates wants new Boeing jet put through 'hell on Earth' in testing

    Emirates, the largest customer of Boeing's upcoming 777x aircraft, wants the plane to be put through "hell on Earth" in testing to ensure it is safe to fly and meets performance expectations, the president of the Gulf airline said on Tuesday. Tim Clark was speaking at the Dubai Airshow after meeting the head of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The testing and certification of aircraft has been under scrutiny after the grounding of Boeing's 737 MAX jet following two fatal crashes, while problems with a number of models have led some airlines to accuse plane and engine makers of over-promising on performance capabilities.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - Wall Street Rises on Trade Optimism; Retailers Fall

    Investing.com – Wall Street rose on Tuesday as investors remained optimistic about trade after Washington extended an exception for U.S. companies that do business with black-listed Chinese firm Huawei.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - Home Depot, Kohl’s Tumble Premarket; Boeing Rises

    Investing.com - Stocks in focus in premarket trading on Tuesday:

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Air Astana says signs letter of intent for 30 Boeing 737 MAX

    Kazakhstan flag carrier Air Astana said on Tuesday it had signed a letter of intent to order 30 Boeing 737 MAX for its recently launched low-cost carrier subsidiary Fly Arystana. The carrier, which operates Airbus and Embraer jets in its main network, said it was confident in Boeing's ability to resolve problems over the grounding of the MAX in the wake of two accidents. "We are making flying affordable for the people of Kazakhstan," Chief Planning Officer Alma Aliguzhinova told reporters at the Dubai Airshow, adding the budget subsidiary would start taking the jets in late 2021.

  • Sales of grounded Boeing 737 MAX gather pace at Dubai Airshow
    Reuters

    Sales of grounded Boeing 737 MAX gather pace at Dubai Airshow

    Boeing's 737 MAX took centre stage at the Dubai Airshow on Tuesday as airlines announced plans to order up to 50 of the jets worth $6 billion at list prices despite a global grounding in place since March. Kazakhstan flag carrier Air Astana said it had signed a letter of intent to order 30 Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets for its FlyArystan subsidiary. Air Astana, which operates Airbus and Embraer jets in its main network, said it was confident in Boeing's ability to resolve problems with the MAX.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    CORRECTED-UPDATE 2-Sales of grounded Boeing 737 MAX gather pace at Dubai Airshow

    Boeing's 737 MAX took centre stage at the Dubai Airshow on Tuesday as airlines announced plans to order up to 50 of the jets worth $6 billion at list prices despite a global grounding in place since March. Kazakhstan flag carrier Air Astana said it had signed a letter of intent to order 30 Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets for its FlyArystan subsidiary. Air Astana, which operates Airbus and Embraer jets in its main network, said it was confident in Boeing's ability to resolve problems with the MAX.

  • Boeing to give Southwest board 737 MAX update this week
    Reuters

    Boeing to give Southwest board 737 MAX update this week

    Boeing Co this week will present to the board of its largest 737 MAX customer, Southwest Airlines Co , an overview of its plans to return the grounded jet to service, a spokesman for the airline said on Monday. The meeting on Wednesday and Thursday comes after Southwest Chief Executive Gary Kelly said last month that the airline could look next year at diversifying its fleet beyond Boeing 737 aircraft. Budget-friendly Southwest has structured its business model around flying only 737 aircraft for the past 50 years and bet its entire growth strategy on the 737 MAX, the latest iteration of Boeing's narrowbody workhorse.

  • Lawsuit against Boeing seeks to hold board liable for 737 MAX problems
    Reuters

    Lawsuit against Boeing seeks to hold board liable for 737 MAX problems

    The lawsuit is the latest legal challenge facing Boeing over the 737 MAX crash in Indonesia in October 2018 that killed all 189 passengers and crew and another in Ethiopia that killed all 157 people in March. The 737 MAX has been grounded worldwide since the Ethiopian crash as Boeing seeks regulatory approval for updates to software believed to have played a role in both crashes.

  • Top Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Amazon & Johnson & Johnson
    Zacks

    Top Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Amazon & Johnson & Johnson

    Top Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Amazon & Johnson & Johnson

  • Boeing Directors Sued Over Missed Warning Signs on 737 Max 8
    Bloomberg

    Boeing Directors Sued Over Missed Warning Signs on 737 Max 8

    (Bloomberg) -- Boeing Co. directors were careless in their oversight of the flawed 737 Max 8 airliner and failed to react promptly after two crashes killed more than 300 people, according to a shareholder lawsuit seeking to hold company board members accountable.The directors missed repeated red flags during development of the 737 Max’s automated flight-control systems and then waited months to investigate the role of design flaws in a fatal Lion Air crash late last year in Indonesia, according the suit filed Monday in Delaware Chancery Court by the Kirby Family Partnership LP. In March, an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max crashed in Africa.In its rush to get the 737 Max to market, Boeing didn’t property test the new system or adequately train pilots, the lawsuit alleges. Along with the subsequent grounding of all 737 Max aircraft, the board’s actions hurt the company “through loss of credibility in the marketplace, a damaged reputation and billions in potential business costs and liability,” according to Kirby, which says it has owned Boeing shares since 2018.While Boeing already faces dozens of claims from victims’ families, the Delaware suit may be the first to target directors for their role in the controversy over the crashes.Most of the lawsuits by family members -- for the October 2018 Lion Air crash and the Ethiopian Airlines crash -- have been consolidated in federal court in Chicago. The parents of Samya Stumo, a 24-year-old American aboard the Ethiopian Air flight, sued in April accusing Boeing of rushing the airliner to market while hiding flight-control defects.Read More: When Will Boeing 737 Max Fly Again and More QuestionsPeter Pedraza, a Boeing spokesman, declined to comment on the suit. The company is seeking to correct flight-control flaws and get the 737 Max back in operation.Regulators grounded the plane globally in March after the second of two fatal crashes. The groundings and the failure to get many new orders for new planes has cut at least $225 million from the airline’s operating income and caused tens of thousands of flight cancellations.The company also has been sued by the union for Southwest Airlines Co.’s pilots, who are seeking lost pay due to the 737 Max’s grounding. Southwest is the biggest operator of such planes.The case is Kirby Family Partnership LP v. Dennis Muilenburg, 2019-0907, Delaware Chancery Court (Wilmington)(Updates with company comment in sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Jef Feeley in Wilmington, Delaware at jfeeley@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Steve StrothFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Airplanes Aren’t Selling Like They Used To
    Bloomberg

    Airplanes Aren’t Selling Like They Used To

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Airplanes just aren’t selling like they used to.Monday marked the second day of the Dubai Air Show, and while there was the usual smattering of headlines with big-dollar figures, there was also fresh evidence that the robust aerospace cycle that’s propelled the industry’s stocks to new highs is getting long in the tooth. Carriers including Emirates and Etihad Airways rejiggered orders at the Air Show as they sought to adapt to a global growth slowdown and weaker demand for travel in the Middle East amid stubbornly low oil prices. This follows similar rethinks at British Airways-parent IAG SA and Deutsche Lufthansa AG earlier this month, with both carriers seemingly pushing out or putting on hold orders for Boeing Co.’s 777X wide-body model. The general takeaway is that the world doesn’t need as many planes right now as airlines might have thought just a few years ago, especially when it comes to the biggest jets used for long-distance international flights. The 777X in particular appears to be in trouble, with launch customer Emirates also reportedly contemplating cutting or delaying its order for 150 of the jets, perhaps in part by swapping in some of the smaller 787 Dreamliners. The Middle East is one of the more attractive markets for the 777 model, which is too big to fly in many other regions. So if airlines there are balking, then production rates may need to come down. Complicating things is a delay in the first deliveries of the 777X until 2021 due to durability issues with a General Electric Co. jet engine. Emirates chief Tim Clark has made it clear he’s fed up with a pattern of delayed rollouts, or worse, post-delivery glitches that force costly groundings, and the delay could factor into any decision. Stanley Deal, who took over as head of Boeing’s commercial airplanes division in October following the ouster of Kevin McAllister, told reporters over the weekend that the company was still in talks with Emirates on the 777X and a still yet-to-be-confirmed order for 40 Dreamliners. “Long term, the 777X’s value remains intact,” Deal said.Boeing has also trimmed its production targets for the Dreamliner after expected orders from China failed to materialize. Etihad Airways said at the Dubai Air Show that it will take 20 fewer Dreamliners over the next four years than originally planned as it grapples with eye-popping losses. Airbus SE models weren’t spared from weakening demand, either. Emirates finalized a $16 billion order for 50 Airbus A350 widebody jets — more than it had committed to in February — but appears to have backed away from an earlier commitment to buy 40 A330neos as well, meaning the total value of the deal before customary discounts is less than originally outlined.The news was better in the narrow-body market. Air Arabia inked a firm order for 120 of Airbus’s A320-model jets. Even Boeing’s troubled 737 Max got some love, with Turkish holiday carrier SunExpress exercising an option to add 10 more of the jets to its fleet. Indian low-cost carrier SpiceJet Ltd. may also seize on the dearth of Max orders as an opportunity to pick up some of the jets at a discount as it contemplates a new hub in the Middle East. In an interview with Bloomberg TV, SpiceJet chairman Ajay Singh wouldn’t rule out signing a deal at the air show, although the size and ultimate timing remain up in the air. Even so, the early returns on the Air Show would seem to be at odds with Airbus CEO Guillaume Faury’s  comments last week that aviation demand continues to move “up and up.” Global passenger traffic is indeed still growing, but at a much lower rate than over the past few years. And that matters, because aviation stocks aren’t cheap right now. The SPDR S&P Aerospace and Defense ETF is up 42% so far this year, well outpacing the broader S&P 500 benchmark. The high valuations for aerospace stocks can hold to the extent margins are still on an uptrend and the rebound investors are positioning for in the manufacturing industry plays out, Denise Chisholm, Fidelity’s head of sector strategy, said in a Bloomberg TV interview. At least some airlines, though, are choosing to plan more conservatively.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Airbus dominates second day of Dubai show as Boeing wins MAX order
    Reuters

    Airbus dominates second day of Dubai show as Boeing wins MAX order

    Gulf airlines Emirates and Air Arabia spent a combined $30 billion at list prices on Airbus jetliners as the Dubai Airshow burst into life on Monday, while Boeing won a symbolic first official order for the 737 MAX since its grounding in March. Emirates threw its weight behind the Airbus A350 with an expanded order for 50 jets worth $16 billion, but shelved plans to order the slightly smaller A330neo as the Middle East’s largest carrier embarked on a more diversified fleet structure. The firm order, signed in front of reporters on day two of the Nov 17-21 show, drew a line under the A380 superjumbo, the world's largest airliner which Airbus had decided earlier this year to close, prompting Emirates to order mid-sized planes.

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