BA - The Boeing Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
362.88
-4.08 (-1.11%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

363.49 +0.61 (0.17%)
After hours: 6:47PM EST

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Previous close366.96
Open366.49
Bid362.80 x 1100
Ask363.49 x 800
Day's range360.01 - 367.00
52-week range292.47 - 446.01
Volume5,422,226
Avg. volume4,445,652
Market cap204.226B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.24
PE ratio (TTM)54.62
EPS (TTM)6.64
Earnings date28 Jan 2020 - 3 Feb 2020
Forward dividend & yield8.22 (2.24%)
Ex-dividend date2019-11-07
1y target est379.00
  • Stock Market Live Updates: Dow unchanged for first time since 2014
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock Market Live Updates: Dow unchanged for first time since 2014

    Real-time headlines moving markets.

  • Some U.S. airlines willing to take 737 MAX jets before pilot training approval: sources
    Reuters

    Some U.S. airlines willing to take 737 MAX jets before pilot training approval: sources

    Some U.S. airlines are willing to pick up their 737 MAX jets from Boeing Co as soon as December if the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approves delivery of the grounded planes before new pilot training is agreed, three people with knowledge of the matter said. Hundreds of 737 MAX jets have rolled off Boeing's Seattle production line in the months since two fatal crashes on the aircraft led to a global safety ban, forcing the planemaker to park un-flown jets at facilities across Washington state until regulators approve software and training updates. Boeing on Monday said the FAA could issue an order approving the plane's return to service in December, even though approval for training changes would take more time.

  • Some U.S. airlines willing to take 737 MAX jets before pilot training approval - sources
    Reuters

    Some U.S. airlines willing to take 737 MAX jets before pilot training approval - sources

    Some U.S. airlines are willing to pick up their 737 MAX jets from Boeing Co as soon as December if the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approves delivery of the grounded planes before new pilot training is agreed, three people with knowledge of the matter said. Hundreds of 737 MAX jets have rolled off Boeing's Seattle production line in the months since two fatal crashes on the aircraft led to a global safety ban, forcing the planemaker to park un-flown jets at facilities across Washington state until regulators approve software and training updates. Boeing on Monday said the FAA could issue an order approving the plane's return to service in December, even though approval for training changes would take more time.

  • Flying 14 hours or more? Boeing sees longer routes as 'key' for growth
    Reuters

    Flying 14 hours or more? Boeing sees longer routes as 'key' for growth

    Serving airlines that will operate flights lasting 14 hours or longer is a "key consideration" for Boeing Co's global growth strategy over the next 20 years, an executive said on Tuesday. "Globally, if long haul is growing 5% per year, ultra long haul is growing twice that per year," Darren Hulst, a managing director at Boeing, told Reuters in Sao Paulo while discussing market forecasts for the next 20 years. Commercial aviation overall is expected to grow 4.6% per year on average between 2019 and 2038, according to a Boeing market study released in September, representing a slight slowing from the previous pace of about 5%, according to figures compiled by the World Bank.

  • Boeing gives pilot new job after firestorm over leaked messages -sources
    Reuters

    Boeing gives pilot new job after firestorm over leaked messages -sources

    One of two Boeing Co technical pilots who described flaws in a crucial flight control system in leaked 2016 instant messages has been transferred to a new job at the U.S. planemaker, two people familiar with the matter said on Tuesday. The 2016 conversation between the employee, Patrik Gustavsson, and then-colleague Mark Forkner, erased some $14 billion of its market value after they became public last month. Forkner's comments were among those pinpointed by U.S. lawmakers during back-to-back hearings in Washington as evidence Boeing knew about problems with flight control software well before the two crashes in the span of five months killed a total of 346 people.

  • Boeing gives pilot new job after firestorm over leaked messages: sources
    Reuters

    Boeing gives pilot new job after firestorm over leaked messages: sources

    One of two Boeing Co technical pilots who described flaws in a crucial flight control system in leaked 2016 instant messages has been transferred to a new job at the U.S. planemaker, two people familiar with the matter said on Tuesday. The 2016 conversation between the employee, Patrik Gustavsson, and then-colleague Mark Forkner, erased some $14 billion of its market value after they became public last month. Forkner's comments were among those pinpointed by U.S. lawmakers during back-to-back hearings in Washington as evidence Boeing knew about problems with flight control software well before the two crashes in the span of five months killed a total of 346 people.

  • FAA expands area to inspect for cracks in Boeing 737 NG planes
    Reuters

    FAA expands area to inspect for cracks in Boeing 737 NG planes

    The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said on Tuesday it was revising its order requiring checks for structural cracks in Boeing 737 NG planes to cover a larger area after the company said additional cracks had been found. Boeing said on Tuesday after completing a round of inspections for cracking on some 737 NGs with a large number of take-offs and landings, one airplane was found to have a small crack in an adjacent location. "Boeing has asked those operators to also inspect the adjacent area to ensure any potential issue is identified and repaired," the company said in a statement.

  • Boeing orders sink as customers opt to swap MAX
    Reuters

    Boeing orders sink as customers opt to swap MAX

    Net orders so far this year came to just 45 at the end of October, down from 56 in September, further widening the gap on sales this year with the company's European rival Airbus SE which has now sold nearly 500 more planes. After an accounting adjustment representing jets ordered in previous years, but now unlikely to be delivered, Boeing's net total for orders this year sank to a negative 95 airplanes. The orders included what Boeing called a "conversion" by Air Lease Corp of 15 MAX orders into five 787 Dreamliners.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - S&P, Nasdaq See Small Gains After Hitting Highs

    Investing.com - Stocks ended basically flat Tuesday as President Donald Trump's speech did not offer clues on when a China-U.S. trade deal will be signed.

  • Investing.com

    Wall Street Fights to Keep Early Gains

    Investing.com – Stocks were struggling to hold onto morning gains Tuesday even as President Donald Trump touted his administration's economy policy and hopes for a phase one trade deal.

  • Embraer lowers dividend guidance, burns cash, as Boeing deal hits snags
    Reuters

    Embraer lowers dividend guidance, burns cash, as Boeing deal hits snags

    Brazilian planemaker Embraer signalled it may issue a smaller dividend to shareholders as it burns through cash before finalizing a $4.2 billion commercial passenger jet deal with Boeing, which faces regulatory hurdles. Embraer now expects the dividend to range between $1.3 billion-$1.6 billion, compared with previous guidance of $1.6-billion-$1.7 billion, the company said in a securities filing. During an earnings call with analysts, executives said the dividend guidance was lowered due to additional cash needs in 2019, partly due to cost base revisions to a new military plane.

  • Stock Market News for Nov 12, 2019
    Zacks

    Stock Market News for Nov 12, 2019

    Wall Street closed mixed on Monday as invertors??? remained concerned about a partial trade between the United States and China.

  • Boeing 737 Max grounding hits London-listed supplier
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Boeing 737 Max grounding hits London-listed supplier

    Meggitt said the grounding of the jets means operating margins for the year will be at the lower end of forecasts.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Meggitt boosts annual organic revenue forecast; warns of pressured margins

    Engineering firm Meggitt Plc on Tuesday raised its outlook for annual organic revenue growth, buoyed by a strong third-quarter performance in the U.S. defence market, but warned margins would be pressured because of Boeing's grounded 737 MAX. The company, which supplies aerospace components and wheels and brakes for military fighter programmes, said it expects full year organic revenue growth between 6% and 7%, up from an earlier view of 4% to 6%. Meggitt is a key supplier to Airbus and Boeing, which earlier this year said it would cut production of its 737 MAX aircraft as it struggles with the worldwide grounding of the narrowbody jet following two fatal crashes in less than five months.

  • Are Passenger Jet Engines Hitting Their Technical Limits?
    Bloomberg

    Are Passenger Jet Engines Hitting Their Technical Limits?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The high-pressure turbine blades in a Trent 1000 passenger jet engine have to withstand temperatures far above the melting point of the nickel alloy from which they’re made. It’s a fiendish technical challenge for the engine’s British manufacturer, Rolls-Royce Holdings Plc — comparable to trying to stop an ice cube melting inside a kitchen oven on full blast. The solution found by the company’s engineers was to blow cool air through tiny holes in the blades. Unfortunately this clever approach has encountered some unexpected problems.Boeing 787 aircraft operated by British Airways, Norwegian Air Shuttle, Virgin Atlantic and others have been grounded in recent months for inspections and repairs because the Trent 1000 engine blades have been degrading faster than anticipated. It’s the type of problem that’s becoming common in the industry as the demands placed on engines become ever greater.The expense of dealing with these things is rising too. Last week, Rolls-Royce quantified the cost of fixing various Trent 1000 issues at 2.4 billion pounds ($3.1 billion), a cash outflow the debt-laden manufacturer can ill afford.Few inventions have done more to transform our life over the past century than jet engines. They’ve let people travel faster and further, and they’re remarkably safe. Passenger fatalities like the one caused by a turbine failure on a Southwest Airlines flight last year are rare. Developed at enormous expense and using innovative new materials, the most recent “powerplants” (to use engines’ industry name) are comparatively quiet and fuel efficient.Yet these innovations have taken the technology closer to its technical limits and reliability issues have crept in. “By pushing the envelope on thrust and efficiency, things have started to go wrong elsewhere in the system,” says Nick Cunningham at Agency Partners. This is worrying because companies are under pressure to build even more efficient propulsion systems to curb carbon emissions. Rolls-Royce’s problems appear the most serious — some 40 787s powered by its engines are parked — but this is an industry-wide issue. Forced to ground planes and adjust flight schedules, airlines have resorted to leasing replacement aircraft and have told engine manufacturers to pay compensation.In September Tim Clark, the boss of Emirates, said manufacturers are delivering aircraft that don’t do what was promised. “Give us airframes and engines that work from day one. If you can’t do it, don’t produce them,” he said.The laws of science aren’t the only thing testing the engine makers. Airbus SE and Boeing Co. have brought several new passenger jets to market in quick succession and their powerplant suppliers have had to ramp up production rapidly. A lot of new demand is from emerging markets where dusty or polluted air can put additional strain on engines.Airbus production was thrown into chaos last year by engine glitches involving Pratt & Whitney’s geared turbofan (GTF) for the A320neo, Airbus’s top-selling jet. More recently the launch of Boeing’s 777x wide-body aircraft was pushed to next year after the premature wearing out of a General Electric engine component.It’s one thing for an engine to miss tough production targets, but quite another for engines to fail once they’re in service. “Engine manufacturers have always had teething problems but in four decades I’ve never seen anything like the list of technical issues they’re been having lately,” says John Strickland, director of JLS Consulting. This month India threatened to ground scores of Airbus A230neo jets operated by domestic carrier Indigo unless the Pratt engines were replaced by the end of January. The warning followed several incidents of engines shutting down in-flight.In October Lufthansa AG subsidiary Swiss temporarily grounded its Airbus A220(1) fleet so the Pratt engines could be inspected after a spate of powerplant failures (the debris from one such incident was recovered from a French forest last week). Since then Canadian regulators ordered the same aircraft not to operate at full power above a specified altitude.About 70% of airlines and lessors surveyed by Citi Research said groundings caused by engine issues were a key concern. Some are looking to operate mixed fleets to lessen the risk of one engine type being grounded. While that’s prudent, it’s more expensive than using a single type of equipment.The risk for engine manufacturers is that reliability issues cost them market share. Earlier this year Air New Zealand switched an order for 787 jet engines to GE after problems with its Rolls-Royce kit. Indigo placed a $20 billion order with the GE/Safran engine joint venture rather buy from Pratt (Pratt claimed the decision was price-related).The problems haven’t affected all new technologies. Rolls-Royce’s XWB powerplant for the Airbus A350 has proven reliable so far. The core gearing innovation underpinning Pratt’s GTF also appears to work as planned; a relief because it cost about $10 billion to develop.  There’s more at stake, though, than airline flight schedules and manufacturers’ pride and profitability. As with the car industry, the aerospace sector is gearing up for an epochal effort to curb carbon emissions. Aviation accounts for 2%-3% of greenhouse gas emissions but the sheer volume of plane deliveries in coming years will counteract engine efficiency gains. Aviation’s share could rise to between 10% and 25% by 2050, a Roland Berger study found. Unlike carmakers, the airlines lack viable technological alternatives. Biofuels have potential but fully electric large commercial aircraft are probably decades awayEngine manufacturers are working on still more efficient jet engine designs. Rolls-Royce claims its Ultrafan technology will deliver a 25% improvement in fuel burn compared to the first generation of Trents. Bringing these innovations to market quickly is essential from a planetary perspective but rushing development could prove counterproductive. “My sense is that public opinion in Europe at least is moving quicker than the technology,” says Rob Stallard at Vertical Research Partners.Cunningham is even less optimistic. “Gas turbines are running out of road at just the point where the political impetus is toward greater decarbonization,” he says. “Jet engines are unlikely to get a lot better from here.”(1) The plane was developed by Bombardier Inc and was known as the C-Series before Airbus acquired a majority stake.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Boeing 737 Max jets could fly again by January with safety checks under way
    The Guardian

    Boeing 737 Max jets could fly again by January with safety checks under way

    A fault with the Boeing 737 Max plane’s anti-stall mechanism is believed to have caused the Lionair crash in Indonesia and the Ethiopian Airlines disaster. Photograph: Justin Lane/EPABoeing said on Monday it could have its fleet of 737 Max jets flying again by January as safety checks on the aircraft’s troubled flight software reach completion. The planes were grounded in March in the wake of two fatal crashes in the space of five months that killed 346 people.The world’s biggest planemaker said it hoped the Federal Aviation Administration would approve certification of the plane’s flight control software before the end of the year. A fault with the plane’s anti-stall mechanism is believed to have caused the Lionair crash in Indonesia last October and then the Ethiopian Airlines disaster in March.“Based on this schedule, it is possible that the resumption of Max deliveries to airline customers could begin in December, after certification, when the FAA issues an airworthiness directive rescinding the grounding order,” the company said in a statement.“In parallel, we are working towards final validation of the updated training requirements, which must occur before the Max returns to commercial service, and which we now expect to begin in January.”The 737 Max was a staple of many airline fleets around the world. All 371 aircraft in operation were grounded after regulators in Asia took the planes out of service, which was soon followed by the FAA decision to take it out of service in North America.Boeing’s share price fell sharply after the grounding of the planes and the company estimated in April that the decision would cost it $1bn as it was forced to cut production.It faces dozens of lawsuits from victims of the two crashes and has also been criticised for potentially misleading the FAA over what it knew about problems with the software.It had hoped to have the planes back in operation by August but problems have dogged the company’s efforts to fix the issues with the anti-stall system, which is known as the manoeuvering characteristics augmentation system, or MCAS. It was designed to compensate for the fitting of a heavier engine to the aircraft by ensuring that the nose of the plane would automatically turn down to avoid stalling.But Boeing appeared to be confident that five key testing procedures would soon be completed. The first, involving multiple simulator evaluation tests on the software system with the FAA, had been completed, Boeing said. Still ongoing were tests by airline and FAA pilots, a final submission to the FAA and then tests by “global regulatory pilots to validate training requirements”.FAA clearance may not be enough to see the planes returned to service all over the world.The Australian aviation regulator said in September that it may keep the ban in place whatever decision comes out of the FAA.“As the certifying authority for the aircraft type, obviously the FAA is central to the decision as to whether the aircraft flies or not but in this case due to the nature of it there is focus on the aircraft from authorities around the world,” the Civil Aviation Safety Authority said.The Australian airline Qantas pulled three regular 737 jets – a different model to the 737 Max – from service in October after small cracks were found between the wing and the fuselage.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    GLOBAL MARKETS-Dollar, stocks slip amid trade deal uncertainty

    The dollar slid and global equity markets fell on Monday after U.S. President Donald Trump's remarks over the weekend dashed investor optimism that Washington and Beijing would soon reach a deal to end their debilitating trade war. Moody's warning on Britain's sovereign debt weighed on shares in London, while escalating violence in Hong Kong led Asian equities to their biggest daily decline since August, boosting demand for the safe-haven yen and Swiss franc. Trump said on Saturday that the U.S.-Sino trade talks were moving along "very nicely" but more slowly than he would have liked.

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