BA - The Boeing Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
352.78
-5.97 (-1.66%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous close358.75
Open357.22
Bid345.01 x 1800
Ask350.99 x 800
Day's range351.75 - 357.57
52-week range292.47 - 446.01
Volume3,556,565
Avg. volume7,946,132
Market cap198.485B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.33
PE ratio (TTM)20.19
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield8.22 (2.18%)
Ex-dividend date2019-05-09
1y target estN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Companies to Watch: Qualcomm under pressure, Apple may get hit big, blame pointed at Boeing
    Yahoo Finance18 hours ago

    Companies to Watch: Qualcomm under pressure, Apple may get hit big, blame pointed at Boeing

    Qualcomm, Apple, Boeing, Avon and Beyond Meat are the companies to watch.

  • Investing.com5 hours ago

    Top 5 Things to Know in The Market on Thursday

    These are the top 5 things you need to know in financial markets on Thursday, 23 May.

  • FAA chief: No timetable for return of 737 Max, public will regain confidence
    MarketWatch8 hours ago

    FAA chief: No timetable for return of 737 Max, public will regain confidence

    Public confidence in Boeing’s 737 Max jet is “maybe” shaken after two deadly crashes but that will eventually change, said the chief of the Federal Aviation Administration.

  • Associated Press9 hours ago

    FAA chief says flying public will regain faith in Boeing jet

    FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Public confidence in Boeing's 737 Max jet is "maybe" shaken after two deadly crashes but that will eventually change, said the chief of the Federal Aviation Administration.

  • Reuters11 hours ago

    FAA chief has no timetable for ungrounding Boeing 737 MAX

    FORT WORTH, Texas (Reuters) - The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration said on Wednesday he does not have a specific timetable for when the agency may unground the Boeing 737 MAX that has ...

  • FAA chief has no timetable for Boeing 737 MAX approval
    Reuters12 hours ago

    FAA chief has no timetable for Boeing 737 MAX approval

    FORT WORTH, Texas/MONTREAL (Reuters) - The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration said on Wednesday he does not have a specific timetable to approve Boeing Co's 737 MAX for flight after two fatal crashes since October prompted the plane to be grounded worldwide. The FAA is meeting with more than 30 international air regulators including China, the European Union, Brazil and Canada on Thursday to discuss a software fix and new pilot training that Boeing has been developing to ensure the jets are safe to fly. "It's a constant give and take until it is exactly right," Deputy FAA Administrator Dan Elwell told reporters of the discussions with Boeing.

  • United CEO say’s he’ll be on first 737 Max flight once it’s cleared
    MarketWatch12 hours ago

    United CEO say’s he’ll be on first 737 Max flight once it’s cleared

    CEO Oscar Munoz says he will be aboard United Airlines’ first flight of a Boeing 737 Max once regulators agree to let the aircraft fly again.

  • Associated Press13 hours ago

    United CEO vows to be aboard 737 Max when its cleared to fly

    CHICAGO (AP) — CEO Oscar Munoz says he will be aboard United Airlines' first flight of a Boeing 737 Max once regulators agree to let the aircraft fly again.

  • Reuters13 hours ago

    United CEO promises to rebook passengers concerned about 737 MAX

    United Airlines Chief Executive Oscar Munoz promised on Wednesday to accommodate any passengers concerned about flying Boeing Co's 737 MAX jets once regulators deem the aircraft safe to fly again. United is the only one of the three U.S. MAX operators to make such an announcement so far. Southwest Airlines Co, the world's largest MAX operator, said on Wednesday discussions were still ongoing.

  • Stock Market News: Lowe's Heads Lower; Airlines Want Boeing to Pay
    Motley Fool19 hours ago

    Stock Market News: Lowe's Heads Lower; Airlines Want Boeing to Pay

    The stock market gave up ground on Wednesday morning.

  • 3 Chinese airlines seeking Boeing compensation over 737 Max
    Associated Pressyesterday

    3 Chinese airlines seeking Boeing compensation over 737 Max

    BEIJING (AP) — China is stepping up pressure on Boeing Co. as its airlines demand compensation for the grounding of 737 Max jetliners after fatal crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia.

  • Reutersyesterday

    China's big three airlines seek Boeing compensation over 737 MAX grounding

    China's three biggest airlines have asked U.S. planemaker Boeing Co to compensate them for losses caused by the grounding and delayed deliveries of 737 MAX jets, just as regulators gather to discuss design changes for the troubled aircraft. The triple compensation requests come at a sensitive time in Sino-U.S. relations, with a string of tit-for-tat import tariffs culminating in Washington accusing Beijing of backtracking on almost all aspects of a proposed trade deal. The U.S. administration's latest tariff increase on $200 billion (158 billion pounds) worth of Chinese imports - and hints of more - has prompted fear that China could retaliate against U.S. companies.

  • Associated Pressyesterday

    New lawsuit claims Boeing Max suffered from faulty design

    A new lawsuit says Boeing's design of the 737 Max was faulty and the company was able to rush the plane into production because it faced little oversight from regulators. The lawsuit says the plane could crash if a single part malfunctioned, that Boeing concealed problems and refused to ground the plane on its own. Lawyers say Boeing did the same thing after crashes of earlier 737s in the 1990s.

  • Reuters2 days ago

    Airbus prepares counter-punch to new Boeing mid-sized jet

    Airbus hinted on Tuesday at a price battle and imminent aircraft revamp to counter a possible new Boeing mid-sized jet, promising a "left hook, right hook" from two of its established models. U.S. planemaker Boeing is studying whether to launch a 220-270-seat jet wedged between traditional twin-aisle models like the Airbus A330 or its own 787, and the industry's bread-and-butter single-aisle models like the A320/321 and Boeing 737. Airbus aims to defend that space with its own A330neo at the top end and the best-selling A321neo at the bottom - two models boasting new engines on older airframes.

  • Barrons.com2 days ago

    Boeing Stock Is Up Because Birds Could Have Contributed to a 737 MAX Crash

    The Wall Street Journal reported that a bird may have damaged sensors on the Ethiopian Airlines flight that crashed in March. Investors reacted by sending Boeing shares higher.

  • Reuters2 days ago

    Airbus sticks to delivery goals as industrial problems ease

    Airbus is sticking to its 2019 delivery goals as it makes progress in resolving industrial problems at its Hamburg single-aisle jet plant, the planemaker's recently appointed operations chief said on Tuesday. Airbus has eliminated many delays compared to last year but has room to do more in making deliveries run more evenly over the year, chief operating officer Michael Schoellhorn said. Airbus will review in the second half of the year whether to raise A320-family output beyond a current target of 63 a month, the former BSH Home Appliances executive told a media event.

  • Boeing dismissed chance of 'bird strike' that may have caused second 737 Max crash
    The Guardian2 days ago

    Boeing dismissed chance of 'bird strike' that may have caused second 737 Max crash

    Two local boys examine debris gathered by workers during the continuing recovery efforts at the crash site in Bishoftu, Ethiopia, in March. Photograph: Jemal Countess/Getty ImagesBoeing officials, shortly after the first fatal crash of its 737 Max jet, played down the likelihood that a bird strike could impair the plane’s sensor equipment. Now investigators are exploring whether such a situation led to a second deadly accident just five months later.According to the Wall Street Journal, US aviation authorities believe a bird collision may have set off the sequence of events that led to the downing of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max in March, in which 157 people died.American Airlines pilots called a meeting with Boeing last November after a Lion Air Max crashed in Indonesia, killing all 189 passengers and crew.The Journal reviewed a recording of the meeting in which Mike Sinnett, Boeing’s vice-president of product strategy, raised and dismissed the possibility that a bird strike could trigger a second crash by affecting the Max’s controversial sensor system.Sinnett told the pilots he was “absolutely” confident that heightened pilot awareness following the Lion Air disaster had further reduced the chances of another accident.Ethiopian Airlines has been facing criticism of its pilots’ conduct in the wake of the crash. At a House hearing into the accidents last week, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) administrator, Daniel Elwell, said pilot error contributed to the crash.In both crashes, the Max’s anti-stall system, called the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (Mcas), appears to have forced the planes’ noses down shortly after takeoff, leaving the pilots struggling unsuccessfully to right the jets before they crashed.The Mcas system may have been reacting to faulty information from sensors that could have been damaged by a bird strike.Ethiopian Airlines has rejected accusations that its pilots contributed to the crash. Officials have said Boeing failed to provide cockpit alerts that would have warned the pilots about sensor errors.Last week, the airline said its pilots followed procedures set out by the FAA and Boeing but “none of the expected warnings appeared in the cockpit, which deprived the pilots of necessary and timely information”.Nine countries and the US justice department are currently investigating the crashes.

  • Reuters2 days ago

    Turkish Airlines chairman expects Boeing 737 compensation, to meet Friday

    Turkish Airlines expects compensation from Boeing Co for losses over the grounding of 12 737 Max aircraft, the chairman of Turkey's flagship carrier was quoted as saying, adding that he would meet Boeing's chief executive on Friday. Turkish Airlines grounded all commercial flights by Boeing 737 Max models on March 13 until uncertainty over the safety of the aircraft was resolved, after an accident in Ethiopia killed 157 people in the second such crash for the model in recent months. Turkish Airlines Chairman Ilker Ayci said on Tuesday he would meet Boeing's CEO on Friday to discuss the airline's pending orders from Boeing and its expectations for compensation for its losses, state-owned Anadolu news agency reported.

  • Boeing Wins $164M Modification Deal to Upgrade F/A-18 Jets
    Zacks2 days ago

    Boeing Wins $164M Modification Deal to Upgrade F/A-18 Jets

    Boeing (BA) will provide for the service life modification (SLM) of up to 10 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet jets that will extend the operational service life of the aircraft to 10,000 flight hours.

  • Is The Boeing Company (NYSE:BA) Overpaying Its CEO?
    Simply Wall St.2 days ago

    Is The Boeing Company (NYSE:BA) Overpaying Its CEO?

    Dennis Muilenburg has been the CEO of The Boeing Company (NYSE:BA) since 2015. This report will, first, examine the...

  • Investing.com2 days ago

    Stocks - Kohls, JC Penny, Tesla Fall Premarket; Boeing Rises

    Investing.com - Stocks in focus in premarket trading on Tuesday:

  • U.S. airline group sees record summer travel, despite 737 MAX grounding
    Reuters2 days ago

    U.S. airline group sees record summer travel, despite 737 MAX grounding

    U.S. summer air travel will hit a new record this year despite the grounding of Boeing's 737 MAX aircraft after two fatal crashes, a group representing major airlines said on Tuesday. Airlines for America, the trade group representing major U.S. carriers, said it expects 257.4 million passengers to travel on U.S. airlines between June 1 and Aug. 31, up 3.4 percent from last summer’s record 248.8 million passengers. Airlines are adding 111,000 seats daily to accommodate the extra 93,000 passengers expected per day, the group said, in what it forecast will be the 10th consecutive summer of increases in the number of U.S. airline passengers.

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